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ROTC

Air Force ROTC
319 Memorial Hall, 479-575-3651/3652
E-mail: rotc030@uark.edu
Professor of Aerospace Studies
Lieutenant Colonel Buster G. McCall
World Wide Web
http://www.uark.edu/~afrotc/

Army ROTC
207 Army ROTC Building, 479-575-4251/5853,
Toll Free: 1-866-891-5538, Fax: 479-575-5855
E-mail: armyrotc@cavern.uark.edu
Professor of Military Science and Leadership
Lieutenant Colonel Clark B. Taylor
World Wide Web
http://www.uark.edu/armyhog/

The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs at the University of Arkansas provide physical and mental challenges that are not offered anywhere else on campus. The ROTC programs prepare young men and women for careers as professional military officers. In addition to academic studies, each service requires that all students attend a weekly leadership laboratory.

The freshman and sophomore courses are electives offered to male and female students who may earn four hours of academic credit in Aerospace Studies or up to six hours in Military Science. Absolutely no military obligation is incurred by non-scholarship students as a result of their enrollment in or completion of any or all of their freshman or sophomore ROTC courses.

U. S. Air Force ROTC

In addition to the first two years of academic study (see above), the University, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, offers two years of advanced instruction in Aerospace Studies. The advanced instruction prepares students for the responsibilities and privileges of a commissioned officer. This advanced instruction offers three hours of academic credit per semester for Air Force cadets.

Air Force ROTC (AFROTC) cadets must attend and successfully complete field training. AFROTC cadets usually attend field training between their sophomore and junior years. Air Force ROTC cadets may volunteer to attend various professional development courses during their non-field training summers.

Each student must successfully complete the summer field training to qualify for the advanced ROTC program. All veterans who have completed basic training and 180 days of service with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces are exempt from the freshman AFROTC course.

Financial assistance is also available in the form of monthly stipends for cadets officially enrolled in the advanced training program, who have successfully completed summer field training. Additionally, Air Force ROTC offers four-, three-, and two-year scholarships to competitively selected students. All scholarship students receive a monthly tax-free allowance ranging from $300 to $450, payment of tuition expenses, textbook payment, and payment of certain other fees. Additional information and applications for this assistance may be obtained on the AFROTC Web site.

A student who successfully completes the Advanced Course in Air Force ROTC and receives a degree will be awarded a commission and will serve on active duty in the U. S. Air Force.

All textbooks, instructional material, and equipment required for ROTC courses are furnished at no cost to the student.

U. S. Army ROTC

In addition to the first two years of academic study, the University, in cooperation with the U.S. Army, offers two years of advanced instruction in Military Science, Leadership, Ethics, and Personal Confidence. The advanced instruction prepares students for the responsibilities and privileges of a commissioned officer. This advanced instruction offers four hours of academic credit per semester for Army cadets. Additionally, all students enrolled in the final two years of ROTC receive a monthly tax-free allowance ranging from $450 to $500.

Army ROTC cadets attend a paid 28-day Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) between their junior and senior school years. Cadets may attend professional development training such as Leadership Internships, Airborne, Air Assault, British Exchange Program, Northern Warfare, Nurse Summer Training Program, Mountain Warfare and Cultural Immersion Overseas Program in the summer during their sophomore year. During summer field training, cadets receive room and board.

For students having a minimum of two academic years in school remaining (undergraduate, graduate, or a combination of the two), an alternate two-year program is offered. Students entering the two-year ROTC program attend a 28-day Leaders Training Course (LTC) during the summer. Students who attend LTC and are otherwise qualified are eligible for two-year scholarships. Rising juniors, seniors and graduate students who meet the U.S. Army Cadet Command’s Scholar-Athlete-Leader criteria and are unable to attend the LTC may elect to participate in the Accelerated Cadet Commissioning Training (ACCT) program conducted on the UA campus.

Students with high school-level military schooling (JROTC, NDCC, or Military Academy) may qualify for the advanced ROTC program without completing the freshman or sophomore courses. All veterans who have completed basic training and 180 days of service with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces can receive full credit for the freshman and sophomore courses and may enter ROTC at the advanced level, once junior academic standing has been achieved.

Financial assistance is also available to qualified students enrolled in ROTC courses. The Army offers two, two-and-one-half, three, three-and-one-half, and four-year scholarships. Freshman or sophomore students who are not enrolled in Army ROTC may qualify for on-campus two or three-year scholarships. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students who have at least two full years of college remaining may also qualify for on-campus two or three-year scholarships. Scholarships can be used to pay for graduate school. Scholarship students receive a monthly tax-free allowance ranging from $300 to $500, payment of all tuition expenses, textbook payment ($1,200 per year), and payment of certain other fees. Additionally, some qualified three- and four-year scholarship winners may receive free room and board, provided they meet the University of Arkansas requirements for the Room and Board Scholarship.

Army ROTC scholarship and advanced course students must agree to successfully complete at least one semester of American Military History, LDAC, and a Staff Ride (Terrain Walk) prior to commissioning. Depending on the degree plan, Army ROTC may count from zero to 19 hours of elective credits for undergraduate students.

Army ROTC also offers a unique financial assistance program available to all non-scholarship Army ROTC Advanced Course students through the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP). This program allows students with 27 or more hours to be enrolled in Army ROTC while simultaneously serving with an Army Reserve or Army National Guard unit. Financial benefits of this program presently provide approximately $600 to $1,700 per month to enrolled students. Prior Service National Guard and Army Reserve students may also qualify for the Montgomery G.I. Bill, MGIB Kicker, the Veterans Administration Workstudy Program, Federal Tuition Assistance, and/or the Arkansas Army National Guard Tuition Assistance Program. Army ROTC Scholarship Nurse Cadets may also receive reimbursement for expenses related to Nursing Uniforms, Immunizations, Clinical Fees, Nursing Malpractice Insurance and the NCLX-RN review and testing.

A student who successfully completes the Advanced Course in the Army ROTC program and receives a degree may be accepted for a regular or reserve commission in one of the sixteen branches of the Army.

All textbooks, instructional material, and equipment required for ROTC courses are furnished at no cost to students.

(MILS) Army ROTC

MILS1001 Basic Outdoor Skills and Leadership Introduction (Fa) Incorporates various outdoor field craft skills involving both classroom and outdoor instruction. Subjects include small group leadership, rappelling, basic map reading, water safety and first aid. Introduction to safe use of a rifle and basic marksmanship. Introduction to organization, values, and role of the Army. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

MILS1011 Rappelling, Outdoor Field Craft and Leadership Development (Sp) Incorporates various outdoor field craft involving both classroom and outdoor instruction. Subjects include basic rappelling/mountaineering, intermediate map reading/ orienteering, first aid and outdoor cold/hot weather survival skills. Introduction to small group leadership principles. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week.

MILS1101 Basic Marksmanship (Fa) Introduction to safe use of a rifle and practical application of rifle marksmanship. Course includes weapons safety, mechanics, capabilities, and fundamentals of marksmanship. Includes visit to fire at a local indoor rifle range. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science.

MILS1211 Basic Outdoor Field Craft and Skills (Sp, Fa) Introduction to basic military survival skills and outdoor field craft. Subjects include cold/hot weather survival, water procurement methods, expedient field shelters, signaling, map reading and rappelling technique. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science. Classroom 2 hours per week.

MILS2002 Leadership Development I (Fa) Continuation of basic skills presented in MILS 1001 and MILS 1011. Course focus is on small unit leadership, team building and management skills. Includes an introduction to small unit tactics. Students develop leadership foundations by leading discussions, developing and briefing operation plans using the military decision making model. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS2012 Leadership Development II (Sp) Continuation of leadership skills presented in MILS 2002. Course focus is on decision making process, time management, and leadership skills. Includes an introduction to military writing and basic tactics. Cadets continue training in land navigation, first aid, and outdoor field craft. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS2101 Advanced Rifle Marksmanship (Sp) Course to teach students the fundamentals of Advanced Rifle Marksmanship. Class is conducted once a week with topics including: Air rifle, small bore firing, advanced practical exercises of different shooting positions and marksmanship competition with other universities. Prerequisite: MILS 1101.

MILS3004 Applied Leadership I (Fa) Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces.

MILS3014 Applied Leadership II (Sp) Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces.

MILS4001 Contemporary Military Issues (Sp, Fa) Individual study for advanced undergraduates. Students will research, write a paper, and give an oral presentation of a current military issue. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS4004 Advanced Leadership I (Fa) The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work (MILS 3004 and MILS 3014).

MILS4011 Advanced Military Correspondence (Sp, Fa) Practicum for advanced undergraduates. Students submit prepared military correspondence projects written in the military style using military forms and formats. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS4014 Advanced Leadership II (Sp) The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work.

(AERO) Air Force ROTC

AERO1011 The Foundations of the United States Air Force I (Fa) A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO1021 The Foundations of the United States Air Force II (Sp) A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO2011 The Evolution of Air and Space Power I (Fa) A historical survey of air and space power, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples illustrate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions. Additional topics: Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO2021 The Evolution of Air Power II (Sp) A historical survey of air and space power, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples illustrate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions. Additional topics: Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO3013 Air Force Leadership Studies I (Fa) A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO3023 Air Force Leadership Studies II (Sp) A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO4013 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I (Fa) Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Communication skills are honed within this structure. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO4023 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty II (Sp) Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Communication skills are honed within this structure. Corequisite: Lab component.

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