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Course Descriptions

How to Read a Course Description

Courses listed in this section describe all courses approved for offering by the University of Arkansas. The courses are listed alphabetically by code. The word “course” refers to a unit of academic instruction, while the word “class” refers to a course scheduled during a semester or summer session with a certain number of prescribed meetings each week. Successful completion of a class usually earns a specified number of semester hours of credit toward a degree.

The Schedule of Classes lists classes available in a specific semester, along with the instructor of record, time and place the class is being held. The Schedule of Classes for each semester is available at ISIS.

Course Description Explanations

Course Description Explanations

A course listing is comprised of the following elements, in order:

Course Prefix: This alpha descriptor is the first identifying part of a course. This four-letter code represents the course prefix name. Usually the course prefix will be the same as the department offering the course, but occasionally the prefix is one of many different courses offered in a single department. For example, ARAB refers to Arabic courses, which are offered through the Department of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Course Number: Each course is designated by a four-digit number. The first digit identifies the level of the course: 1, freshman level; 2, sophomore level; 3 and 4, junior-senior level; 5, 6, and 7, graduate level. Any exceptions to this practice are stated in the course descriptions.

Students desiring admission to courses offered at levels beyond their standing should request the instructor’s permission to enroll. (For definitions of academic standing see Student Standing under Orientation and Registration.)

The second and third digits of the number identify the course within the department that offers it.

The fourth digit identifies the semester-hour value of the course. Credit for certain courses does not count toward some degrees (see Courses that Do Not Count Toward Degrees under Orientation and Registration.)

Normally, courses meet once each week for 50 minutes for each hour of course credit. Laboratory, drill and other kinds of activity courses typically meet for two 50-minute periods per week for each hour of credit.

The letter ‘V’ is used in place of the last digit for those courses in which credit is variable. The minimum and maximum credit hours possible are given in parentheses after the course title.

The first three digits of the number are the same for corequisite courses (for example, a lecture, and the corequisite lab or drill).

Course Suffix: A suffix to the course number further identifies the specific type of instruction:

D — Drill or Discussion
L — Laboratory
H — Honors Course
E — Honors Drill or Discussion
M — Honors Laboratory

A course with no suffix is a typical lecture course (not an honors course).

Course Title: The title of the course is printed in bold letters.

Course Semester Offering: Course titles are followed by abbreviations (in parentheses) for the semester in which the course is normally offered. Courses marked (Sp) will be offered in the spring, courses marked (Fa) will be offered in the fall, courses marked (Su) will be offered in the summer, and courses marked (Irregular) will be offered irregularly. Consult the Schedule of Classes to verify that a course is being offered for a given term.

Course Description: A brief description of the course content and its major emphasis are stated. If the course is cross-listed (also offered under another course number) a “Same As” statement will be included in the description. If the course is eligible to be repeated for degree credit more than once, a statement will appear to indicate the total hours or times a course may be repeated. If no repeated statement is listed, the course may be used for degree credit only once.

Requisites: Requisites are requirements that must be fulfilled either before a course may be taken or at the same time a course is taken. It is the student's responsibility to make sure that he/she has completed the proper requisites before enrolling in any class. Prerequisites are courses or requirements that must be completed prior to enrolling in a certain course. Courses may have prerequisites from inside and outside the department. A course listed as a corequisite is to be taken in the same semester as the desired course. Courses listed as both pre- or corequisites are requirements that, if not taken prior to enrolling in a course, must be taken during the same semester as the course. Students may not enroll in courses for which they do not have the necessary requisites. Students who are in doubt concerning their eligibility to enroll in specific courses should consult with their academic adviser. Students may be dropped from courses for which they do not have the necessary requisites.

(AAST) African American Studies

AAST1003 Introduction to African American Studies (Fa) This course is an interdisciplinary study of the tangible and intangible contributions made by the indigenous people of Africa and their descendants to the world order and society with an emphasis on their manifestations in the United States of America.

AAST3233 African American History to 1877 (Fa) The course will study the African beginnings, the Caribbean and Latin American influences, and the African American early struggle to survive slavery in the new world, and the continuing social, political, and economical quest to become a first class citizen in American society until Reconstruction, 1492-1877.

AAST3243 African American History Since 1877 (Sp) The course will study the major social, political, and economical issues relating to the African American experience beginning with the late post-Reconstruction period and will include all of the major personalities and influences in the Civil Rights Movement, from 1877 to the present.

AAST3253 The History of Sub-Saharan Africa (Fa) Sub-Saharan African history from the 18th century to the present, with emphasis on the impact of the slave trade, colonization, Independence, and contemporary issues of the post-colonial period. Examination of the ways Africans experienced change in terms of culture, society, economics, gender, religion, politics, and labor.

AAST4063 Women in Africa (Irregular) Diversity of women's life experiences throughout sub-Saharan Africa will be examined. The class will investigate a range of topics, from marriage and motherhood to prostitution and popular culture. A historical dimension will be present throughout the course, and perspectives from literature and film will also be incorporated. (Same as ANTH 4063)

AAST4093 The History of African Americans and Social Justice (Even years, Fa) Explores how the United States has extended social justice to African Americans during the nation's history. Examines social justice for blacks and the impact of historic policies and practices on black life today.

AAST4293 African American Politics (Irregular) This is a survey course designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of African American political participation in the United States. In addition to analyzing important events in African American Politics, the course attempts to explain evolving patterns of political participation in Black America. (Same as PLSC 4293)

AAST4363 Independence and Africa Today (Sp) Examines the last half-century of Africa's history, focusing on the last few decades. Introduction of Africa's colonial past, revolutions and struggles for independence. Review of African development in the post-colonial and contemporary era, successes and failures of independent Africa, and the challenges the continent faces today.

AAST4383 The American Civil Rights Movement (Irregular) Introduction to the history and development of the civil rights movement in the United States. (Same as HIST 4383)

AAST4483 African American Biographies (Irregular) Introduction to the history and intellectual development of famous and not-so-famous African Americans. (Same as HIST 4483)

AAST499V African American Studies Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Explores the various aspects of the African American experience as it relates to the development of black and white relationships in American society and the world at large. (May be substituted for AAST 2003 with permission). Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore standing. (Same as DRAM 4463) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(ACCT) Accounting

ACCT3013 Accounting View of Economic Events (Sp, Fa) This course examines the relationship between economic events and the accounting view of those events. It explores the information that is captured by various accounting models and information that is ignored. The course emphasizes business processes, double entry accounting, and computer-based accounting information systems. Prerequisite: WCOB 1023.

ACCT310V Accounting Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) This class is designed to give students an internship opportunity to combine their formal academic preparation with an exposure to the accounting profession. Prerequisite: ACCT 3723 and ACCT 3843. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ACCT3533 Accounting Technology (Sp, Fa) This course provides an overview of accounting information systems and illustrates the importance of technology to accountants. Students are exposed to a variety of information technologies including manual, file-oriented, and database systems. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each type of system are highlighted and discussed. Prerequisite: ACCT 3723 or ACCT 3013 each with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT3613 Managerial Uses of Accounting Information (Sp, Fa) Use of accounting information for managerial decisions in a changing, global environment. Identifying the specific information needs of managerial decisions, focusing on the role of both financial and non-financial accounting information within the context of a continually changing information system technology. Covers business as well as non-profit and governmental organizations. This course includes spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisite: WCOB 1023.

ACCT3723 Intermediate Accounting I (Sp, Fa) This course is designed to study the theoretical basis for financial accounting concepts and principles related to financial reporting. This course emphasizes researching technical accounting pronouncements for application to external financial reporting issues. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043 with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT3753 Intermediate Accounting II (Sp) This is the second financial accounting course designed to continue study of financial accounting concepts and principles. This course emphasizes research of technical accounting pronouncements for application to external financial reporting issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 3013 or ACCT 3723 each with a grade of "C" or higher.

ACCT3843 Fundamentals of Taxation (Sp, Fa) Overview of basic income tax principles and tax planning techniques. Overview of the income tax treatment of business entities. Focus on the income tax treatment of individuals (with emphasis on the Federal Income Tax). Prerequisite: ACCT 3013 or ACCT 3723 each with a grade of "C" or better or graduate standing.

ACCT4003H Honors Accounting Colloquium (Irregular) Explores events, concepts and/or new developments in the field of accounting. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ACCT410V Special Topics in Accounting (Irregular) (1-3) Explore current events, concepts and new developments relevant to Accounting not available in other courses. Prerequisite: ACCT 3013 with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT4203 Taxation of Business Entities (Irregular) Focus on the income tax treatment of corporations and pass-through business entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 3843 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT4673 Product, Project and Service Costing (Sp) Cost systems with emphasis on information generation for cost management of products, projects and services. The course includes spreadsheet and other computer program analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 3013 or ACCT 3723 each with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT4963 Operational Auditing (Fa) The audit of efficiency, effectiveness, and performance of business and nonbusiness entities. Includes coverage of performance auditing techniques and application of these techniques to financial and nonfinancial functions. Prerequisite: ACCT 3013 or ACCT 3723 each with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5223 Accounting for Supply Chain & Retail Organizations (Fa) Highlights the role played by accounting information in managing supply chains and retail operations. Provides tools for managing cost flows, including activity-based costing, retail accounting, and operational budgeting. Focuses on improving decision making processes, and linking the impact of retail/supply chain decisions to financial statements and shareholder value. Prerequisite: MBAD 511V with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5413 Advanced Financial Accounting (Fa) Integrated course which examines the financial reporting, tax, managerial, systems and auditing aspects of major corporate restructurings arising from events such as mergers, acquisitions, spinoffs, reorganizations and downsizing. Prerequisite: ACCT 4753 with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5433 Fraud Prevention and Detection (Fa) An examination of various aspects of fraud prevention and detection, including the sociology of fraud, elements of fraud, types of fraud involving accounting information, costs of fraud, use of controls to prevent fraud, and methods of fraud detection. Prerequisite: MBAD 512V with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5443 Asset Management (Sp) Managing assets to achieve corporate strategy. Included are issues such as strategy formulation, acquisition processes, internal controls, system requirements, accounting measurements, inventory models, re-engineering, capital budgeting, tax issues, and discussion of current business events that have ethical implications. Prerequisite: MBAD 513V with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5463 Financial Statement Analysis (Sp) This course is designed to study financial statements and their related footnotes; tools and procedures common to financial statement analysis; the relationships among business transactions, environmental forces (political, economic, and social), and reported financial information; and how financial statement information can help solve certain business problems. Prerequisite: ACCT 3723 with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT549V Special Topics in Accounting (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Seminar in current topics not covered in other courses. Students may enroll in one or more units. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ACCT5873 Advanced Taxation (Fa) In-depth coverage of the tax treatment of corporations including advanced tax issues. Introduction to tax research including the organization and authority of tax law; accessing and using the tax law; and, applying tax law to taxpayer scenarios. Prerequisite: ACCT 3843 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5883 Individual Tax Planning (Sp) In-depth coverage of the tax treatment of passthrough business entities including advanced tax issues. Overview of the income tax treatment of estates and trusts. Overview of the essentials of estate and gift taxation. Prerequisite: MBAD 512V or ACCT 3843 each with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT5953 Assurance Services (Fa) The expression of assurance on financial statements and other forms of information for decision makers. Includes risk assessment, evidence gathering, and reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 4753 with a grade of "C" or better.

ACCT6013 Graduate Colloquium (Irregular) Presentation and critique of research papers and proposals. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ACCT6033 Accounting Research Seminar I (Irregular) First course in the accounting research seminar sequence which explores and evaluates current accounting literature. Course content reflects recent developments in the literature and specific interests of participants. Examples of potential topics include research methods in accounting, managerial accounting, behavioral accounting,

ACCT6133 Accounting Research Seminar II (Irregular) Second course in the accounting research seminar sequence which explores and evaluates current accounting literature. Course content reflects recent developments in the literature and specific interests of participants. Examples of potential topics include research methods in accounting, financial accounting, managerial accounting, behavioral accounting, tax, audit, international accounting, and education. Prerequisite: ACCT 6033.

ACCT6233 Accounting Research Seminar III (Irregular) Third course in the accounting research seminar sequence which explores and evaluates current accounting literature. Course content reflects recent developments in the literature and specific interests of participants. Examples of potential topics include research methods in accounting, financial accounting, managerial accounting, behavioral accounting, tax, audit, international accounting, and education. Prerequisite: ACCT 6033.

ACCT636V Special Problems in Accounting (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Special research project under supervision of a graduate faculty member.

ACCT6433 Accounting Research Seminar IV (Irregular) Fourth course in the accounting research seminar sequence which explores and evaluates current accounting literature. Course content reflects recent developments in the literature and specific interests of participants. Examples of potential topics include research methods in accounting, financial accounting, managerial accounting, behavioral accounting, tax, audit, international accounting, and education. Prerequisite: ACCT 6033.

ACCT6633 Accounting Research Seminar V (Irregular) Fifth course in the accounting research seminar sequence which explores and evaluates current accounting literature. Course content reflects recent developments in the literature and specific interests of participants. Examples of potential topics include research methods in accounting, financial accounting, managerial accounting, behavioral accounting, tax, audit, international accounting, and education. Prerequisite: ACCT 6033.

ACCT700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(AERO) Air Force ROTC

AERO1011 The Foundations of the United States Air Force I (Fa) A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO1021 The Foundations of the United States Air Force II (Sp) A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Office Training Corps. Topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO2011 The Evolution of Air and Space Power I (Fa) A historical survey of air and space power, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples illustrate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions. Additional topics: Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO2021 The Evolution of Air Power II (Sp) A historical survey of air and space power, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples illustrate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions. Additional topics: Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. Leadership LAB mandatory for cadets. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO3013 Air Force Leadership Studies I (Fa) A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO3023 Air Force Leadership Studies II (Sp) A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO4013 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I (Fa) Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Communication skills are honed within this structure. Corequisite: Lab component.

AERO4023 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty II (Sp) Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Communication skills are honed within this structure. Corequisite: Lab component.

(AFLS) Agricultural, Food & Life Sciences

 

AFLS1011 Freshman Orientation (Fa) An orientation to academic expectations, policies and procedures, resources, and career exploration in agricultural, food and life sciences. Lecture two days a week during the first eight weeks of the semester.

AFLS1011H Honors Freshman Orientation (Fa) The course will serve as an introduction to the basic information and requirements of the AFLS Honors Program. The course is available to all students, but is required for students in the honors program. Topics covered will include: purpose and organization of the honors program, course requirements, research and creative activity opportunities, and written and oral communication exercises. Recitation 3 hours per week for the first 5 weeks of the semester.

AFLS102VH Honors Special Topics for Freshmen (Irregular) (1-6) Topics not covered in other courses or in-depth study of a particular topic. Used primarily with the program for the Honors Program. Must be in Honors program to register for this course.

AFLS2003 Introduction to Global Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences (Fa) A cross-disciplinary approach focusing on global environmental resources, animal and crop production, food safety and nutrition, agricultural marketing and merchandising, trade, agricultural policies and culture. Topics also will include transportation, law and information systems in various geographic regions. Lecture 3 hours per week.

AFLS300V Study Abroad (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-24) Open to undergraduate students studying abroad in officially sanctioned programs. Study abroad may include summer internships, special topics, coursework abroad and/or directed individual or group study abroad trips of one-to-four weeks duration. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

AFLS3131H Honors Management and Leadership (Fa) Leadership styles and principles and organizational systems as they relate to professional situations. Recitation 3 hours per week for the first 5 weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: junior standing.

AFLS3211H Honors Professional Development (Sp) Professional networking, communication skills, and group dynamics as they relate to research, teaching, and extension. Recitation 3 hours per week for 5 weeks.

AFLS3231H Honors Intro to Scientific Thinking & Methods - Logic, Reasoning, & Sci. Argumentation (Fa) A course to introduce students to general patterns of scientific thinking, and methods of scientific evaluation and conclusion building through discussions, readings, and exercises in logic, reasoning, and argumentation. Recitation 3 hours per week for the second 5 weeks of the semester.

AFLS3313H Honors Global Issues in AFLS (Sp) The course offers students the opportunity to increase their understanding of global issues related to AFLS. The course is open to all students, but first priority will be given to AFLS Honors Students. A mandatory study tour will be scheduled during Spring Break. Recitation 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

AFLS3412H Honors Proposal Development (Sp) This course offers a synthesis level learning opportunity. Course will include creative process, ethics, proposal writing, literature review, experimental design, scientific theory and methods, data collection, statistics, budget, and summary. Students will draw on their background and presentations to create written proposals. Three hours per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

AFLS3512H Honors Rotations in Agricultural Laboratory Research (Sp) A laboratory course to introduce students to current laboratory research techniques used in agricultural and life sciences. Hands-on laboratory exercises will emphasize current cellular and molecular research techniques, laboratory notebook keeping, data interpretation, and presentation of results. 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 or equivalent.

AFLS400VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AFLS401VH Honors Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Studies of selected topics not covered in other courses. Must be in the Honors program to register for this course. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AFLS4021 Internship for Ambassadors (Sp, Fa) Practical experience gained through group dynamics, communication, planning and implementing college wide activities. Must be selected as a college Ambassador before enrolling. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AFLS4431H Honors Exploring Ethics (Fa) Exploring issues relevant to human deeds in plants, animals, and environment. Issues to be addressed include the sanctity of life issues, their role of mass media in the modern world and the responsibility of individuals as professionals. Recitation 3 hours per week for the second 5 weeks of the semester.

AFLS5001 Seminar (Fa) Review of scientific literature and oral reports on current research in the agricultural, food and life sciences. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AFLS500V Study Abroad (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-24) Open to graduate students studying abroad in officially sanctioned programs. May include coursework, internships, special topics, and/or directed individual or group study abroad. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

(AGEC) Agricultural Economics

AGEC1103 Principles of Agricultural Microeconomics (Sp, Fa) Introduction to agricultural economics, including a survey of the role and characteristics of agriculture businesses in our economic system. Basic economic concepts concerning price determination, profit maximization, and resource use are emphasized. The use of economic principles as applied to the production and marketing decisions made by managers of agricultural firms is demonstrated. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1203.

AGEC2103 Principles of Agriculture Macroeconomics (Sp, Fa) Applications of economics principles to problems of agricultural production, distribution, and income; including a study of the interrelationship between agriculture and other segments of the economy; and the dynamic forces in the economy which affect agriculture. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1203.

AGEC2143 Agribusiness Financial Records (Fa) Principles of small agricultural business management accounting practices are taught to allow students to gain hands-on experience with financial record keeping for a business. Resulting financial statements are analyzed to determine opportunities for enhancing financial efficiency. Prerequisites: AGME 2903 or equivalent and AGEC 1103.

AGEC2303 Introduction to Agribusiness (Sp) Introduction to agribusiness issues as they relate to the food processing, wholesale and retail sectors of the agricultural industry. Coverage of methods and tools agribusiness managers use to evaluate business opportunities. Case studies serve to communicate concepts of product distribution, design, promotion and pricing in the development of a marketing plan. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023.

AGEC2403 Quantitative Tools for Agribusiness (Sp) Introduction to quantitative methods used in agricultural economics and agribusiness with an emphasis on skills and techniques that will enhance the ability of students to perform in upper division coursework. Provides an overview of statistical and optimization methods used in research problems, economic theory, and applied decision making activities. Prerequisites: AGEC 1103 and MATH 2053.

AGEC3303 Food and Agricultural Marketing (Fa) Surveys consumer trends in food markets and the marketing activities of the food and fiber system. Emphasizes marketing concepts for both commodities and differentiated food products. Topics include applied consumer and price theory; marketing management; structure and performance of the food system; and current agricultural marketing topics. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023.

AGEC3313 Agribusiness Sales (Sp) Principles of professional sales and sales management techniques used in food and agricultural firms; develop a professional sales presentation; study current agribusiness industry professional sales persons and sales practices and techniques. Prerequisites: AGEC 1103 or AGEC 2103 or ECON 2013 or ECON 2023 or ECON 2143 or equivalent.

AGEC3373 Futures and Options Markets (Sp) Theory and mechanics of commodity futures and options markets including trading, margin, fees, etc. Price relationships between cash, futures and options. Fundamental and technical price analysis. Price risk management strategies for producers and users of agricultural commodity marketing plan. Speculative and hedging simulation exercises. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023.

AGEC3403 Farm Business Management (Fa) Application of economic principles for the profitable organization and operation of the farm business. Focuses upon agricultural production management decision-making tools: budgeting techniques (enterprise, partial, cash flow), balance sheet, income statement, cash flow, investment analysis and risk management. Recommended: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023), AGEC 2143, and AGME 2903

AGEC3413 Principles of Environmental Economics (Sp) An introductory, issues-oriented course in the economics of the environment. The course will focus on what is involved in how society makes decisions about environmental quality. The environmental issues important to the State of Arkansas and the United States will be emphasized. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023. (Same as ENSC 3413)

AGEC3503 Agricultural Law I (Sp) Examination of those areas of law especially applicable to agriculture. Fundamentals of contract law, torts law, and property law will accompany discussion of major areas of agricultural law; acquisition and disposal of farmland; farm tenancies; rights and limitations in the use and ownership of farmland; water law; environmental protection; protection of the productivity of agricultural land; and the law of sales and secured transactions in an agricultural context.

AGEC3523 Environmental and Natural Resources Law (Even years, Sp) Principles of environmental and natural resources law relevant to agriculture, food and the environmental sciences; legal principles relating to regulation of water, air, hazardous substances, land, wildlife, livestock, and water rights. Principles of civil and criminal liabilities and other developing legal and regulatory issues relating to agriculture and natural resources.

AGEC400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Special studies and readings conducted under the direct supervision of staff members to satisfy the requirements of individual students. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AGEC401V Internship in Agribusiness (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) A supervised practical work experience in an agribusiness firm or a governmental or industrial organization having direct impact on agriculture in order to gain professional competence and insight to employment opportunities. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

AGEC402V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Studies of selected topics in agricultural economics not available in other courses.

AGEC4113 Agricultural Prices and Forecasting (Sp) Price theory and techniques for predicting price behavior of general economy and price behavior of individual agricultural products will be analyzed. Provides practice in the application of economics and statistics to agricultural price analysis. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023), AGEC 2403, (introductory statistics AGST 4023 or STAT 2303 or WCOB 1033) and MATH 2053.

AGEC4143 Agricultural Finance (Fa) Methods and procedures whereby agricultural firms acquire and utilize funds required for their successful operation. Emphasis is placed upon role of finance and financial planning and consideration is given to an understanding of financial firms serving agriculture. AGEC 2143 or WCOB 1023 is recommended. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023) and AGEC 2103 (or ECON 2013).

AGEC4163 Agricultural and Rural Development (Irregular) Examination of agricultural and rural development issues in less developed countries. Alternative agricultural production systems are compared, development theories examined, and consideration given to the planning and implementation of development programs. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023).

AGEC4303 Advanced Agricultural Marketing Management (Irregular) Marketing concepts will be developed and applied to the global food and fiber system. The course will use both commodity and product marketing principles and economic theory to analyze varied marketing situations. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the role that demand analysis and consumer behavior play in market management. Prerequisite: AGEC 2303 and AGEC 3303.

AGEC4313 Agricultural Business Management (Fa) The planning, organizing, leading and controlling functions of management as they relate to agricultural business firms. Marketing of value-added products, budgeting, organizational structure, cost control, financial statements, capital budgeting and employee supervision and motivation. Case studies are used to teach communication and decision-making skills. Prerequisite: AGEC 2143 or equivalent, AGEC 2303 or equivalent, and senior standing is recommended.

AGEC4323 AgriBusiness Entrepreneurship (Sp) Agribusiness entrepreneurship is the process of bringing food or rural-based products and services from conceptualization to market. The course presents the opportunities, problems and constraints facing individuals and firms operating in rural or isolated markets while emphasizing the steps in conceptualization, development, marketing, and delivery-selling of agribusiness rural products. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or equivalent.

AGEC4373 Advanced Price Risk Management (Sp) Use of futures markets as risk shifting institutions. Students design and implement hedging and cross hedging strategies for grain farmers, country elevators, soybean crushers, poultry firms, etc. Spreadsheets and statistical techniques are used to develop optimal hedging ratios. Prerequisite: AGEC 3373.

AGEC4613 Domestic and International Agricultural Policy (Fa) Agricultural and food policies studied from domestic and international perspectives. Examines public policy in terms of rationale, content, and consequences. Economic framework used to assess policies to improve competitive structure, operation, and performance of U.S. and international food and agriculture. Farm, international trade, resource, technology, food marketing, and consumer policies analyzed. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023) and AGEC 2103 (or ECON 2013).

AGEC500V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individual reading and investigation of a special problem in agricultural economics not available under regular courses, under the supervision of the graduate faculty. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5011 Seminar (Sp, Fa) Presentation and discussion of graduate student research. Formal presentations are made by all graduate students. Consideration given to research design, procedures, and presentation of results. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC502V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Advanced studies of selected topics in agricultural economics not available in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC503V Internship in Agricultural Economics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) On-the-job application of skills developed in the M.S. program.

AGEC5133 Agricultural and Environmental Resource Economics (Even years, Sp) An economic approach to problems of evaluating private and social benefits and costs of altering the environment. Emphasis given to the interaction of individuals, institutions, and technology in problems of establishing and maintaining an acceptable level of environmental quality. Prerequisite: Minimum of 3 hours Agricultural Economics or Economics at 3000 level or higher or PhD standing.

AGEC5143 Financial Management in Agriculture (Irregular) Covers advanced topics in agricultural finance. The general focus of the course is the financial management of non-corporate firms. Covers the basic tools of financial analysis including financial arithmetic, asset evaluation under risk, and financial analysis and planning using econometric models. Such topics covered include management of current assets, capital budgeting, capital structure, and institutions involved in agricultural finance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5153 The Economics of Public Policy (Sp) This class will examine the impact of public policy on agricultural and other business sectors as well as households and individuals, particular in rural areas. Emphasis will also be placed on analyzing the potential impact of future policy changes. The course will focus on the application of welfare criteria and economic analyses to the problems and policies affecting resource adjustments in agriculture and rural communities. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5303 Agricultural Marketing Theory (Fa) Survey of the structure of agricultural product and factor markets including a critique of theoretical analyses of industry structure, conduct and performance; and a review of market structure research in agricultural industries. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5403 Quantitative Methods for Agribusiness (Fa) Application of quantitative techniques used to support managerial decision-making and resource allocation in agricultural firms. Provides exposure to mathematical and statistical tools (regression analysis, mathematical programming, simulation) used in economic analysis in agriculture. Emphasis is placed on computer applications with conceptual linkage to economic theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5413 Agribusiness Strategy (Sp) Addresses problems of strategy formulation in agribusiness emphasizing current problems and cases in agriculture. Surveys modern and classic perspectives on strategy with applications to agribusiness. Examines the development of firm level strategies within the structure and competitive environment of agricultural firms and industries. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC5613 Econometrics I (Fa) Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. The single equation model is examined emphasizing multicollinearity, autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity, binary variables and distributed lags and model specification. Prerequisite: MATH 2043 and knowledge of matrix methods, (which may be acquired as a corequisite), and (AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023) and (AGEC 2403 or AGST 4023 or STAT 2303 or WCOB 1033). (Same as ECON 5613)

AGEC5713 Food Safety Law (Irregular) This course provides students with an introduction to food law and policy, history of food regulation, the organization of federal food law and regulatory agencies, government inspection and enforcement powers, food safety standards, food labeling, food advertising and product liability. Web-based course.

AGEC600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGEC700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(AGED) Agricultural Education

AGED1001 Orientation to Agricultural and Extension Education (Fa) Continuation of AFLS 1011, Freshman Orientation, with attention given to sharing of possible solutions to individual problems. Exploration of anticipated collegiate experiences for departmental majors as well as post-graduation opportunities. Student and faculty interaction is stressed. The class meets during the last half of the fall semester twice a week. The class also meets 1 or 2 evenings for up to two hours each time.

AGED102V Special Topics for Freshmen (Irregular) (1-2) Topics not covered in other courses or in-depth study of a particular topic. Used primarily with the program for Beginning Scholars and the Honors Program. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

AGED1031 Introduction to Early Field Experience (Fa) A thirty hour field experience designed to give prospective agricultural education teachers an opportunity to observe and participate in a variety of school settings. Corequisite: CIED 1002.

AGED1122 Agricultural Youth Organizations (Fa) Survey course of agricultural youth organizations including 4-H, FFA, Grange, and others pertaining to membership, awards programs, benefits, and special recognition programs. Lecture and discussion. Two periods per week.

AGED3133 Methods in Agricultural Education (Fa) Methods and techniques in teaching agriculture at the secondary level. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Pre- or Corequisite: CIED 1002 . Prerequisite: AGED 1031 or CIED 1011.

AGED3141L Ag Communications Lab (Sp, Fa) Corequisite: AGED 3142.

AGED3142 Agri Communications (Sp, Fa) An overview of communications in the agricultural, food and life sciences, including newsletter design, slide presentations, newswriting, electronic communication and web publishing. Corequisite: AGED 3141L.

AGED3153 Leadership Development in Agriculture (Sp) Identification of styles and roles of leadership; development of leadership techniques and skills required in working with organizations; dynamics of group action; methods of resolving conflict; ethical considerations for leaders; and personal skills development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AGED3243 Ag Reporting and Feature Writing (Odd years, Fa) This course will provide students an exposure to writing, interviewing, and editing news on agricultural issues in agricultural industry publications. Students will gain practical experience with journalistic interviewing, news writing, feature writing, digital photography, and writing for broadcast on agricultural issues. This course is designed for students with at least six hours of upper division courses. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AGED3942 Professional Development in Agricultural Communications (Even years, Fa) Overview of professional and technical skills needed to succeed in internships and jobs in the field of agricultural communications.

AGED4003 Issues in Agriculture (Sp, Fa) Lecture and discussion on local, regional, national and international issues related to agricultural policy, ethics, environment, society, and science. Designed for students with at least six hours of upper division agricultural science courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

AGED400V Special Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual study or research for advanced undergraduates in the field of agricultural and extension education.

AGED4012 Program Development (Sp) Principles and concepts of leadership, program organization, supervised agricultural experience, and advisory committees. This course is a portion of pre-professional studies required for certification in agricultural education. Prerequisite: AGED 3133. (Same as AGED 401V)

AGED401V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Studies of selected topics in agricultural or extension education not covered in other courses. (Same as AGED 4012) May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AGED4143 Electronic Communications in Agriculture (Even years, Sp) An overview of communication technology in the agricultural, food and life sciences.

AGED4243 Graphic Design in AFLS Productions (Odd years, Sp) This course provides students with graphic design and software skills specific to industries in Agriculture, Food, and Life Sciences. Students will learn to use industry-standard software (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Microsoft Excel, etc.) to prepare text and graphics and package them for use in print production. Prerequisite: AGME 2903

AGED4343 Communication Campaigns in Agriculture (Even years, Fa) Students will develop understanding of the principles, practices and applications of social marketing, integrated marketing communications, advertising and public relations as they pertain to developing communication campaign strategies for the agricultural industry. Students will develop a communication campaign for an agricultural company and/or entity focused on a specific product or service. Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate status.

AGED4443 Principles of Technological Change (Fa) This course introduces a structured approach for dealing with the organizational and human aspects of technology transition, including the key concepts of resistance and change management, organizational change, communications, and processes by which professional change agents influence the introduction, adoption, and diffusion of technological change. This course may be offered as a web-based course. Prerequisite: Junior status.

AGED4632 Teaching Diverse Populations in Agricultural and Extension Education (Sp) This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers of agriculture with an understanding of teaching diverse populations as applied to problems of practice in agricultural and extension education.

AGED475V Internship in Agri Educ (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Scheduled practical field experiences under the supervision of a professional practitioner in off-campus secondary school systems. Emphasis includes classroom preparation, teaching, and student evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AGED4843 Methods in Agricultural Laboratories (Sp) Methods and management techniques in all types of agricultural laboratories that may be in a secondary agricultural science program. Emphasis on management of students and facilities, equipment, and materials. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AGME 2123.

AGED5001 Seminar (Sp) Presentations and discussion of graduate student research as well as review of current literature and topics of current interest by students and faculty. All graduate students will make at least one formal presentation.

AGED5013 Advanced Methods in Agricultural Mechanics (Fa) Emphasis on shop organization and management, courses of study, unit shop instruction, and development of skills in agricultural mechanics.

AGED5031 Ethics in Agricultural and Extension Education (Fa) A study of ethics as applied to problems of professional practice. The focus will be on case studies.

AGED5033 Developing Leadership in Agricultural Organizations (Fa) Organizational concepts of leadership; administrative styles and structures; leadership for boards, committees, governmental bodies, and review of societal and political processes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGED5053 Philosophy of Agricultural and Extension Education (Sp) An examination and analysis of social and economic events leading to the establishment and maintenance of federal, state, county, and local agricultural education programs. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGED5074 Program Management Practicum (Irregular) A course involving activities emphasizing the practical application of theory in on-the-job experiences in program management; must be taken in conjunction with AGED 575V. Prerequisite: Admission into the MAT program.

AGED510V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual investigation of a special problem in agricultural education which is not available through regular courses. These will be directed by a member of the graduate faculty. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGED520V Special Topics in Agricultural and Extension Education (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in agriculture education. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGED5463 Research Methodology in the Social Sciences (Sp) Logical structure and the method of science. Basic elements of research design; observation, measurement, analytic method, interpretation, verification, presentation of results. Applications to research in economic or sociological problems of agriculture and human environmental sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as HESC 5463)

AGED5473 Interpreting Social Data in Agriculture (Fa) The development of competencies in analyzing, interpreting and reporting the results of analyses of social science data in agriculturally related professions. Students will select appropriate analysis techniques and procedures for various problems, analyze data, and interpret and report the results of statistical analyses in narrative and tabular form. Prerequisite: AGST 4023 (or EDFD 5393) and AGED 5463 (or RSOC 5463 or HESC 5463).

AGED550V College Teaching in Agriculture and Related Disciplines (Irregular) (1-3) For students who are pursuing graduate degrees where emphasis is on preparation for a research career, but who also may desire or expect to teach. Provides theory and practice in planning and executing a college-level course.

AGED575V Internship in Agricultural Education (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Scheduled practical field experiences under supervision of a professional practitioner in off-campus secondary school systems. Emphasis includes classroom preparation, teaching, and student evaluation.

AGED600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(AGME) Agricultural Mechanization

AGME1611L Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Technology Laboratory (Fa) Study of basic mathematical and physical science concepts important in the mechanization of agriculture. Laboratory required for agricultural education, communication and technology majors enrolled in AGME 1613, optional for others enrolled in AGME 1613. Corequisite: AGME 1613.

AGME1613 Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Technology (Fa) Introduction to basic physical concepts important in agricultural technical systems: applied mechanics, power and machinery management, structures and electrification, and soil and water conservation. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: AGME 1611L (for AECT Majors).

AGME2123 Metals and Welding (Sp, Fa) An introduction to agricultural mechanics shop work to include hot and cold metal work, arc welding, and gas welding and cutting. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

AGME2903 Agricultural and Human Environmental Sciences Applications of Microcomputers (Sp, Fa) Lecture and laboratory assignments covering the contemporary use of microcomputers in agricultural research, production, and home economics. Major emphasis placed on learning to use selected, appropriate software packages. Lecture 2 hours per week, laboratory 2 hours per week.

AGME3042 Agricultural Construction Technology (Sp) Principles of building design and construction. Includes site selection calculating structural loads and computerized packages for building design. Safety practices, selection of building materials and determining costs are also included. Lecture is one hour and lab is two hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 and junior standing.

AGME3101L Small Power Units/Turf Equipment Laboratory (Sp) Testing, evaluation, and maintenance of engines, hydrostatic power transmission systems, and equipment commonly used in the turf and landscaping industries. Corequisite: AGME 3102. Prerequisite: MATH 1203.

AGME3102 Small Power Units/Turf Equipment (Sp) Principles of operation, adjustment, repair, maintenance, and trouble shooting of small air-cooled engines and power units, including various engine systems, service and maintenance of turf equipment and machinery. Lecture 2 hours per week. Corequisite: AGME 3101L. Prerequisite: MATH 1203.

AGME3153 Surveying in Agriculture and Forestry (Fa) Techniques and procedures normally used in determining areas and characterizing the topography of agricultural and forest lands. Includes basic concepts of surveying; use and care of level, transit, distance measuring equipment; topographic mapping and public land surveys. Lecture and laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 1203.

AGME3173 Electricity in Agriculture (Sp) Principles of electricity; wiring of home, farmstead and other agricultural structures; selection of electric motors and their care and application in the broad field of agriculture; lighting and special uses of electricity such as heating and electrical controls. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Math 1203.

AGME400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual research or study in electrification, irrigation, farm power, machinery, or buildings. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

AGME4011 Senior Seminar (Sp) For agricultural education, communication and technology majors. Covers how to prepare and present a report on a current topic, job opportunities, and professionalism. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

AGME402V Special Topics in Agricultural Mechanization (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of special topics in agricultural mechanization.

AGME4203 Mechanized Systems Management (Fa) Selection, sizing, and operating principles of agricultural machinery systems, including power sources. Cost analysis and computer techniques applied to planning and management of mechanized systems. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Math 1203.

AGME4973 Irrigation (Sp) Methods of applying supplemental water to soils to supply moisture essential for plant growth, sources of water, measurement of irrigation water, pumps, conveyance structure, economics, and irrigation for special crops. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Math 1203.

(AGST) Agricultural Statistics

AGST400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Work on special problems of agricultural statistics or related areas.

AGST4011 SAS Programming for Agricultural Sciences (Sp, Fa) An introduction to the SAS programming language with an emphasis on the reading and restructuring of data files, and the displaying of data in tabular and graphic forms. The course is taught using a hands-on approach.

AGST4023 Principles of Experimentation (Sp, Fa) Fundamental concepts of experimental and statistical methods as applied to agricultural research. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or higher level.

AGST500V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual investigation of a special problem in some area of statistics applicable to the agricultural, food, environmental, and life sciences not available under existing courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AGST5014 Experimental Design (Sp) Types of experimental designs, their analysis and application to agricultural research. Lecture 3 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: AGST 4011 and (AGST 4023 or STAT 4003).

AGST504V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a broader-based study of specific topics in statistics and related areas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AGST5713 Applied Regression Analysis for Agricultural Sciences (Fa) Analysis of agricultural experiments which contain quantitative factors through regression procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AGST 4011 and (AGST 4023 or STAT 4003).

AGST5803 Case Studies in Biometry (Irregular) Non-standard statistical problems arising in the agricultural, food, environmental, and life sciences. Prerequisite: STAT 5113 and STAT 5313 and either AGST 5014 or STAT 4373.

AGST5901 Statistical Consulting Process (Sp) Examines the components of statistical consulting with emphasis on the interpersonal aspects.

AGST5913 Statistical Consulting Practicum (Irregular) Supervised statistical consulting. Prerequisite: STAT 5313 and AGST 5901 and either (AGST 5014 or STAT 4373).

(AIST) Asian Studies

AIST4003 Asian Studies Colloquium (Fa) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change of subject, required of students in the Asian studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AIST4003H Honors Asian Studies Colloquium (Fa) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change of subject, required of students in the Asian studies program. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(AMST) American Studies

AMST2003 Introduction to American Studies (Fa) Introduction to American Studies as an interdisciplinary field of study. Examination of a selected topic from various methodological perspectives.

(ANSC) Animal Science

ANSC1001L Introductory to Animal Sciences Laboratory (Fa) Study of facilities used in production, processing, and management in animal agriculture. Identification, selection evaluation and testing of livestock, meat, and milk. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

ANSC1032 Introductory Animal Sciences (Fa) Students will be introduced to biological sciences associated with modern systems of care and management of livestock. Foundation sciences include topics in genetics, growth and development, physiology, nutrition, animal health, and animal behavior. Course will meet M, T, W, and R for the first eight weeks of the fall semester.

ANSC1041 Introduction to Companion Animal Industry (Fa) The importance of companion animals and their allied industries will be discussed. Application of scientific principles to the care and management of companion animals, specifically dogs, cats and horses, will be emphasized. Course will meet on T and R during the second eight weeks of the fall semester.

ANSC1051 Introduction to the Livestock Industry (Fa) The importance of livestock and their allied industries will be discussed. Application of scientific principles to the care and management of livestock, specifically beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep, and goats will be emphasized. Course will meet on M and W during the second eight weeks of the fall semester.

ANSC2003 Introduction to Equine Industry (Sp) Examination of careers and business opportunities in the equine industry. Students will gain the opportunity to identify high quality horses through evaluation of conformation and locomotion. Students will also gain skill at oral presentation and be knowledgeable of costs and responsibilities associated with horse ownership.

ANSC2213 Behavior of Domestic Animals (Fa) Behavior associated with domestication. Effects of selective breeding, physical and social environments, and developmental stage on social organization, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior, productivity, and training of domestic animals.

ANSC2252L Introduction to Livestock and Meat Evaluation (Sp) Develop an understanding between live animal evaluation and carcass composition. Comparative judging including meat evaluation, classification and selection of beef cattle, sheep and swine.

ANSC2304 Equine Behavior and Training (Fa) Psychology and ethology of equine social behavior and how it pertains to learning patterns. Application of fundamental behavioral concepts to training of horses. Students will apply classical, practical, and proven equine training techniques to achieve safe, less-traumatic learning for the horse and trainer. Lecture two hours and laboratory six hours per week. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

ANSC2781 Career Preparation and Development (Fa) The importance of preparing for a career in the animal sciences and industries will be covered.

ANSC3003 Applied Animal Parasitology (Odd years, Sp) The economically important parasites of domestic animals with emphasis on their host relationships and management considerations. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ANSC3013 Parasitisms of Domesticated Non-Herbivores (Even years, Sp) Course will provide applied instruction and appreciation for the parasitisms of our domesticated swine, chickens, turkeys, dogs and cats.

ANSC3032 Animal Physiology I (Fa) Fundamental aspects of neural/muscle/bone tissues and the cardiovascular system. The normal structure and functions of these systems will be emphasized. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1074. (Same as POSC 3032)

ANSC3042 Animal Physiology II (Sp) Fundamental aspects of renal, respiratory, digestive, and endocrine physiology will be covered. The normal structure and function of these systems will be emphasized. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3032 or POSC 3032. (Same as POSC 3042)

ANSC3123 Principles of Genetics (Fa) Fundamentals of heredity, with special emphasis on the improvement of farm animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and MATH 1203 or higher. (Same as POSC 3123)

ANSC3133 Animal Breeding and Genetics (Sp) Application of the principles of genetics to the breeding of farm animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and MATH 1203.

ANSC3143 Principles of Animal Nutrition (Sp) Scientific approach to animal nutrition involving the mechanisms through which feed nutrients are utilized by farm animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L.

ANSC3151L Applied Animal Nutrition Laboratory (Fa) Practical approach to animal nutrition; use of various methods of feedstuff evaluation and ration balancing for domestic animals. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: ANSC 3152. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 and MATH 1203.

ANSC3152 Applied Animal Nutrition (Fa) Practical approach to animal nutrition; physical and chemical composition of feedstuffs, feed processing and preparation, nutrient interactions, and application of nutritional principles to feeding domestic animals. Lecture 2 hours per week. Corequisite: ANSC 3151L. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 and MATH 1203.

ANSC3282 Livestock Judging and Selection (Fa) Comparative judging, including grading, classification, and selection of beef cattle, swine, sheep and horses. Oral and written discussion. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 or ANSC 2252L.

ANSC3291 Livestock Junior Judging Team Activity (Sp) Training for membership on judging teams, through participation.

ANSC3333 Diseases of Livestock (Sp) Introductory study of the diseases of farm animals with emphasis on fundamental principles of disease, body defense mechanisms, hygiene, and sanitation. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543.

ANSC3433 Fundamentals of Reproductive Physiology (Fa) Principles of mammalian reproductive physiology with emphasis on farm animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and BIOL 1543.

ANSC3613 Meat Science (Fa) The study of meat science and muscle biology. Topics will include animal/tissue growth and development and the relationship to meat quality. Meat processing, preservation, and meat safety concerns will also be considered. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2613 or CHEM 3603.

ANSC3723 Horse and Livestock Merchandising (Fa) Various types of merchandising programs for specific livestock enterprises will be presented. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of merchandising programs including how to organize, advertise, and manage a purebred auction sale of livestock.

ANSC3822 Equine Law (Odd years, Fa) Horse ownership presents unusual, if not unique, legal issues. This course examines the basic underpinnings of commercial transactions in horses, tort liability, business structure, environmental law and gaming regulation.

ANSC400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Special problems in the animal sciences for advanced undergraduate students. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANSC401V Internship in Animal Sciences (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Supervised work experience with private or government organizations Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANSC410V Special Topics in Animal Sciences (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in animal sciences. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032.

ANSC4252 Cow-Calf Management (Fa) Systems of cow-calf management including the practical application of the principles of breeding, feeding, and management to commercial and purebred beef cattle under Arkansas conditions. Lecture 1 hour and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and ANSC 3143 and ANSC 3133 and ANSC 3433.

ANSC4262 Swine Production (Even years, Fa) Methods in producing purebred and commercial swine with specific emphasis on the management programs needed for profitable pork production in Arkansas. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ANSC 3133.

ANSC4272 Sheep Production (Odd years, Sp) Purebred and commercial sheep management emphasizing the programs of major importance in lamb and wool production in Arkansas. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and ANSC 3143 and ANSC 3123.

ANSC4283 Horse Production (Sp) Production, use and care of horses and ponies including breeding, feeding, handling, and management. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and ANSC 3433.

ANSC4291 Livestock Senior Judging Team Activity (Fa) Training for membership on judging teams, through participation.

ANSC4452 Milk Production (Sp) Principles of breeding, feeding, and management of dairy cattle will be reviewed, and course will include field trip touring dairy industry. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and ANSC 3143.

ANSC4482 Companion Animal Management (Fa) The study and application of principles of domestication, nutrition, reproduction, parasitology, diseases, behavior, and husbandry management to companion animals. Dogs, cats, and exotic animals will be the species of primary interest. Practical problems of care and management of these species will be solved. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

ANSC4652 Stocker-Feedlot Cattle Management (Sp) Production and management systems for stocker and feed-lot cattle including practical applications of forage systems, feeding, health management and economics of production of these livestock. The course will include a tour of the stocker and feedlot industry in Arkansas, and surrounding areas. Prerequisite: ANSC 1032 and ANSC 3143 and senior standing.

ANSC500V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Work in special problems of animal industry. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANSC5013 Domestic Animal Energetics (Odd years, Sp) Physical, physiological and biochemical aspects of energy metabolism of domestic animals and their applications to livestock production. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANSC510V Special Topics in Animal Sciences (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in animal sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANSC5123 Advanced Animal Genetics (Even years, Fa) Specialized study of animal genetics. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3123. (Same as POSC 5123)

ANSC5133 Quantitative Inheritance (Odd years, Sp) Advanced study of the genetic basis of variation and the genetic control of quantitative traits in populations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3133.

ANSC5143 Biochemical Nutrition (Even years, Fa) Interrelationship of nutrition and physiological chemistry; structure and metabolism of physiological significant carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; integration of metabolism with provision of tissue fuels; specie differences in regulatory control of tissue and whole body metabolism of nutrients. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813. (Same as POSC 5143)

ANSC5152 Protein and Amino Acid Nutrition (Even years, Sp) Students will be introduced to the basic processes of protein digestion, amino acid absorption, transport, metabolism, and utilization along with how biochemical function of proteins and their dynamic state affect nutritional status for animals and man. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813. (Same as POSC 5152)

ANSC5253 Advanced Livestock Production (Irregular) Comprehensive review of recent advances in research relative to the various phases of livestock production. Prerequisite: ANSC 4252 (or ANSC 4263) and ANSC 3133 (or ANSC 3143).

ANSC5353 Advanced Hay and Silage Production (Fa) Advanced study of the principles of good hay and silage production. The course includes a detailed review of forage nutritive value followed by an in-depth discussion of the management of wilting forage crops, silage biochemistry, ensiling characteristics of various forages, silo management, spontaneous heating in hay and silage, dry matter loss, management of stored hay, and changes in forage quality that result from poor conservation of harvested forages. Prerequisite: CSES 3113 and ANSC 3152 and ANSC 3151L.

ANSC5743L Advanced Analytical Methods in Animal Sciences Laboratory (Fa) Introduction into theory and application of current advanced analytical techniques used in animal research. Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. (Same as POSC 5743L)

ANSC5763 Protozoan Parasites of Domestic Livestock and Companion Animals (Even years, Fa) Course topics will include economically and medically important protozoan parasites of domestic livestock and companion animals, with an emphasis on their significance for animal and human health. Lecture/discussion 3 hours per week. (Same as POSC 5763)

ANSC5853 Advanced Meats Technology (Even years, Su) An intensive study of processed meats, relating the science, technology, and quality of further processed meat and poultry products. Product development, sensory and chemical analysis, microbiology, nutritional aspects, and product labeling are covered. Prerequisite: POSC 4314 or ANSC 3613.

ANSC5901 Seminar (Fa) Critical review of the current scientific literature pertaining to the field of animal science. Oral reports. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ANSC5923 Brain & Behavior (Fa) Course covers cellular through neural systems, major brain functions and comparative neuroanatomy between mammals and birds. Specific topics include coverage of ion channels, membrane potentials, action potentials, synaptic integration, neurotransmitters, major brain regions of mammals and birds, sensory systems and the autonomic nervous system. Lecture 3 hours; Neuroscience Journal Club 1 hour per week (for first 8 weeks of semester). Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042, or PSYC 2003, or BIOL 2213, or BIOL 2443, or BIOL 2533.

ANSC5932 Cardiovascular Physiology of Domestic Animals (Fa) Cardiovascular physiology, including mechanisms of heart function and excitation, and blood vessel mechanisms associated with the circulatory system in domestic animals and poultry. Lecture 3 hours; drill 1 hour per week (for second 8 weeks of semester). Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042. (Same as POSC 5932)

ANSC5942 Endocrine Physiology of Domestic Animals (Fa) Endocrine physiology, including mechanisms of hormone secretion, function, and regulation. Mechanisms associated with the endocrine system will be discussed for domestic animals and poultry. Lecture 3 hours; drill 1 hour per week (or first 8 weeks of semester). Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042. (Same as POSC 5942)

ANSC5952 Respiratory Physiology of Domestic Animals (Sp) Respiratory physiology, including mechanisms of lung function and gas exchange. Mechanisms associated with the interaction of the respiratory system with other bodily systems in domestic animals and poultry will be discussed. Lecture 3 hours; drill 1 hour per week for first 8 weeks of semester. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042. (Same as POSC 5952)

ANSC5962 Gastrointestinal/Digestive Physiology of Domestic Animals (Sp) Gastrointestinal and hepatic physiology, including mechanisms of digestion, absorption of nutrients with emphasis on cellular control mechanisms in domestic animals and poultry. Lecture 3 hours; drill 1 hour per week (for second 8 weeks of semester). Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042. (Same as POSC 5962)

ANSC5972 Renal Physiology (Sp) Renal physiology, including mechanisms of renal clearance with emphasis on cellular control mechanisms in domestic animals and poultry. Lecture 3 hours; drill 1 hour per week (for second 8 weeks of semester). Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: POSC/ANSC 3032 and POSC/ANSC 3042. (Same as POSC 5972)

ANSC600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANSC6143 Minerals in Animal Nutrition (Odd years, Sp) Mineral nutrients, their sources and functions, as related to nutrition of domestic animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 or POSC 4343.

ANSC6243 Ruminant Nutrition (Odd years, Fa) Anatomy and physiology of the rumen. The nutrient requirements of microbial organisms and the relation of microbial digestion in the rumen to the nutrition of cattle, sheep and other ruminants. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANSC6253 Forage-Ruminant Relations (Odd years, Sp) Advanced chemical, physical, and botanical characteristics of forage plants, the dynamics of grazing, intake and digestion, and techniques of measuring forage utilization and systems analysis at the plant-animal interface. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 and CSES 3113. (Same as CSES 6253)

ANSC6343 Vitamin Nutrition in Domestic Animals (Even years, Sp) The vitamins required by domestic animals with emphasis upon their role in animal nutrition, physiological functions, and consequences of failure to meet the requirement of the animal. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 (or POSC 4343) and CHEM 3813. (Same as POSC 6343)

ANSC6833 Reproduction in Domestic Animals (Even years, Sp) Comprehensive review of current theory of reproductive function in domestic animals. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3433.

ANSC700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(ANTH) Anthropology

ANTH1011M Honors Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory (Fa) Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 1013.

ANTH1011L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory (Fa) Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 1013.

ANTH1013 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Fa) An introduction to the field of physical anthropology using human evolution as a unifying concept. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Co- or Prerequisite: ANTH 1011L or ANTH 1011M.

ANTH1023 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture.

ANTH1023H Honors Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Sp, Fa) Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality; comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture.

ANTH2013 Introduction to Latin American Studies (Irregular) This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America. Drawing on Latin American literature, history, sociology, and political science, the course examines the broad forces that have shaped the region. (Same as LAST 2013)

ANTH3003 World Prehistory (Irregular) Survey of the prehistoric and early historic cultures of the Americas, Asia, and Africa.

ANTH3021L Archeology Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of archeology. Corequisite: ANTH 3023.

ANTH3023 Approaches to Archeology (Sp, Fa) Study of the field of archeology including method, theory, analysis and interpretation with substantive worldwide examples. Corequisite: ANTH 3021L.

ANTH3033 Egyptology (Irregular) Explores multiple aspects of Ancient Egyptian civilization including chronology, art, religion, literature and daily life. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTH3123 The Anthropology of Religion (Sp) An exploration of rituals, symbols, and rules that shape religious life. Religion is viewed broadly, considering activities that invoke powers beyond the reach of ordinary senses. Examining a variety of cultures, we explore what people say and do as they participate in activities such as magic, healing, pilgrimage, and contemporary religious movements.

ANTH3143 Language and Expressive Culture (Irregular) This course explores the complex interrelationship of language, culture, and social identity. Verbal art and expressive culture are examined from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Topics include ethnographies of speaking, discourse analysis, cultural performances, and the performative aspects of oral expression. (Same as COMM 3143,ENGL 3143)

ANTH3163 Male and Female: A Cultural and Biological Overview (Fa) A comparative study of male and female roles in culture in relation to human biology and socialization.

ANTH3173 Introduction to Linguistics (Irregular) Introduction to language study with stress upon modern linguistic theory and analysis. Data drawn from various languages reveal linguistic universals as well as phonological, syntactic, and semantic systems of individual languages. Related topics: language history, dialectology, language and its relation to culture and society, the history of linguistic scholarship. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Same as COMM 3173,ENGL 3173,WLLC 3173)

ANTH3213 Indians of North America (Irregular) Study of the Indians of North America and Mexico emphasizing lifeways at early White contact and subsequent acculturation.

ANTH3253 Cultures of the South (Sp) Survey of the diverse ethnic and racial groups of the American South with special emphasis on social and cultural traits related to contemporary developments. (Same as PLSC 3273,SOCI 3253)

ANTH3263 Indians of Arkansas and the South (Odd years, Sp) Study of the traditional lifeways and prehistoric backgrounds of Indians living in the Southern United States, including Arkansas.

ANTH3421L Human Osteology Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of human osteology. Corequisite: ANTH 3423.

ANTH3423 Human Osteology (Sp) Study of the human skeleton, identification of bones, allometric growth, sexual dimorphism, osteological genetic inheritance and environmental stresses. Lectures and demonstration. Corequisite: ANTH 3421L.

ANTH3433 Human Evolution (Sp) A study of hominid evolution from origin to the present, including trends in comparative primate evolution and functional development of human form as a result of cultural and biological interaction.

ANTH3443 Criminalistics: Forensic Sciences (Irregular) Introduction to forensics focused on the scientific analysis of physical and biological evidence encountered in criminal investigations. Chemical, microscopic, biological, and observational techniques employed in the analysis of material evidence are described, discussed, and illustrated within an investigative framework. Topics include inorganic remains, fiber, tissue, human identification, fingerprints, tools, and weapons.

ANTH3473 North American Prehistory (Irregular) Survey of the aboriginal prehistory of the North American Continent north of Mexico.

ANTH3503 Power and Popular Protest in Latin America (Irregular) This course focuses on the historical formation of Latin America by examining conflicts between the region's rich and poor. It includes both an historical perspective on the formation of ethnic, gender, and class relations in Latin America, and a discussion of contemporary social problems.

ANTH3523 Gender and Politics in Latin America (Irregular) This course examines the ways in which political struggles surrounding land, labor, and the environment have been shaped by gender relations in Latin America. Why and how do peasant-workers engage their political worlds and how are such struggles shaped by gender?

ANTH3533 Medical Anthropology (Irregular) Survey of the interrelationship of human biology, culture and environment as reflected in disease experience from an evolutionary and cross cultural perspective. Special emphasis on stress.

ANTH3543 Geographic Information Science (Sp) Computer assisted analysis and display of geographic resource data. Course develops the theory behind spatial data analysis techniques, and reinforces the theory with exercises that demonstrate its practical applications. Prior experience with computers and/or completion of GEOG 4523 (Computer Mapping) is useful but not a prerequisite. (Same as GEOS 3543)

ANTH3903 Topics in Anthropology (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in anthropology).

ANTH399VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4013 History of Anthropological Thought (Fa) Detailed consideration of anthropological theory through study of its historical development. The research paper in this course fulfills the Fulbright College research paper requirement for anthropology majors.

ANTH4033 Popular Culture (Irregular) Study of national and international varieties of popular culture, including music, dance, fashion, and the media. Emphasis will be given to both ethnographic approaches, which focus on the investigation of production and consumption of cultural forms and to cultural studies approaches, which see culture as a terrain of struggle.

ANTH4063 Women in Africa (Irregular) Diversity of women's life experiences throughout sub-Saharan Africa will be examined. The class will investigate a range of topics, from marriage and motherhood to prostitution and popular culture. A historical dimension will be present throughout the course, and perspectives from literature and film will also be incorporated. (Same as AAST 4063)

ANTH4083 African Popular Culture (Irregular) This class explores popular cultural expression across Africa. Topics range from hip hop and film, to second-hand clothing fashions and the media. We will consider how popular culture, while often inspired by global trends, is rooted in local circumstances and often reflects attempts to grapple with important issues.

ANTH4093 The Archeology of Death (Irregular) Study of the analysis and interpretation of archeological mortuary remains and sites. Key archeological and anthropological sources that have influenced major theoretical developments are reviewed.

ANTH4123 Ancient Middle East (Irregular) The archeology of the ancient Middle East with emphasis upon the interaction of ecology, technology and social structure as it pertains to domestication and urbanization.

ANTH4133 Settlements, Sites, and Models (Irregular) The modeling of potential archaeological resource locations within regions receives significant resources and funding from government and private sectors. The theoretical and methodological basis behind such models is examined, as are the history, controversies, key issues, individuals, and the important role of GIS technology and statistical methods. Prerequisite: ANTH 4543 or GEOG 4543 or ANTH 4553 or GEOG 4553.

ANTH4143 Ecological Anthropology (Irregular) Anthropological perspectives on the study of relationships among human populations and their ecosystems.

ANTH4183 Global Politics of Food (Irregular) This course explores the politics of food production, processing, transportation, and consumption on a global level. (Same as PLSC 4523)

ANTH4243 Archeology of the Midsouth (Irregular) Survey of prehistoric and protohistoric cultures of the lower Mississippi Valley and adjacent regions. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTH4256 Archeological Field Session (Su) Practical field and laboratory experiences in archeological research. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4263 Identity and Culture in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (Irregular) An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality.

ANTH4353 Laboratory Methods in Archeology (Irregular) Theory and practice of describing, analyzing, and reporting upon archeological materials.

ANTH4363 Museums, Material Culture, and Popular Imagination (Fa) Museums as ideological sites and thus as sites of potential contestation produce cultural and moral systems that legitimate existing social orders. This course will focus on strategies of representation and the continuous process of negotiating social and cultural hierarchies with and through objects that are displayed.

ANTH4443 Cultural Resource Management I (Sp) Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal and scientific management problems.

ANTH448V Individual Study of Anthropology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4513 African Religions: Gods, Witches, Ancestors (Irregular) An exploration of African religions from a variety of anthropological perspectives, exploring how religious experience is perceived and interpreted by adherents, highlighting the way in which individual and group identities are constructed, maintained and contested within religious contexts. Readings reflect the vast diversity of religious life in Africa.

ANTH4523 Dental Science (Fa) Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology.

ANTH4533 Middle East Cultures (Sp) Study of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East; ecology, ethnicity, economics, social organizations, gender, politics, religion, and patterns of social change. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4553 Introduction to Raster GIS (Fa) Theory, data structures, algorithms, and techniques behind raster-based geographical information systems. Through laboratory exercises and lectures multidisciplinary applications are examined in database creation, remotely sensed data handling, elevation models, and resource models using Boolean, map algebra, and other methods. (Same as GEOS 4553)

ANTH4563 Vector GIS (Sp) Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) applications in marketing, transportation, real estate, demographics, urban and regional planning, and related areas. Lectures focus on development of principles, paralleled by workstation-based laboratory exercises using Arc-node based software and relational data bases. (Same as GEOS 4583)

ANTH4583 Peoples and Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa (Fa) An exploration of the people and places of Africa from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Classic and contemporary works will be studied in order to underscore the unity and diversity of African cultures, as well as the importance African societies have played in helping us understand culture/society throughout the world.

ANTH4593 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (Sp) Introduction to navigation, georeferencing, and digital data collection using GPS receivers, data loggers, and laser technology for natural science and resource management. Components of NavStar Global Positioning system are used in integration of digital information into various GIS platforms with emphasis on practical applications. (Same as GEOS 4593)

ANTH4603 Landscape Archaeology (Fa) This course provides an introduction to the methods and theories of landscape archaeology. Topics include archaeological survey techniques, environmental and social processes recorded in the archaeological landscape, and analysis of ancient settlement and land use data to reveal changes in population, resource utilization, and environmental relationships.

ANTH4613 Primate Adaptation and Evolution (Fa) Introduction to the biology of the order of Primates. This course considers the comparative anatomy, behavioral ecology and paleontology of our nearest living relatives. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 (or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L). (Same as BIOL 4613)

ANTH4633 Archeological Prospecting & Remote Sensing (Odd years, Fa) Ground-based geophysical, aerial, and other remote sensing methods are examined for detecting, mapping, and understanding archeological and other deposits. These methods include magnetometry, resistivity, conductivity, radar, aerial photography, thermography, and multispectral scanning. Requires computer skills, field trips, and use of instruments.

ANTH4653 Advanced Raster GIS (Irregular) Advanced raster topics are examined beginning with a theoretical and methodological review of Tomlin's cartographic modeling principles. Topics vary and include Fourier methods, image processing, kriging, spatial statistics, principal components, fuzzy and regression modeling, and multi-criteria decision models. Several raster GIS programs are examined with links to statistical analysis software. Prerequisite: ANTH 4553 or GEOG 4553.

ANTH4803 Historical Archeology (Irregular) Review of the development of historical archeology and discussion of contemporary theory, methods, and substantive issues. Lab sessions on historic artifact identification and analysis.

ANTH4813 Ethnographic Approaches to the Past (Irregular) Review of the uses of ethnographic data in the reconstruction and interpretation of past cultures and cultural processes, with particular emphasis on the relationships between modern theories of culture and archeological interpretation.

ANTH4863 Quantitative Anthropology (Irregular) Introductory statistics course for anthropology students examines probability theory, nature of anthropological data, data graphics, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, test for means and variances, categorical and rank methods, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Lectures focus on theory methods; utilize anthropological data and a statistical software laboratory. (Same as GEOS 4863)

ANTH4903 Seminar in Anthropology (Irregular) Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4913 Topics of the Middle East (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH4923 Karl Marx: Life, Work, and Legacy (Irregular) This course examines the writings of Karl Marx. Students will read and discuss his major works, including Capital, The German Ideology, and Grundrisse. In order to understand Marx's writing, students will also explore his life, times, and legacy. (Same as PLSC 4923)

ANTH500V Advanced Problems in Anthropology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Individual research at graduate level on clearly defined problems or problem areas. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

ANTH5043 Advanced Vector Geographic Information Systems (Irregular) Advanced vector operations and analysis. Topics will include topological analysis, network analysis, geocoding, conflation, implications of source and product map scale, map generation, error mapping, and cartographic production. Prerequisite: (ANTH 4563 or GEOS 4583) or equivalent. (Same as ENDY 5033,GEOS 5033)

ANTH5053 Quaternary Environments (Fa) An interdisciplinary study of the Quaternary Period including dating methods, deposits, soils, climates, tectonics, and human adaptation. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. (Same as ENDY 5053,GEOS 5053)

ANTH5103 Applications of Cultural Method and Theory (Fa) Review of the nature and history of cultural anthropology; recent theories and practical implications and applications of various methods of acquiring, analyzing and interpreting cultural anthropological data.

ANTH5113 Anthropology of the City (Irregular) Examines cities as both products of culture, and sites where culture is made and received. Explores the implications of several pivotal urban and cultural trends and the way in which representations of the city have informed dominant ideas about city space, function, and feel.

ANTH5153 Topics in Anthropology (Irregular) Graduate level seminar with varied emphasis on topics relating to cultural anthropology.

ANTH5203 Applications of Archeological Method and Theory (Fa) Review of the nature and history of archeology; recent theories and practical implications and applications of various methods of acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting archeological data.

ANTH5263 Indians of Arkansas and the South (Odd years, Sp) Study of the traditional lifeways and prehistoric backgrounds of Indians living in the southern United States, including Arkansas.

ANTH5303 Applications of Method and Theory in Biological Anthropology (Irregular) Review of the nature and history of biological anthropology; recent theories and the practical implications and applications of various methods of acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data.

ANTH535V Topics in Physical Anthropology (Irregular) (1-6) Graduate level seminar with varied emphasis on topics relating to physical anthropology.

ANTH5413 Bioarcheology Seminar (Even years, Sp) Intensive coverage of bioarcheological method and theory with the context of both academic and cultural resources management research.

ANTH5423 Human Evolutionary Anatomy (Irregular) Paleobiologists reconstruct past lifeways and systematic relationships of our ancestors using comparative studies of bony morphology and associated soft tissues. This course surveys methods and theories used to infer function and phylogeny, and details relevant aspects of the anatomy of humans, living great apes, and fossil human ancestors. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and BIOL 1543. (Same as BIOL 5423)

ANTH5443 Cultural Resource Management I (Irregular) Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal, and scientific management problems.

ANTH561V Field Research in Archeology (Irregular) (1-6) Directed graduate level archeological fieldwork. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANTH5633 Advanced Archaeological Prospecting (Irregular) This course offers advanced training in applications of archaeological geophysics. Emphasis is placed on theory, instrument handling, uses of advanced software, and the interpretation of data from five principal methods: magnetometry, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, and thermal infrared imaging. Prerequisite: ANTH 4633.

ANTH600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ANTH6033 Society and Environment (Sp) This course examines the complex interrelationships between human societies and the natural environment. Drawing on diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in archaeology, ethnography, history, geography, and palaeo-environmental studies, readings and discussion will explore the co-production of social and environmental systems over time. (Same as ENDY 6033)

ANTH610V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

ANTH6813 Seminar: Cultural Anthropology (Irregular) Variable topics in Anthropology will be explored in depth. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH6823 Seminar: Archeology (Irregular) Various topics in Archeology will be explored in depth. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH6833 Seminar: Biological Anthropology (Irregular) Various topics in Biological Anthropology will be explored in depth. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Fa) (1-18)

(ARAB) Arabic

ARAB1016 Intensive Arabic I (Fa) Equivalent to 1003 and 1013. Stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Basic grammar is taught inductively through oral and written skills.

ARAB2013 Intermediate Arabic II (Sp) Continued development of speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

ARAB2016 Intensive Arabic II (Sp) Equivalent to 2013. Leads to greater oral comprehension and speaking ability and develops the more advanced reading and writing skills. Emphasizes morphology and syntax.

ARAB3016 Intensive Arabic III (Fa) Leads to greater facility in the spoken language and continues to develop reading and writing skills. Continued emphasis on morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: ARAB 2016.

ARAB4016 Intensive Arabic IV (Sp) Continued development of speaking, comprehension, reading, writing. Reading assignments introduce a variety of styles ranging from classical to modern in both prose and verse.

ARAB4023 Advanced Arabic I (Irregular) Development of advanced speaking and writing skills. Extensive reading and writing assignments and translating exercises from English into Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 4016.

ARAB4033 Advanced Arabic II (Irregular) Continued advanced speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: ARAB 4023.

ARAB4053 Arabic Readings (Irregular) Develops skill in description, analysis, and argumentation through weekly reading and writing assignments within a workshop atmosphere. Selected readings from various styles of standard Arabic, ranging from newspapers to literary texts.

ARAB470V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) May be offered in a topic not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed.

(ARCH) Architecture

ARCH1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Architecture Lecture (Sp, Fa) Introduction to architecture, emphasizing the origins and development of architecture and objective criteria for its evaluation. For the general student. May not be presented towards satisfaction of major requirements in either the B.Arch. or B.A. in architectural studies degrees.

ARCH1003H Honors Basic Course in the Arts: Architecture Lecture (Sp) Introduction to architecture, emphasizing the origins and development of architecture and objective criteria for its evaluation. For the general student. May not be presented towards satisfaction of major requirements in either the B.Arch. or B.A. in architectural studies degrees.

ARCH1011 Leadership By Design I (Fa) Introduces time management, study strategies, promotes solutions for maintaining personal health, and develops communication and leadership skills intended to benefit education, career, and the community.

ARCH1013 Diversity and Design (Fa) Explores the reciprocal relationship between diversity and design in America, investigating how race, gender, religion, ability, age, class, and location affect and are affected by the design of media, products, architecture, and cities/regions. Positive and negative effects of diversity and design are discussed.

ARCH1013H Honors Diversity and Design (Fa) Explores the reciprocal relationship between diversity and design in America, investigating how race, gender, religion, ability, age, class, and location affect and are affected by the design of media, products, architecture, and cities/regions. Positive and negative effects of diversity and design are discussed.

ARCH1014 Architectural Design I (Sp, Fa) Seeing, drawing: analysis and graphic communication. Subject and object: expression and craft. Studio and seminars 12 hours per week. Corequisite: ARCH 1212.

ARCH1021 Leadership by Design II (Sp) Introduces time management, study strategies, promotes solutions for maintaining personal health, and develops communication and leadership skills intended to benefit education, career, and the community. Continuation of ARCH 1011.

ARCH1024 Architectural Design II (Sp, Su) Ideation, visualization, representation. Project sequence designed to develop perceptual and conceptual abilities; formal and spatial composition and synthesis. Studio and seminars 12 hours per week. Corequisite: ARCH 1222. Prerequisite: ARCH 1014.

ARCH1212 Design Methods I (Sp, Fa) Interdisciplinary introduction to basic principles of design, from furniture and the room to buildings and the natural landscape. Urbanism and the public realm. Lecture 1 hour per week. Corequisite: ARCH 1014.

ARCH1222 Design Methods II (Sp, Su) Theoretical, formal, and constructive principles and their impact in the design disciplines, modernism and after. Introduction to the intellectual and philosophical foundations of design theory. Lecture 1 hour per week. Corequisite: ARCH 1024. Prerequisite: ARCH 1212.

ARCH2016 Architectural Design III (Fa) Introduction of formal principles and strategies used in space making, focusing on the development of plans and sections. Precedents and the understanding of them through analysis and syntheses are used as a means of examining the past and the present while providing a framework from which personal design sensibilities can evolve. Corequisite: ARCH 2114 and ARCH 2233. Prerequisite: ARCH 1024.

ARCH2026 Architectural Design IV (Sp) An elaboration of space-making, addressing three-dimensional aspects of form-making, including the influence of structural systems, articulation of the vertical section, and exterior expression; the role of site as a generator of form; and the overarching importance of technics, including the materiality of space, structure, and light. Corequisite: ARCH 2124. Prerequisite: ARCH 2016.

ARCH2114 Architecture Technology I (Fa) Introduction to the fundamentals of building systems technology. Emphasis on the interrelationships of site, environmental, structure, and enclosure systems. Focus on the integration of all systems within the conceptual and functional organization of the building and its context. Corequisite: ARCH 2016. Prerequisite: ARCH 1024 and ARCH 1222.

ARCH2114H Honors Architecture Technology I (Fa) Introduction to the fundamentals of building systems technology. Emphasis on the interrelationships of site, environmental, structure, and enclosure systems. Focus on the integration of all systems within the conceptual and functional organization of the building and its context. Corequisite: ARCH 2016. Prerequisite: ARCH 1024 and ARCH 1222.

ARCH2124 Architecture Technology II (Sp) Study of force systems, section properties, equilibrium and stability of building structures. Relationship of material properties and structural member behavior to the forces acting on the building structural system. Specific topics are: stress/strain relationships of various materials; types of stress; shear and moment diagrams; design and analysis of simple wood and steel framing systems; introduction to indeterminate structures; and use of structural analysis computer programs. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week. Corequisite: ARCH 2026. Prerequisite: ARCH 2114 and PHYS 1044.

ARCH2124H Honors Architecture Technology II (Sp) Study of force systems, section properties, equilibrium and stability of building structures. Relationship of material properties and structural member behavior to the forces acting on the building structural system. Specific topics are: stress/strain relationships of various materials; types of stress; shear and moment diagrams; design and analysis of simple wood and steel framing systems; introduction to indetermine structures; and use of structural analysis computer programs. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week. Corequisite: ARCH 2026. Prerequisite: ARCH 2114 and PHYS 1044.

ARCH2233 History of Architecture I (Fa) Critical study and analysis of world architecture from ancient times through the Middle Ages, comprising the ancient Americas, Asia, Mesopotamia, and Egypt; Classical, Byzantine, and Islamic architecture and vernacular design; and the early Christian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods.

ARCH2233H Honors History of Architecture I (Fa) Critical study and analysis of world architecture from ancient times through the Middle Ages, comprising the ancient Americas, Asia, Mesopotamia, and Egypt; Classical, Byzantine, and Islamic architecture and vernacular design; and the early Christian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods.

ARCH2243 History of Architecture II (Sp) Critical study and analysis of world architecture from the fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. Encompasses early modern Europe (Renaissance, Baroque, and Neoclassical) as well as two or more of the following: colonial New Spain, early modern Japan, and/or early modern Islamic empires in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Vernacular American building is surveyed as well as architecture in the nineteenth-century, including Beaux-Arts design and the introduction of industrial materials. Prerequisite for architecture majors only: ARCH 2233.

ARCH2243H Honors History of Architecture II (Sp) Critical study and analysis of world architecture from the fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. Encompasses early modern Europe (Renaissance, Baroque, and Neoclassical) as well as two or more of the following: colonial New Spain, early modern Japan, and/or early modern Islamic empires in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Vernacular American building is surveyed as well as architecture in the nineteenth-century, including Beaux-Arts design and the introduction of industrial materials. Prerequisite for architecture majors only: ARCH 2233.

ARCH2993 Art and Culture in Italy (Sp, Fa) The evolution of culture and aesthetics and their immediate relationship with the creation of Italy's masterpieces in art and architecture. Includes site visits and lectures. Offered in the Rome study abroad semester.

ARCH3016 Architectural Design V (Fa) Emphasis on issues of design process, exploration of internal and external determinants of form and the integration of appropriate technologies in design solutions. Corequisite: ARCH 3134. Prerequisite: ARCH 2026.

ARCH3026 Architectural Design VI (Sp) Studio-based analysis and design of structural and enclosure systems for buildings with particular emphasis on systems interface and application within the context of design exercises. Investigations of the appropriate use of materials and assemblies for varied programmatic and environmental criteria. Twelve hours of studio each week. Prerequisite: ARCH 3016.

ARCH303V Special Projects (Irregular) (1-6) Individual or group investigation in research, visual communication, history, or design concerning special interests of student or faculty.

ARCH303VH Honors Special Projects (Irregular) (1-6) Individual or group investigation in research, visual communication, history, or design concerning special interests of student or faculty.

ARCH3134 Architectural Technology III (Fa) Emphasis on structural, mechanical, plumbing, electrical, fire protection, natural and electric lighting systems and environmental considerations of energy usage, code requirements, and system selection and integration. Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week. Corequisite: ARCH 3016. Prerequisite: ARCH 2124.

ARCH3134H Honors Architectural Technology III (Fa) Emphasis on structural, mechanical, plumbing, electrical, fire protection, natural and electric lighting systems and environmental considerations of energy usage, code requirements, and system selection and integration. Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week. Corequisite: ARCH 3016. Prerequisite: ARCH 2124.

ARCH3743 Furniture Design (Irregular) Design concepts and techniques to acquaint the student with the design of furniture; analysis of function, development of design and construction of small pieces of furniture.

ARCH4016 Architectural Design VII (Fa) Emphasis on issues of typology, context and technological suitability as sources of theoretical and developmental responses. Prerequisite: ARCH 3026.

ARCH4023 Advanced Architectural Studies (Sp, Fa) Advanced seminars in subjects to special interest to students and faculty.

ARCH4023H Honors Advanced Architectural Studies (Sp, Fa) Advanced seminars in subjects to special interest to students and faculty.

ARCH4026 Architectural Design VIII (Sp) Continuation of Architectural Design VII. Prerequisite: ARCH 4016.

ARCH4116 Architectural Design - Rome (Sp, Fa) Investigation of complex design problems in the context of the city of Rome, utilizing advanced issues in architectural design and planning.

ARCH4126 Architectural Design Mexico (Su) Introduces a complex social and physical urban condition through a process of formal analysis and design executed in Mexico City, augmented by an intense graphic investigation of urban form encountered through related field trips to the distinct cultural and geographic regions of Mexico.

ARCH4154 Architectural Technology V (Sp, Fa) Introduction to high-rise, specialty and contemporary structural systems. Computer analysis of structural systems. Advanced detailing and integration of building systems. Study of acoustics and intelligent building systems. Introduction to organization, preparation, and context of construction drawings. Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week.

ARCH4154H Honors Architectural Technology V (Sp, Fa) Introduction to high-rise, speciality and contemporary structural systems. Computer analysis of structural systems. Advanced detailing and integration of building systems. Study of acoustics and intelligent building systems. Introduction to organization, preparation, and context of construction drawings. Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory exercises in principles and practices of architectural technology each week.

ARCH4433 History of Architecture III (Fa) Critical study and analysis of the history and theories of modern architecture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233 and ARCH 2243.

ARCH4433H Honors History of Architecture III (Fa) Critical study and analysis of the history and theories of modern architecture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233 and ARCH 2243.

ARCH4483 Architecture of the Americas (Irregular) Study of the development of architecture in the Americas from the Pre-Columbian cultures to the present day. Lecture and slides 3 hours per week.

ARCH4483H Honors Architecture of the Americas (Irregular) Study of the development of architecture in the Americas from the Pre-Columbian cultures to the present day. Lecture and slides 3 hours per week.

ARCH4523 Architectural Theory (Sp) Introduction to architectural theories and their relationship to modern historiography. Case studies are employed for the critical evaluation of significant texts and the discernment of concepts embedded in textual structures. Reading theory through established historical categories establishes critical insight to the original deployment, negation and resurfacing of architectural theories. Prerequisites: ARCH 2233, ARCH 2243, and ARCH 4433.

ARCH4553 Modern Architecture in Mexico (Su) Overview of the emergence, growth and trends that define the ongoing evolution of modern architecture in Mexico from the first decades of the 20th century to contemporary practice. Offered in the Mexico study abroad semester.

ARCH4610 Architecture Cooperative Education I (Irregular) A practicum which introduces and engages the student in the practice and application of the profession. Prerequisite: completion of all third year program requirements, 2.5 minimum GPA and permission of the faculty.

ARCH4653 Architecture of the City (Sp, Fa) Analysis of Rome's urban form and historical and theoretical information in support of the students' experience. Includes site visits and lectures. Offered in the Rome study abroad semester.

ARCH4723H Honors Architectural Research Methods (Fa) Investigation into the practical, theoretical, and methodological strategies necessary for embarking upon architectural inquiry and discourse at a sophisticated level, for instance, in the form of a year-long thesis or independent project. Practical issues of method, such as research skills, literature review, and argument analysis are examined. The classic range of tools for interpreting architecture are surveyed from single-cause explanations (e.g., formalism) to more recent multi-causal theories (e.g., Semiotics, Deconstruction, Post-colonial theory, etc.) for architectural design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233, ARCH 2243, and ARCH 4433.

ARCH5016 Degree Project I (Sp) Degree project development dependent upon the synthesis of knowledge and application of critical thinking addressing architectural issues at multiple scales.

ARCH5016H Honors Degree Project I (Sp) Degree project development dependent upon the synthesis of knowledge and application of critical thinking addressing architectural issues at multiple scales.

ARCH5026 Degree Project II (Su) Degree project resolution including demonstrated skill in generating design ideas supported by clear understanding of issues resulting in comprehensive development and presentation of architectural issues at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 5016.

ARCH5026H Honors Degree Project II (Su) Degree project resolution including demonstrated skill in generating design ideas supported by clear understanding of issues resulting in comprehensive development and presentation of architectural issues at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 5016.

ARCH5253 Architectural Structures Seminar (Irregular) Advanced discussion, investigation, design, and analysis of structural systems, forms, and materials as determinants of architectural design. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARCH5314 Architectural Professional Practice (Fa) Study of role and responsibility of the architect, owner, and contractor relationships; professional ethics; organization of the architect's office; contracts and other documents; risk management strategies; and the preparation of the technical specifications and bidding documents of the Project Manual. Prerequisite: ARCH 4026.

ARCH5493 History of Urban Form (Irregular) The city is explored as the primary context for design practice and theory. A few themes, e.g., the struggle between internal and external determinants of form, will frame the examination of exemplary urban projects. Primary focus on Classical through Baroque periods, tracing precedents from these periods into contemporary practice. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233 and ARCH 2243 and ARCH 4433.

ARCH5933 Preservation and Restoration (Irregular) History of the preservation and restoration movement in Europe and the U.S.; its relation to the contemporary urban planning and renewal. Modern economic and administrative techniques of preservation. Participation in history surveys at regional and state levels. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233, ARCH 2243, and ARCH 4433.

(ARED) Art Education

ARED3603 Public School Art for Elementary Schools (Sp, Fa) Selection, preparation, and use of instructional materials for art in the elementary school. Artistic development of the child and implications to learning in art and other academic areas. Prerequisite: ARTS 1003 and ARHS 1003 and admission to teacher education.

ARED3613 Public School Art I (Irregular) Selection, preparation and use of instructional materials in elementary and secondary schools. For students seeking teaching certification in art. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013 and ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323 and ARTS 2013.

ARED3643 Teaching Art in Elementary Schools (Fa) Methods and materials used in teaching elementary school art. Prerequisite: ARED 3613.

ARED3653 Teaching Art in Secondary Schools (Sp) Methods and materials used in teaching secondary school art. Prerequisite: ARED 3603 or ARED 3613.

ARED4633 Individual Research in Art Education (Sp, Fa) Independent study in specific areas of art education. Prerequisite: 6 hours of art education.

ARED476V Student Teaching in Art (Sp, Fa) (6-12) A minimum of 6 weeks will be spent in an off-campus school. During this time the student teacher will have an opportunity under supervision to observe, to teach and participate in other activities involving the school and community. Prerequisite: BFA degree in Art Education.

(ARHS) Art History

ARHS1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Art Lecture (Sp, Su, Fa) A general introduction to the visual arts. Lectures on theory and criticism, demonstrations, films, and slides. Three hours a week plus attendance at specified programs and exhibits. May not be presented toward satisfaction of the B.A. fine arts requirement by art majors.

ARHS1003H Honors Basic Course in the Arts: Art Lecture (Irregular) A general introduction to the visual arts. Lectures on theory and criticism, demonstrations, films, slides. Three hours a week plus attendance at specified programs and exhibits. May not be presented toward satisfaction of the B.A. fine arts requirement by art majors.

ARHS2913 Art History Survey I (Fa) Survey of art works from Stone Age through Medieval.

ARHS2923 Art History Survey II (Sp) Survey of art works from Renaissance to the present.

ARHS4813 The History of Photography (Irregular) Survey of photography from 1685 to present.

ARHS4823 History of Graphic Design (Irregular) Survey of graphic design history from 1850 to the present. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4833 Ancient Art (Irregular) Study of selections from the visual arts of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, or Rome. Prerequisite: ARHS 2913.

ARHS4833H Honors Ancient Art (Irregular) Study of selections from the visual arts of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, or Rome. Prerequisite: ARHS 2913.

ARHS4843 Medieval Art (Irregular) Study of Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic styles. Prerequisite: ARHS 2913.

ARHS4843H Honors Medieval Art (Irregular) Study of Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic styles. Prerequisite: ARHS 2913.

ARHS4853 Italian Renaissance Art (Irregular) Study of Proto-Renaissance, Early, High Renaissance, and Mannerist styles in Italy. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4853H Honors Italian Renaissance Art (Irregular) Study of Proto-Renaissance, Early, High Renaissance, and Mannerist styles in Italy. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4863 Northern Renaissance Art (Irregular) Study of Late Gothic and Renaissance styles in the Netherlands, Germany, and France. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4863H Honors Northern Renaissance Art (Irregular) Study of Late Gothic and Renaissance styles in the Netherlands, Germany, and France. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4873 Baroque Art (Irregular) Study of art styles of the 17th and 18 centuries, primarily in Italy, Spain, France, Flanders, and the Netherlands. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4873H Honors Baroque Art (Irregular) Study of art styles of the 17th and 18 centuries, primarily in Italy, Spain, France, Flanders, and the Netherlands. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4883 19th Century European Art (Even years, Fa) Study of Neo-Classical, Romanticist, Realist, Impressionist, and Post-Impressionist styles. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4883H Honors 19th Century European Art (Even years, Fa) Study of Neo-Classical, Romanticist, Realist, Impressionist, and Post-Impressionist styles. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4893 20th Century European Art (Odd years, Sp) Study of the major styles and movements of the century, including Cubism, Fauvism, German Expressionism, and Surrealism. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4893H Honors 20th Century European Art (Odd years, Sp) Study of the major styles and movements of the century, including Cubism, Fauvism, German Expressionism, and Surrealism. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4913 American Art to 1900 (Odd years, Fa) The visual arts in the United States from their beginning in Colonial times through the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4913H Honors American Art to 1900 (Odd years, Fa) The visual arts in the United States from their beginning in Colonial times through the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4923 American Art Since 1900 (Even years, Sp) The visual arts in the United States from the turn of the century to the contemporary era. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4923H Honors American Art Since 1900 (Even years, Sp) The visual arts in the United States from the turn of the century to the contemporary era. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923.

ARHS4933 Seminar in Contemporary Art (Irregular) Study of styles and major trends in the visual arts since 1945. Prerequisite: ARHS 2923 and ARHS 4923.

ARHS4943 Seminar in Art Criticism (Fa) Study and problems in the criticism of art forms and styles. Prerequisite: 9 hours of art history.

ARHS4943H Honors Seminar in Art Criticism (Fa) Study and problems in the criticism of art forms and styles. Prerequisite: 9 hours of art history.

ARHS4963 Individual Research in Art History (Sp, Fa) Independent study in specific areas of art history and criticism. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Art History.

ARHS4963H Honors Individual Research in Art History (Sp, Fa) Independent study in specific areas of art history and criticism. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Art History.

ARHS4983 Special Topics in Art History (Irregular) Subject matter not covered in regularly offered courses, and relating to the history of art before the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: ARHS 2913 or ARHS 2923. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARHS6933 Graduate Research In Art History (Sp) Independent study in specific areas of art history and criticism.

ARHS6943 Seminar: Critical Thought in Art (Fa) Explore topics of concern to the studio artist involving underlying concepts and purposes of art as well as models and methods for the analysis of art. Course based on discussions of selected readings, prepared papers and seminar reports. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

(ARSC) Arts and Sciences

ARSC1001 Fulbright Perspectives (Fa) Open to incoming freshman and transfer students participating in the university's First Year Experience. Available for credit only.

ARSC300V Study Abroad (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-15) Open to undergraduate students studying abroad in officially sanctioned programs. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

ARSC310V Cooperative Education (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Required of participants in cooperative education work assignments. Available for credit only. May be repeated for up to 36 hours of degree credit.

ARSC500V Study Abroad (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Open to graduate students studying abroad in officially sanctioned programs. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

(ARTS) Art

ARTS1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Art Studio (Sp, Su, Fa) Provides experience through participation in the arts.

ARTS1013 Drawing Fundamentals I (Sp, Fa) Problems dealing with materials and techniques of drawing, including basic concepts of line, perspective, and value.

ARTS1313 Two-Dimensional Design (Sp, Fa) Studio problems in the use of line, shape, texture, value, and color and their relationships.

ARTS1323 Three-Dimensional Design (Sp, Fa) Studio problems with the elements of three-dimensional design: structure, space, form, surface, and their relationship.

ARTS2003 Drawing Fundamentals II (Sp, Fa) Continuation of Drawing Fundamentals. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013.

ARTS2013 Figure Drawing I (Sp, Fa) Continuation of drawing fundamentals with emphasis upon human figure studies. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013.

ARTS2313 Computer Applications in Art (Sp, Fa) Introduction to digital imaging in the visual arts. Beginning instruction in digital image creation, manipulation and processing. Introduction to input and output peripherals, computer graphic software programs and work in the digital visual arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313.

ARTS3023 Drawing III (Fa) Advanced studies and problems in drawing techniques and materials. Prerequisite: ARTS 2003 and ARTS 2013.

ARTS3103 Painting I (Sp, Fa) An exploration of different ways of articulating visual forms on a picture plane, using common materials and procedures. Pre- or Corequisite: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 2013 or ARCH 1025.

ARTS3113 Painting II (Sp, Fa) An expanded use of materials, procedures, subject matter, and approaches. Prerequisite: ARTS 3103.

ARTS3123 Painting: Water Media (Sp) Introductory course presenting basic materials and techniques of watercolor, gouache, and acrylic painting. Form and composition to be studied through observation and imagination. Traditional techniques as well as experimentation and personal expression are to be explored. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013 and ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323.

ARTS3133 Figure Painting (Sp) Introduction to representational and interpretive figure painting and to contemporary issues in figurative painting. The model as well as other visual sources will be used as a basis for observation, interpretation and invention. Prerequisites: ARTS 2013, ARTS 3103.

ARTS3203 Sculpture I: Fundamentals of Modeling, Carving & Casting (Fa) An introduction to fundamental additive and subtractive sculpture techniques and methods of seeing and working that give expression to material form. Beginning techniques in modeling, carving, mold-making, and basic casting are demonstrated. Lectures, readings, and critiques will develop student awareness of traditional building techniques which inform contemporary sculpture practices. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323 and ARTS 2013.

ARTS3213 Sculpture II: Construction Methods & Alternative Media (Sp) A focus on material sensitivity through thoughtful and skillful additive approaches. Woodworking as well as construction techniques in alternative media are introduced as tools to examine structural and spatial possibilities. Through examining and questioning the interplay of form, material, technique, and content, students will further develop their own critique skills. Prerequisite: ARTS 3203.

ARTS3333 Color Studies (Fa) Investigation of color qualities and relationships through research and studio problems. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323 and ARTS 2013.

ARTS3363 Graphic Design I (Sp, Fa) An overview of design principles and the application of design processes to posters, logos, stationery, and publication design. Conceptual development and visual and technical problem solving skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013 and ARTS 2313.

ARTS3403 Etching I (Sp) Introduction to intaglio and relief. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and (ARTS 2003 or ARTS 2013 or ARTS 2023).

ARTS3413 Etching II (Sp) Advanced work in intaglio or relief. Students select one area for study. Intaglio emphasizes working with copper plates and color printing. Background in color studies preferred but not mandatory. Prerequisite: ARTS 3403 or ARTS 3463.

ARTS3423 Printmaking-Lithography (Fa) Introduction to lithography with emphasis on stone lithographic techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and (ARTS 2003 or ARTS 2013 or ARTS 2023).

ARTS3433 Lithography II (Fa) Advanced study with emphasis on color printing and plate lithography techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 3423.

ARTS3443 Serigraphy I (Su) Introduction to serigraphy techniques, including cut stencil, resist methods, and photosensitized screens. Some knowledge of photography preferred, but not mandatory. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and (ARTS 2003 or ARTS 2013 or ARTS 2023).

ARTS3453 Serigraphy II (Su) Continuation of the study and use of serigraphy techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 3443.

ARTS3463 Introduction to Printmaking (Su) Introduces the student to printmaking through primary methods used in relief, serigraphic, intaglio, and lithographic techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1013 and (ARTS 2003 or ARTS 2013 or ARTS 2023).

ARTS3503 Ceramics: Handbuilding I (Fa) This is an introductory course in ceramic sculpture focusing on basic handbuilding techniques and basic ceramic processes including clay mixing , glaze mixing, and low temperature gas and electric firing techniques. Pre- or Corequisite: ARTS 1013 and ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323.

ARTS3523 Ceramics: Wheelthrowing I (Sp) This is an introductory course in ceramics focusing on basic functional wheelthrowing techniques and basic ceramic processes including clay mixing, glaze mixing, and low-temperature gas and electric firing techniques. Pre-or Corequisite: ARTS 1013 and ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323.

ARTS3533 Ceramics: Wheelthrowing II (Fa) This course is an intermediate course in wheelthrowing and some handbuilding. A primary emphasis is on clay body and glaze calculation, and understanding the processes of firing low, high, and atmospheric kilns. Prerequisite: ARTS 3503 and ARTS 3523.

ARTS3543 Ceramics: Slip-Casting (Sp) This is an intermediate course in ceramic sculpture focusing on concept based object making. The techniques taught are mold-making and slip-casting, along with an advanced understanding of clay mixing, glaze mixing, low and high temperature gas, salt/soda, and electric firing techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 3503 and ARTS 3523.

ARTS3803 Photography I (Sp, Fa) Beginning photography. Introduction to B & W materials, techniques, and theory. Development of visual ideas through assignments, critiques, slide lectures, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313.

ARTS3813 Alternative Photographic Processes (Sp, Su, Fa) Advanced B & W materials, techniques, and theory. Introduction to "non-traditional" materials, techniques, and theory (Cyanotype, Van Dyck Brownprint, Gum Biochromate, KWIK-PRINT, etc.). Assignments, critiques, slide lectures, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803.

ARTS4023 Figure Drawing II (Irregular) Advanced study of the figure with emphasis on figure structure and its relationship to pictorial form in drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 2013.

ARTS404V Special Problems in Drawing (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual projects in drawing arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 3023. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4143 Painting III (Sp, Fa) Concentration of the coordination of the technical, esthetic, and creative aspects of painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 3113.

ARTS4163 Painting IV (Sp, Fa) Continued advanced concentration on the coordination of the technical, aesthetic, and creative aspects of painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 4143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS417V Special Problems in Painting (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Individual technique and subject matter projects to be arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite: ARTS 4143 or ARTS 4153. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4213 Mixed Media & Spatial Context (Irregular) An exploration in assemblage, installation, environmental art, light, and kinetics as they apply to contemporary sculptural language. Specific problems utilizing various media are preceded by readings, lectures, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: ARTS 3203.

ARTS4223 Advanced Sculpture (Irregular) A directed analysis of form and its relationship to content based on the development of work in students' medium of choice. Students will acquire the technical skills needed to meet personal vision through guidance of the instructor. Research evidenced in work, discussions, and critiques is emphasized. Prerequisite: ARTS 3203 and ARTS 3213.

ARTS423V Special Problems in Sculpture (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Individual projects in sculpture with emphasis on materials exploration. Prerequisite: ARTS 4223. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4333 Bookmaking (Irregular) Introduction to the creation of unique, limited edition artist's bookworks -- with emphasis on technical knowledge and conceptual understanding of the book form as a means of artistic expression.

ARTS4343 Advanced Design (Sp) Studio problems in the interrelationships of two and three-dimensional elements in traditional, experimental, and digital media. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1323 and ARTS 2313.

ARTS435V Special Problems in Design (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Extended problems in an area of interest in pure or functional design; encouraged use of imaginative materials. Prerequisite: ARTS 4343. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4363 Graphic Design Typography (Irregular) Studies include type as form, typographic contrast principles, legibility, text organization and hierarchy, and experimental approaches to typographic design. Overview of typographic history is included. Current computer software applications utilized. Prerequisite: ARTS 3363.

ARTS4373 Graphic Design: Symbols (Irregular) Emphasis on the development of logos, pictograms, symbols, and conceptual symbolism, with a study of the history of symbol generation. Current computer software applications utilized. Prerequisite: ARTS 3363.

ARTS4383 Graphic Design: Layout (Irregular) Advanced explorations of organizational principles and design processes applied to print media. Contemporary design practices and graphic design history are studied. Current computer software applications utilized. Prerequisite: ARTS 3363.

ARTS439V Special Problems in Graphic Design (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Advanced individual projects in graphic design. Prerequisite: Any 4000 level ARTS visual design course except ARTS 4343. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4463 Etching III (Sp, Fa) Continued study of intaglio or relief. Prerequisite: ARTS 3413.

ARTS4473 Lithography III (Fa) Continued advanced study of lithography techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 3433.

ARTS4483 Printmaking IV (Sp, Fa) Continued advanced study in various printmaking media. Prerequisite: ARTS 4463 or ARTS 4473.

ARTS4573 Advanced Ceramics (Sp, Fa) This is an advanced course where any ceramic technique can be used. The course continues advanced study of glaze and clay calculation, and kiln design, building, and firing. Prerequisite: ARTS 3503 and ARTS 3523 and ARTS 3533 and ARTS 3543. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS458V Special Problems in Ceramics (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Individual projects in ceramic techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 3503 or ARTS 3523. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS459V Individual Instruction (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Special projects on an arranged basis for advanced students in any area of art in which the catalog sequence of courses has been completed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4613 Visual Design: Web I (Fa) This course introduces students to the World Wide Web and the technologies and practices involved in creating a successful Web presence. Discussions include interactivity, usability and accessibility with an emphasis on handcoding standards-based XHTML and cascading style sheets and a special attention to graphic design standards. Prerequisite: ARTS 3363.

ARTS4623 Visual Design: Web II (Sp) This course will study advanced techniques in creating successful Web sites, including information architecture, SHTML and cascading style sheets, Web animation, digital photography, sequential storytelling and actual client work. Experimentation in concept, style and format are encouraged as students scrutinize the limitations and potential of design for the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: ARTS 4613.

ARTS4653 Elements of Animation (Fa) This course explores the fundamentals of sequential imaging and storytelling from traditional methods through modern animation software. computer based projects will make use of digital and video cameras, video editing software, Web animation software and a 3D animation package. Prerequisites: ARTS 1013, ARTS 1313, ARTS 2313.

ARTS4663 Visual Design: Motion Design (Irregular) In this course, students will explore motion graphic design as it combines 2D and 3D animation, typography, video footage photography and sound. The projects will explore elements of storytelling, moving compositions and animation principles that focus on Web and DVD delivery, using mainly Adobe Premier and After Effects. Prerequisite: ARTS 4653.

ARTS469V Special Problems In Interactive Design (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Students work on special projects on an individual basis with instructor, exploring innovative interface design, in-depth projects potentially exploring solutions to and awareness of social issues, with various types of media, from DVD and digital video to Web and motion graphics. Cross-discipline collaboration is encouraged. Prerequisites: ARTS 4613 and ARTS 4623 and ARTS 4653. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4813 Digital Photography (Irregular) Introduction to digital photography production, techniques and theory. Digital input from scanning (flatbed & slide/negative), digital cameras, video and internet sources. Computer assisted manipulation of imagery for correction and abstraction. Output to a digital printing systems, analog systems (film recorder), servers and Internet. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803.

ARTS4823 Color Photography I (Irregular) Introduction to color production. Color materials, techniques and theory. Direct reversal transparencies and prints, color negative processing and printing, and manipulation of color materials. Assignments, demonstrations, critiques, and lectures. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803.

ARTS4833 Advanced Photography (Fa) Individual problems in photography with optional study in areas of color, slide production, and photography application to other art media. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803.

ARTS484V Special Problems in Photography (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Individual instruction for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Special projects in photography designated by students in collaboration with faculty. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803 and (ARTS 3813 or ARTS 4823 or ARTS 4833). May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4853 Documentary Photography (Irregular) This course will introduce students to a variety of methods used in the area of documentary photography in order to give them the conceptual and technical skills necessary to create extended projects that focus on documenting and visually exploring subjects in an in-depth manner. Prerequisite: ARTS 3803.

ARTS490VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Special problems in studio, art history, art criticism, art education, or a combination of these. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ARTS491V Internships in Art (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Credit for practical experience gained through internships in studio art, art history, gallery practices and/or art education. Report required from intern and field supervisor on significant accomplishments and/or progress. Prerequisite: junior standing and art major. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS4921 Senior Portfolio Review (Sp, Fa) Capstone course. A portfolio of creative work and supporting artist statement will be prepared and presented to the Art faculty in a formal presentation. Prerequisite: Art Majors only. Requires junior, senior or graduate standing.

ARTS493V Fine Arts Gallery Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Study all aspects of operating the Fine Arts Gallery. Research and preparation for exhibitions, organize and install exhibits, care of art works, create and distribute publicity, arrange interviews with newspapers, and other media.

ARTS494V Graphic Design Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Credit for practical experience gained through internship in graphic design. Report required form intern and field supervisor on progress and significant accomplishments. 3 credit hours per semester. Prerequisite: Any 4000 level ARTS visual design course except ARTS 4343. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS495V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) May be offered in a subject not specifically covered by the courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ARTS498V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ARTS5013 Graduate Drawing (Fa) Graduate level study of drawing materials and techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS5901 Graduate Critique (Sp, Su, Fa) Art faculty review and critique of M.F.A. student's art works. Prerequisite: Admission into the M.F.A. program.

ARTS5912 Graduate Seminar in Studio Art (Sp, Fa) Examination and analysis of current issues in contemporary visual art. The relationship of current theoretical literature to studio practice will be explored through presentations and discussions of graduate student research. Prerequisite: Admission to MFA program.

ARTS601V Master of Fine Arts Exhibition (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Production and presentation of a one person exhibition of art work. The M.F.A. candidate will be responsible for making three acceptable slide sets of the exhibition and exhibition statements. Prerequisite: M.F.A. candidacy.

ARTS602V Graduate Drawing (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in drawing techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS612V Graduate Painting (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in painting techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS622V Graduate Sculpture (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in sculpture techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS632V Graduate Design (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in two and three dimensional design. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS642V Graduate Printmaking (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in printmaking techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS652V Graduate Ceramics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in ceramic techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS682V Graduate Photography (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Individual problems in photography. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS692V Special Studio Problems (Irregular) (1-6) Individual problems in studio areas on arranged basis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ARTS695V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) Subject matter not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

(ASTR) Astronomy

ASTR2001M Honors Survey of the Universe Laboratory (Fa) An introduction to the content and fundamental properties of the cosmos. Topics include planets and other objects of the solar system, the sun, normal stars and interstellar medium, birth and death of stars, neutron stars, and black holes. Pre- or Corequisite: ASTR 2003 or ASTR 2003H.

ASTR2001L Survey of the Universe Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Daytime and nighttime observing with telescopes and indoor exercises on selected topics. Pre- or Corequisite: ASTR 2003.

ASTR2003 Survey of the Universe (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to the content and fundamental properties of the cosmos. Topics include planets and other objects of the solar system, the Sun, normal stars and interstellar medium, birth and death of stars, neutron stars, pulsars, black holes, the Galaxy, clusters of galaxies, and cosmology. Corequisite: ASTR 2001L or ASTR 2001M.

ASTR2003H Honors Survey of the Universe (Fa) An introduction to the content and fundamental properties of the cosmos. Topics include planets and other objects of the solar system, the Sun, normal stars and interstellar medium, birth and death of stars, neutron stars, pulsars, black holes, the Galaxy, clusters of galaxies, and cosmology. Corequisite: ASTR 2001M. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ASTR301V Observational Astronomy (Irregular) (1-3) Individual experimental or observational problems studied with small telescopes, cameras, and other basic equipment. No credit is given toward a B.S. degree in physics. Prerequisite: ASTR 2003 or ASTR 3003.

ASTR3033 Solar System Astronomy (Irregular) Basic course on state of knowledge of solar system astronomy, especially designed for students in B.A. Physics program or as an elective for undergraduates in related areas. Prerequisite: PHYS 2033 and PHYS 2031L or PHYS 2074.

ASTR4013 Astrophysics (Even years, Sp) Introduction to astrophysics for seniors. The course covers stellar evolution, interstellar medium, galactic nucleogenesis and observational cosmology. Prerequisite: PHYS 3614 or CHEM 3504.

ASTR5013 Astrophysics (Odd years, Fa) Introduction to astrophysics. The course covers stellar evolution, interstellar medium, galactic nucleogenesis and observational cosmology. Prerequisite: PHYS 3614 or CHEM 3504.

ASTR5033 Planetary Systems (Fa) The nature of the solar system and other planetary systems as deduced from observations and theoretical modeling. Structure and evolution of terrestrial and Jovian planets and their satellites. Planetary atmospheres, magnetospheres, and the solar wind; planetary interiors. Theoretical and observed properties of exoplanetary systems; astrobiology.

(BENG) Biological Engineering

BENG1012 Biological Engineering Design Fundamentals (Irregular) Introduction to the profession of Biological Engineering including a definition, and demonstration through field trips, guest speakers, examples of job opportunities and internships. Basic engineering methodologies, including analysis and design, as applied to biological systems. Introduction to problem solving, data analysis, report writing, presentations, and engineering record keeping. Group activities and team design efforts. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

BENG1022 Biological Engineering Design Studio I (Irregular) Practice of biological engineering design in the Biological Engineering Design Studio. Design projects explore the unique problems associated with engineering applied to biological systems. Group activities to teach teamwork skills in the context of engineering practice, including reporting, project management, time management, communication and balancing individual and team accountability. Introduction and application to a computer aided graphics package. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG 1012 or GNEG 1103. Corequisite: Lab component.

BENG2612 Biological Engineering Design Studio II (Fa) Applications of biology, chemistry and physics to the design of life support for enclosed biological systems involving people, animals, plants and microbes. Design process will be based upon engineering analyses such as quantifying bio-energetics and growth, energy and mass balances, solar energy and use of watershed modeling tools. Student teams will be presented multiple design modules that include literature/experimental discovery, open-ended design and prototype testing. 4 hours of design studio per week. Prerequisite: GNEG 1121. Pre- or Corequisite: PHYS 2054, BIOL 1543/1541L.

BENG2622 Biological Engineering Design Studio III (Sp) Continuation of BENG 2612. Design Studio experience includes additional life support system design modules. Design process will include discussion of social issues and ethics, use of engineering economics as a tool to evaluate design alternatives. Use of descriptive statistics and regression to analyze experimental data. Improve written and oral communication skills through presentation of design project results. 4 hours of design studio per week. Prerequisite: BENG 2612.

BENG3213 Biomedical Engineering: Emerging Methods and Applications (Sp) Introductory course for undergraduate biomedical engineering students. Emerging biomedical engineering topics including: tissue engineering, stem cell engineering, biomedical nanotechnology, medical imaging and biosensing, single molecule imaging, biomarker discovery and proteomics, gene therapy, drug delivery, and protein engineering. Design of components for tissue engineering processes, nanodrug delivery and nanotechnology based disease detection. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533. Pre- or Corequisite: BENG 3723.

BENG3712 Engineering Properties of Biological Materials (Fa) Measuring and predicting the physical, chemical, and biological properties of biological materials necessary for the analysis and design of production and processing systems. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG 2622.

BENG3723 Unit Operations in Biological Engineering (Sp) Design of basic unit operations typical of biological engineering practice; unit operations include pump-pipe, fan-duct, moist air (psychrometric) processes (cool/heater/humidifier/dryer), air mixing, aeration, and refrigeration; unit operations design will account for unique constraints imposed by biological systems. Lecture 2 hours and lab 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: (MEEG 2403 or CHEG 2313) and (CVEG 3213 or CHEG 2133 or MEEG 3503).

BENG3733 Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems (Fa) Applications of the principles of kinetics and heat and mass transfer to the analysis and design of biological engineering processes. Biological engineering processes will encompass examples in the realms of biotechnology, ecological, and biomedical engineering. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and BENG 3723. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3813.

BENG3803 Mechanical Design in Biological Engineering (Sp) Introduction to the mechanical design process applied to biological engineering, with examples of mechanical components interfacing with biological systems. Engineering properties of materials, loading, combined stress analysis, theories of failure. Systems approach in design, including safety, reliability and cost. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 3013.

BENG4104 Electronic Instrumentation for Biological Systems (Sp) Theory and advanced applications of analog circuits, digital circuits, and commercial instruments involving biological materials and systems. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 2074.

BENG4104H Honors Electronic Instrumentation for Biological Systems (Sp) Theory and advanced applications of analog circuits, digital circuits, and commercial instruments involving biological materials and systems. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 2074 .

BENG4113 Risk Analysis for Biological Systems (Odd years, Fa) Principles of risk assessment including exposure assessment, dose response, and risk management. Methods of risk analysis modeling and simulation with computer software. Applications of risk analysis in medical, animal, food and environmental systems. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 and BIOL 2013.

BENG4123 Biosensors & Bioinstrumentation (Odd years, Sp) Principles of biologically based sensing elements and interfacing techniques. Design and analysis methods of biosensing and transducing components in bioinstrumentation. Applications of biosensors and bioinstrumentation in bioprocessing, bioenvironmental, biomechanical and biomedical engineering. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2013 and BENG 4103.

BENG4133 Digital Remote Sensing and GIS (Irregular) Basic digital image processing techniques and geo-spatial analysis applied to monitoring of natural processes and resources. Course topics include introduction to electromagnetic radiation, concept of color, remote sensing systems, and light attenuation by atmosphere, objects and sensors. Advanced topics include data models, spectral transforms, spatial transforms, correction and calibration, geo-rectification, and image classification with hyperspectral and multi-spectral images acquired with aerial and satellite sensors. Raster GIS is integrated into the course throughout the semester. Will use software such as ENVI, ArcGIS and ArcView. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours per week.

BENG4203 Biomedical Engineering Principles (Fa) Engineering principles applied to the design and analysis of systems affecting human health. This is an introductory course focusing on fundamentals of physiological systems and modeling and how this relates to analysis and equipment design. Topics include: brief overview of anatomy and physiology; bioelectric phenomena, physiological modeling, cardiovascular system, biomechanics, computational biology. Requires a background in circuits, fluid dynamics, mechanics, biology, and chemistry. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MEEG 2013, (MEEG 2403 or CHEG 2313), ELEG 2103, (MEEG 3503 or CVEG 3213 or CHEG 2133), MEEG 3013, BIOL 1543 or equivalents.

BENG4223 Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering (Sp) Application of mathematical techniques and numerical methods for analyzing biological data and solving biological problems. The emphasis will be computer simulation and mathematical modeling applications in biomedical engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

BENG4283 Electronic Response of Biological Tissues (Irregular) Understand the electric and magnetic response of biological tissues with particular reference to neural and cardiovascular systems. Passive and active forms of electric signals in cell communication. We will develop the central electrical mechanisms from the membrane channel to the organ, building on those excitation, dielectric models for tissue behavior, Debye, Cole-Cole models. Role of bound and free water on tissue properties. Magnetic response of tissues. Experimental methods to measure tissue response. Applications to Electrocardiography & Electroencephalography, Microwave Medical Imaging, RF Ablation will be discussed that are common to many electrically active cells in the body. Analysis of Nernst equation, Goldman equation, linear cable theory, and Hodgkin-Huxley Model of action potential generation and propagation. High frequency response of tissues to microwave. Prerequisites: ELEG 3703 or equivalent; MATH 3404 or equivalent; basic biology. (Same as ELEG 4773)

BENG450V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Selected problems in biological engineering are pursued in detail. Prerequisite: senior standing. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

BENG451VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Honors candidacy.

BENG452V Special Topics in Biological Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) Special topics in biological engineering not covered in other courses. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

BENG4703 Biotechnology Engineering (Fa) Introduction to biotechnology topics ranging from principles of microbial growth, mass balances, bioprocess engineering as well as emerging principles in the design of biologically based microbial and enzymatic production systems. Application areas such as biofuels, and fine and bulk chemical production. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG 2622. Corequisite: Lab component.

BENG4813 Senior Biological Engineering Design I (Fa) Design concepts for equipment and processes used in biological, food and agricultural industries. Initiation of comprehensive two-semester team-design projects; defining design objectives, developing functional/mechanical criteria, standards, reliability, safety, ethics and professionalism issues. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Prerequisite: BENG 3723. Pre-or Corequisite: BENG 3733.

BENG4822 Senior Biological Engineering Design II (Sp) Continuation of BENG 4813. Design concepts for equipment and processes used in biological and agricultural industries. Completion of 2-semester team design projects. Construction, testing, and evaluation of prototypes. Written and oral design reports. Discussion of manufacturing methods, safety, ergonomics, analysis/synthesis/design methods as appropriate for particular design projects. Laboratory/design 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG 4813.

BENG4903 Watershed Eco-Hydrology (Sp) Engineering principles involved in assessment and management of surface water flow and hydrologic processes within ecosystems. Includes frequency analysis of rainfall, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration. Use of GIS/mathematical models to quantify hydrologic processes at the watershed-landscape scale. Design/implementation of best management practices and ecological engineering principles and processes for advanced ecological services. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CVEG 3213.

BENG4923 Ecological Engineering Design (Fa) Design of low impact development techniques to enhance ecological services, reduce peak runoff, and capture sediments, nutrients and other pollutants resulting from urban development. Techniques may include: bio-swales, retention basins, and filter strips. Design of sustainable ecological processes for the treatment and utilization of wastes/residues. Techniques may include: direct land application to soils/crops, composting systems, lagoons and constructed wetlands. Design goals include optimization of ecological services to maintain designated uses of land, water and air, including enhancement of habitat for wildlife and recreation, and the discovery of economically viable methods for coexistence of urban and agricultural land uses. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG4903.

BENG500V Advanced Topics in Biological Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) Special problems in fundamental and applied research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

BENG5103 Advanced Instrumentation in Biological Engineering (Even years, Sp) Applications of advanced instrumentation in biological systems. Emphasis on updated sensing and transducing technologies, data acquisition and analytical instruments. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BENG 4103.

BENG5113 DIGITALRemote Sensing and GIS (Irregular) Basic digital image processing techniques and geo-spatial analysis applied to monitoring of natural processes and resources. Course topics include introduction to electromagnetic radiation, concept of color, remote sensing systems, and light attenuation by atmosphere, objects and sensors. Advanced topics include data models, spectral transforms, spatial transforms, correction and calibration, geo-rectification, and image classification with hyperspectral and multi-spectral images acquired with aerial and satellite sensors. Raster GIS is integrated into course throughout the semester. Will use software such as ENVI, ArcGIS and ArcView. Requires a class project in the student's area of interest. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5113 and BENG 4133. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

BENG5203 Mathematical Modeling of Physiological Systems (Sp) Application of mathematical techniques to physiological systems. The emphasis will be on cellular physiology and cardiovascular system. Cellular physiology topics include models of cellular metabolism, membrane dynamics, membrane potential, excitability, wave propagation and cellular function regulation. Cardiovascular system topics include models of blood cells, oxygen transport, cardiac output, cardiac regulation, and circulation. Background in biology and physiology highly recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

BENG5213 Introduction to Bioinformatics (Odd years, Sp) Application of algorithmic techniques to the analysis and solution of biological problems. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology, biological sequence comparison, and phylogenetics, as well as topics of current interest. (Same as CSCE 5213)

BENG5223 Biomedical Engineering Research Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) Minimum six-week program (possibly up to several months) in a medical research environment working on an original engineering research project. Possible specialty areas include Anaesthesiology, Cardiology, Informatics, Opthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, and Radiology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of co-ordinator.

BENG5233 Tissue and Cell Engineering (Fa) This course introduces students to biological, engineering and clinical aspects of tissue and cell engineering. The introduction to stem cells and histology are reinforced with a concomitant lab that introduces cell culture techniques and illustrates functional and structural aspects of various biological tissues. Topics include Cell Signaling, Transport and Kinetics, Scaffolds, Surface Interactions, Drug Delivery, and Clinical, Ethical and Regulatory Considerations. Two to three lecture hours per week plus three lab hours per week. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and CHEM 3813.

BENG5243 Biomaterials (Sp) A graduate course on molecular structure-property relationships in biomaterials. Special focus is given to polymers, metals, ceramics, composites, and biodegradable materials. The design of artificial biomaterials for biosensors, drug delivery and medical implants is considered. Host response and biocompatibility factors are introduced. Previous course in materials desirable.

BENG5253 Bio-Mems (Irregular) Topics include the fundamental principles of microfluidics, Navier-Stokes Equation, bio/abio interfacing technology, bio/abio hybrid integration of microfabrication technology, and various biomedical and biological problems that can be addressed with microfabrication technology and the engineering challenges associated with it. Lecture 3 hour per week. Prerequisites: MEEG 3503 or CVEG 3213 or CHEG 2133. (Same as MEEG 5253)

BENG5263 Biomedical Engineering Principles (Fa) Engineering principles applied to the design and analysis of systems affecting human health. This is a course focusing on fundamentals of physiological systems and modeling. Topics include: brief overview of anatomy and physiology, bioelectric phenomena and neuronal model, compartmental modeling, cardiovascular system and blood flow, biomechanics, computational biology and signal transduction. Requires a background in circuits, fluid dynamics, mechanics, biology, and/or biochemistry. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5263 and BENG 4203. Prerequisites: MATH 3404 or equivalent and graduate standing.

BENG5273 Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering (Sp) Application of mathematical techniques and numerical methods for analyzing biological data and solving biological problems. The emphasis will be computer simulation and mathematical modeling applications in biomedical engineering. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5273 and BENG 4223. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

BENG5283 Electronic Response of Biological Tissues (Irregular) Understand the electric and magnetic response of biological tissues with particular reference to neural and cardiovascular systems. Passive and active forms of electric signals in cell communication. We will develop the central electrical mechanisms from the membrane channel to the organ, building on those that are common to many electrically active cells in the body. Analysis of Nernst equation, Goldman equation, linear cable theory, and Hodgkin-Huxley Model of action potential generation and propagation. High frequency response of tissues to microwave excitation, dielectric models for tissue behavior, Debye, Cole-Cole models. Role of bound and free water on tissue properties. Magnetic response of tissues. Experimental methods to measure tissue response. Applications to Electrocardiography & Electroencephalography, Microwave Medical Imaging, RF Ablation will be discussed. Students may not receive credit for both BENG 4283 and BENG 5283. Prerequisites: MATH 3404, ELEG 3703 or PHYS 3414, BIOL 2533 or equivalent (Same as ELEG 5773)

BENG5613 Simulation Modeling of Biological Systems (Irregular) Application of computer modeling and simulation of discrete-event and continuous-time systems to solve biological and agricultural engineering problems. Philosophy and ethics of representing complex processes in simplified form. Deterministic and stochastic modeling of complex systems, algorithm development, application limits, and simulation interpretation. Emphasis on calibration, validation and testing of biological systems models for the purposes of system optimization, resource allocation, real-time control and/or conceptual understanding. Prerequisite: AGST 4023 or STAT 4003 or INEG 3333.

BENG5703 Design and Analysis of Experiments for Engineering Research (Irregular) Principles of planning and design of experiments for engineering research. Propagation of experimental error. Improving precision of experiments. Analysis of experimental data for optimal design and control of engineering systems using computer techniques. Students must have an introductory background in statistics. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

BENG5723 Food Safety Engineering (Even years, Fa) Principles of engineering methods applied to food and safety and sanitation. Principles of engineering methods applied to food safety and security. Discussion of thermal, chemical and electrical pasteurization or sterilization in food processing. Demonstration of monitoring and detecting techniques for food safety, including image analysis, biosensors and modeling. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BENG 4103 and FDSC 4124 (or equivalent).

BENG5733 Advanced Biotechnology Engineering (Odd years, Fa) Applications of the principles of bioprocess/biochemical engineering to microbiological and biomedical problems. Topics include applied enzymology, metabolic engineering, molecular genetics and control, and bioinformatics and nanobiotechnology in addition to classical applied enzyme and cell-growth kinetics and advanced bioreactor design. Prerequisite: BENG 3733 or CHEG 5531.

BENG5743 Biotechnology Engineering (Fa) Introduction to biotechnology topics ranging from principles of microbial growth, mass balances, bioprocess engineering as well as emerging principles in the design of biologically based microbial and enzymatic production systems. Application areas such as biofuels, and fine and bulk chemical production. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5743 and BENG 4703. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Corequisite: Lab component.

BENG5801 Graduate Seminar (Sp) Reports presented by graduate students on topics dealing with current research in agricultural engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BENG5923 Nonpoint Source Pollution Control and Modeling (Fa) Control of hydrologic, meteorologic, and land use factors on nonpoint source (NPS) pollution in urban and agricultural watersheds. Discussion of water quality models to develop NPS pollution control plans and total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), with consideration of model calibration, validation, and uncertainty analysis. Prerequisite: BENG 4903 or CVEG 3223.

BENG5933 Environmental and Ecological Risk Assessment (Sp) Process and methodologies associated with human-environmental and ecological risk assessments. Environmental risk assessments based on human receptors as endpoints, addressing predominantly abiotic processes. Ecological risk assessments based on non-human receptors as endpoints. Approach using hazard definition, effects assessment, risk estimation, and risk management. Application of methods to student projects to gain experience in defining and quantifying uncertainty associated with human perturbation, management and restoration of environmental and ecological processes.

BENG5943 Watershed Eco-Hydrology (Sp) Engineering principles involved in assessment and management of surface water flow and hydrologic processes within ecosystems. Includes frequency analysis of rainfall, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration. Use of GIS/mathematical models to quantify hydrologic processes at the watershed-landscape scale. Design/implementation of best management practices and ecological engineering principles and processes for advanced ecological services. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5943 and BENG 4903. Prerequisites: CVEG 3213 or equivalent.

BENG5953 Ecological Engineering Design (Fa) Design of low impact development techniques to enhance ecological services, reduce peak runoff, and capture sediments, nutrients and other pollutants resulting from urban development. Techniques may include: bio-swales, retention basins, filter strips. Design of sustainable ecological processes for the treatment and utilization of wastes/residues. Techniques may include: direct land application to soils/crops, composting systems, lagoons and constructed wetlands. Design goals include optimization of ecological services to maintain designated uses of land, water and air; including enhancement of habitat for wildlife and recreation, and the discovery of economically viable methods for co-existence of urban and agricultural land uses. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students may not earn credit for both BENG 5953 and BENG 4923. Prerequisite: BENG 4903 or equivalent.

BENG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BENG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(BIOL) Biology

BIOL1541M Honors Principles of Biology Laboratory (Sp, Fa) This course is designed for the well prepared student in the Honors program. It focuses on teaching students experimental and observational techniques used in the science of biology. It emphasizes the acquisition and interpretation of results that illustrate the major principles of biology. Corequisite: BIOL 1543H or BIOL 1543.

BIOL1541L Principles of Biology Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Experimental and observational techniques used in biology with emphasis on the acquisition and interpretation of results that illustrate major biological principles. Corequisite: BIOL 1543.

BIOL1543 Principles of Biology (Sp, Su, Fa) Principles that unify biology with emphasis on scientific study that demonstrates how all organisms are the product of evolution and are parts of interacting systems from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Corequisite: BIOL 1541L.

BIOL1543H Honors Principles of Biology (Sp, Fa) This course is designed for the well prepared student in Honors program. It focuses on the principles that unify the science of biology. Students will be exposed to how scientific principles have been used to demonstrate that all organisms are the products of evolution and are parts of interacting systems from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Corequisite: BIOL 1541M or BIOL 1541L.

BIOL1601M Honors Principles of Zoology Laboratory (Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 1611M) Laboratory exercises illustrating animal structure, physiology, genetics, and ecology. Corequisite: BIOL 1603.

BIOL1601L Principles of Zoology Laboratory (Su, Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 1611L) Laboratory exercises illustrating animal structure, physiology, genetics, and ecology. Corequisite: BIOL 1603.

BIOL1603 Principles of Zoology (Su, Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 1613) Introduction to zoological principles relating to cells, organ systems, development, genetics, ecology, and animal phyla. Corequisite: BIOL 1601L or BIOL 1601M. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BIOL1611M Honors Plant Biology Laboratory (Sp) (Formerly BOTY 1611M) Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 1613.

BIOL1611L Plant Biology Laboratory (Sp, Su) (Formerly BOTY 1611L) Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 1613.

BIOL1613 Plant Biology (Sp, Su) (Formerly BOTY 1613) Consideration of basic flowering plant structure, growth, development, physiology, genetics, ecology, and a brief survey of other plant groups. Lecture 3 hours per week. BIOL 1611L is recommended as a corequisite and both are required for partial fulfillment of the Fulbright College natural sciences requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BIOL2001 Bibliographic Practicum (Sp, Fa) A systematic survey of biological literature and bibliographic resources. Includes library exercises and the compiling of selected bibliographies.

BIOL2011M Honors General Microbiology Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Techniques for handling microorganisms. Does not count towards BS in Biology. Corequisite: BIOL 2013.

BIOL2011L General Microbiology Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Techniques for handling microorganisms. Does not count toward BS in Biology. Corequisite: BIOL 2013.

BIOL2013 General Microbiology (Sp, Su, Fa) Basic concepts of microbiology including diversity, genetics, metabolism, growth, control of growth, pathogenesis, and immunology. Does not count towards BS in Biology. Corequisite: BIOL 2011L. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and 1 semester of general chemistry.

BIOL2013H Honors General Microbiology (Sp, Su, Fa) Basic concepts of microbiology including diversity, genetics, metabolism, growth, control of growth, pathogenesis, and immunology. Does not count towards BS in Biology. Corequisite: BIOL 2011L or BIOL 2011M. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and 1 semester of general chemistry.

BIOL2211L Human Physiology Laboratory (Sp, Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 2211L) Exercises include experiments on osmosis, reflexes, senses, muscle, cardiovascular system, ventilation, metabolism, renal function, etc. Data collection, analysis, and report writing. Does not satisfy the Fulbright College writing requirement. Corequisite: BIOL 2213.

BIOL2213 Human Physiology (Sp, Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 2213) Fundamental concepts of physiology with emphasis in the human. Corequisite: BIOL 2211L. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1023 and CHEM 1021L) or (CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L) or (CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1101L) or (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) and MATH 1203.

BIOL2321L General Genetics Laboratory (Sp) Analysis of genetic problems and experiments with emphasis on "hands-on" experience with a variety of organisms. May require time outside laboratory period. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 2323.

BIOL2323 General Genetics (Sp) Surveys of Mendelian, molecular, and population mechanisms of inheritance and gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and (MATH 1203 or STAT 2023 or equivalent).

BIOL2404 Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Sp, Fa) Anatomy of selected vertebrate animals with emphasis upon homologous structures in various animal groups. Lecture 2 or 3 hours, laboratory 4 or 6 hours per week. BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L may not be counted for major in Zoology credit if prior credit in BIOL 2404 has been earned. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BIOL2441L Human Anatomy Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Laboratory 3 hours exercises in mammalian anatomy. Cannot be taken without prior credit in BIOL 2443 or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2443. Corequisite: BIOL 2443.

BIOL2443 Human Anatomy (Sp, Su, Fa) Description of human body as a series of organ systems and their interrelationships. Corequisite: BIOL 2441L. Prerequisite: 4 hours of biological sciences.

BIOL2531L Cell Biology Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Introduction to methods and techniques used in Cell Biology research. Laboratory experiences to highlight topics covered in BIOL 2533. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 2533

BIOL2533 Cell Biology (Sp, Fa) Introduction to cell structure, cell processes, biological polymers, energetics, and diversity. An introduction to biochemistry and cell chemistry. Pre- or Corequisite: (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) or (CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L) or equivalent. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BIOL2814 Invertebrate Zoology (Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 2814) Invertebrate phyla of animals with emphasis on structure, classification, and relationships. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BIOL3023 Evolutionary Biology (Fa) An introduction to the mechanisms and patterns of evolutionary change. Seeks to develop logical, scientific skills and to apply them in understanding how life has changed during the history of the earth. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 2323.

BIOL3123 Prokaryote Biology (Sp) An in-depth coverage of prokaryote diversity, genetics, metabolism, growth, structures and functions. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533.

BIOL3123H Honors Prokaryote Biology (Sp) An in-depth coverage of prokaryote diversity, genetics, metabolism, growth, structures and functions. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533.

BIOL3353 Mechanics of Human Movement (Sp, Su, Fa) (Formerly ZOOL 3353) An introduction to basic analysis of motor skills. No credit given toward major in Zoology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L. (Same as KINS 3353)

BIOL3861L General Ecology Laboratory (Fa) Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL3863 General Ecology (Sp, Fa) Ecological principles and concepts; environmental factors and interactions that determine distribution and abundance of organisms. Prerequisite: 7 hours of biological science.

BIOL3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in biological sciences).

BIOL399VH Honors Course (Sp, Fa) (1-4) Prerequisite: junior standing.

BIOL4104 Taxonomy of Flowering Plants (Sp) Identifying, naming, and classifying of wildflowers, weeds, trees, and other flowering plants. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of plant identification. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1613 and BIOL 1611L and BIOL 2323 and BIOL 3023

BIOL4114 Dendrology (Odd years, Fa) Morphology, classification, geographic distribution, and ecology of woody plants. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, and fieldtrips. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL4124 Food Microbiology (Sp) (Formerly MBIO 4124) Microbiology, contamination, preservation, and spoilage of different kinds of foods, food poisoning, sanitation, control, and inspection; microbiology of water; and standard methods for official food and public health laboratories. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L or equivalent. (Same as FDSC 4124)

BIOL4163 Dynamic Models in Biology (Irregular) Mathematical and computational techniques for developing, executing, and analyzing dynamic models arising in the biological sciences. Both discrete and continuous time models are studied. Applications include population dynamics, cellular dynamics, and the spread of infectious diseases. Prerequisite: MATH 2554. (Same as MATH 4163)

BIOL4233 Genomics and Bioinformatics (Sp) Principles of molecular and computational analyses of genomes. Prerequisite: BIOL 4313.

BIOL4233H Honors Genomics and Bioinformatics (Sp) Principles of molecular and computational analyses of genomes. Prerequisite: BIOL 4313.

BIOL4234 Comparative Physiology (Fa) Comparison of fundamental physiological mechanisms in various animal groups. Adaptations to environmental factors at both the organismal and cellular levels are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L

BIOL4263 Cell Physiology (Fa) In-depth molecular coverage of cellular processes involved in growth, metabolism, transport, excitation, signalling and motility, with emphasis on function and regulation in eukaryotes, primarily animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 and CHEM 3813 and PHYS 2033.

BIOL4263H Honors Cell Physiology (Fa) In-depth molecular coverage of cellular processes involved in growth, metabolism, transport, excitation, signalling and motility, with emphasis on function and regulation in eukaryotes, primarily animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 and CHEM 3813 and PHYS 2033.

BIOL4304 Plant Physiology (Fa) Study of plant processes. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1613 and BIOL 1611L and BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and general chemistry.

BIOL4313 Molecular Cell Biology (Sp) In-depth molecular coverage of transcription, cell cycle, translation, and protein processing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 and CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L and CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L.

BIOL4313H Honors Molecular Cell Biology (Sp) In-depth molecular coverage of transcription, cell cycle, translation, and protein processing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 and CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L and CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L.

BIOL4353 Ecological Genetics (Odd years, Fa) Analysis of the genetics of natural and laboratory populations with emphasis on the ecological bases of evolutionary change. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2321L and MATH 2554 and STAT 2023 or equivalent.

BIOL4404 Comparative Botany (Sp) A comparative approach to organisms classically considered to be plants with emphasis on morphology, life history, development, and phylogeny. Three hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2533.

BIOL4404H Honors Comparative Botany (Even years, Fa) A comparative approach to organisms classically considered to be plants with emphasis on morphology, life history, development, and phylogeny. Three hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week.

BIOL4424 Mycology (Fa) Form and function of the fungi. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2533 or Graduate Standing.

BIOL4433 Principles of Evolution (Even years, Fa) Advanced survey of the mechanisms of evolutionary change with special emphasis on advances since the Modern Synthesis. Historical, theoretical, and population genetics approaches are discussed. Recommended BIOL 3023 and BIOL 2321L and BIOL 3861L. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 3863.

BIOL4463 Physiological Ecology (Odd years, Sp) Interactions between environment, physiology, and properties of individuals and populations on both evolutionary and ecological scales. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863 and BIOL 4234 and its lab component.

BIOL4511L Population Ecology Laboratory (Even years, Fa) Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 4513.

BIOL4513 Population Ecology (Even years, Fa) Survey of theoretical and applied aspects of population processes stressing models of growth, interspecific interactions, and adaptation to physical and biotic environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL4523 Plant Ecology (Even years, Sp) To develop understanding of important ecological concepts through study of dynamics relationships among plants and their environment. To become familiar with the literature of plant ecology, and interpretation and critique of ecological research. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL4554 Developmental Biology (Sp) An analysis of the concepts of mechanisms of development emphasizing the experimental approach. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 or graduate standing.

BIOL4613 Primate Adaptation and Evolution (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to the biology of the order Primates. This course considers the comparative anatomy, behavioral ecology and paleontology of our nearest living relatives. Prerequisite: BIOL 3023 or ANTH 1013. (Same as ANTH 4613)

BIOL4693 Forest Ecology (Odd years, Fa) Introduction to the various biological, ecological and historical aspects of forest communities, with particular emphasis on the forests of the central and southeastern United States. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL4703 Mechanisms of Pathogenesis (Fa) A survey of the events causing human disease at the molecular, cellular and genetic levels. Seeks to develop an appreciation that both the tricks pathogens use and the body's own defenses contribute to pathology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533.

BIOL4703H Honors Mechanisms of Pathogenesis (Fa) A survey of the events causing human disease at the molecular, cellular and genetic levels. Seeks to develop an appreciation that both the tricks pathogens use and the body's own defenses contribute to pathology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533.

BIOL4711L Basic Immunology Laboratory (Sp) Corequisite: BIOL 4713.

BIOL4713 Basic Immunology (Sp) (Formerly MBIO 4714) A general overview of immunity with emphasis on the underlying cellular, molecular, and genetic events, and discussions of more specialized issues in immunology, such as disease states involving the immune system, and other interesting problems in modern immunology. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2533.

BIOL4713H Honors Basic Immunology (Sp) A general overview of Immunity with emphasis on the underlying cellular, molecular, and genetic events, and discussions of more specialized issues in Immunology, such as disease states involving the Immune system, and other interesting problems in modern Immunology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2533.

BIOL4724 Protistology (Odd years, Fa) The biology of eukaryotes other than animals, land plants, and fungi with emphasis on morphology and modern approaches to phylogenetic systematics. Three hours lecture, four hours lab/week. Involves writing term papers. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 3023 or graduate standing. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 or graduate standing.

BIOL4734 Wildlife Management Techniques (Odd years, Sp) To familiarize students with techniques used in the management of wildlife populations. Students will be exposed to field methods, approaches to data analysis, experimental design, and how to write a scientific paper. Management applications will be emphasized. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL4744 Fish Biology (Odd years, Sp) Morphology, classification, life history, population dynamics, and natural history of fishes and fish-like vertebrates. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological science.

BIOL4753 General Virology (Sp) An introduction to viral life-cycles, structure, and host cell interactions. Emphasis placed on molecular and biochemical aspects of virology. Two hour lecture and one hour discussion. Prerequisite: BIOL2533 and BIOL2323

BIOL4763 Ornithology (Even years, Sp) Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863

BIOL4774 Biometry (Even years, Sp) Students learn biological statistics and experimental design by actually designing experiments and analyzing data, as well as through lecture, discussion, reading, writing, and problem solving. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours each week. Prerequisite: STAT 2023 or equivalent, BIOL 3863.

BIOL4783 Mammalogy (Even years, Fa) Lectures and laboratory dealing with classification, morphology, distribution, ecology, behavior, and physiology of mammals. Two hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: 10 hours Biological Sciences.

BIOL4793 Introduction to Neurobiology (Sp) Exploration of the neurological underpinnings of perception, action, and experience including: how sense receptors convert information in the world into electricity, how information flows through the nervous systems, how neural wiring makes vision possible, how the nervous system changes with experience, and how the system develops. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533

BIOL480V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) For advanced students with adequate preparation.

BIOL480VH Honors Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) For advanced students with adequate preparation.

BIOL4814 Limnology (Odd years, Fa) Physical, chemical and biological conditions of inland waters. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory by arrangement. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) or equivalent and BIOL 3863 or instructor's permission.

BIOL4833 Animal Behavior (Odd years, Fa) Organization, regulation, and phylogeny of animal behavior, emphasizing vertebrates. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Corequisite: Lab component.

BIOL4844 Community and Ecosystem Ecology (Odd years, Fa) Survey of theoretical and applied aspects of community processes stressing structure, tropic dynamics, community interactions, and major community types. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL485V Field Ecology (Sp, Su) (1-3) Project oriented approach employing current field and laboratory techniques, experimental design, and data analysis. Field trip is required.

BIOL4863 Analysis of Animal Populations (Even years, Sp) Basic principles of design and analysis for population studies of fish and wildlife species. Students will be instructed in the use of the latest software for estimating population parameters. Focus will be on both concepts and applications. Management applications of estimated parameters will be emphasized. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL490V Special Topics in Microbiology (Irregular) (1-6) Consideration of new areas of microbiological knowledge not yet treated adequately in textbooks or in other courses. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biological sciences. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

BIOL4933 Special Topics in Zoology (Su) Discussion of recent outstanding zoological research of interest to zoology majors and public school science teachers. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biological sciences. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

BIOL498V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL499V Problems In Biological Sciences (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Prerequisite: senior standing. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

BIOL499VH Honors Problems in Biological Sciences (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Prerequisite: senior standing. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

BIOL5001 Seminar in Biology (Sp, Fa) Discussion of selected topics and review of current literature in any area of the biological sciences. (Same as CEMB 5911) May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

BIOL5003 Laboratory in Prokaryote Biology (Sp) Laboratory techniques in prokaryote culture, identification, physiology, metabolism, and genetics. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 3123.

BIOL5063 Climate Through Time (Sp) The earth's climate history over the last 2 million years and the influence various factors have had on it; compilation and paleoclimatic histories and methods of dating climatic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 4363 or equivalent. (Same as ENDY 5063,GEOS 5063)

BIOL5233 Genomics and Bioinformatics (Sp) Principles of molecular and computational analyses of genomes. Prerequisite: BIOL4313 or BIOL 5313.

BIOL5263 Cell Physiology (Fa) In-depth molecular coverage of cellular processes involved in growth, metabolism, transport, excitation, signaling and motility, with emphasis on function and regulation in eukaryotes, primarily animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323, BIOL 2533, BIOL 2531L, CHEM 3813, and PHYS 2033.

BIOL529V Research in Physiology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL5313 Molecular Cell Biology (Sp) In-depth molecular coverage of transcription, cell cycle, translation, and protein processing in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323 and CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L and CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L.

BIOL5334 Biochemical Genetics (Sp) Lectures and laboratories based on modern molecular genetic techniques for analyses of eukaryotes and manipulation of prokaryotes. A hands-on course in recombinant DNA techniques: laboratory practices in gene identification, cloning, and characterization. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 3323 (or equivalent) and CHEM 3813 (or equivalent).

BIOL5343 Advanced Immunology (Fa) Aspects of innate, cell-mediated, and humoral immunity in mammalian and avian species. Molecular mechanisms underlying the function of the immune system are emphasized. A course in Basic Immunology prior to enrollment in Advanced Immunology is recommended but not required. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Same as POSC 5343)

BIOL5352L Immunology in the Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory course on immune-diagnostic laboratory techniques and uses of antibodies as a research tool. Included are cell isolation and characterization procedures, immunochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and cell culture assay systems. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: POSC 5343 or BIOL 5343.

BIOL5353 Ecological Genetics (Odd years, Fa) Analysis of the genetics of natural and laboratory populations with emphasis on the ecological bases of evolutional change. Prerequisite: BIOL 3323 and BIOL 3321L and MATH 2554 and STAT 2023 or equivalent.

BIOL539V Research in Genetics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL5404 Comparative Botany (Odd years, Fa) A comparative approach to organisms classically considered to be plants with emphasis on morphology, life history, development, and phylogeny. Three hours lecture, 4 hours lab per week. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

BIOL5423 Human Evolutionary Anatomy (Irregular) Paleobiologists reconstruct past lifeways and systematic relationships of our ancestors using comparative studies of bony morphology and associated soft tissues. This course surveys methods and theories used to infer function and phylogeny, and details relevant aspects of the anatomy of humans, living great apes, and fossil human ancestors. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and BIOL 1543. (Same as ANTH 5423)

BIOL5433 Principles of Evolution (Even years, Fa) Advanced survey of the mechanisms of evolutionary change with special emphasis on advances since the Modern Synthesis. Historical, theoretical, and population genetics approaches are discussed. Recommended: BIOL 3023 and BIOL 3321L and BIOL 3861L. Prerequisite: BIOL 3323 and BIOL 3863.

BIOL5463 Physiological Ecology (Odd years, Sp) Interactions between environment, physiology, and properties of individuals and populations on both evolutionary and ecological scales. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863 and BIOL 4234.

BIOL5511L Population Ecology Laboratory (Even Years, Fa) Demonstration of the models and concepts from BIOL 5513. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 5513.

BIOL5513 Population Ecology (Even years, Fa) Survey of theoretical and applied aspects of populations processes stressing models of growth, interspecific interactions, and adaptation to physical and biotic environments. Corequisite: BIOL 5511L. Prerequisite: BIOL 3864.

BIOL5523 Plant Ecology (Even years, Sp) To develop understanding of important ecological concepts through study of dynamics relationships among plants and their environment. To become familiar with the literature of plant ecology, and interpretation and critique of ecological research. Prerequisite: BIOL 3864.

BIOL5524 Developmental Biology (Sp) An analysis of the concepts and mechanisms of development emphasizing the experimental approach. Corequisite: Lab component.

BIOL5533 Chemical and Biochemical Aspects of Evolution (Odd years, Sp) Abiotic synthesis of biomolecules on Earth, the origin of cells; genetic information, origin of life on Earth and elsewhere, evolution and diversity, ecological niches, bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, novel metabolic reshaping of the environment, life being reshaped by the environment, molecular data and evolution.

BIOL5553 Astrobiology (Irregular) Discusses the scientific basis for the possible existence of extraterrestrial life. Includes the origin and evolution of life on Earth, possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system (including Mars), and the possibility of life on planets around other stars. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (Same as SPAC 5553)

BIOL558V Research In Cell Biology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

BIOL5703 Mechanisms of Pathogenesis (Fa) A survey of events causing human disease at the molecular, cellular and genetic levels. Seeks to develop an appreciation that both the tricks pathogens use and the body's own defenses contribute to pathology.

BIOL5713 Basic Immunology (Sp) A general overview of Immunity with emphasis on the underlying cellular, molecular and genetic events controlling immune reactions. Reading of the primary literature on disease states involving the immune system.

BIOL5723 Fish Biology (Odd years, Sp) Morphology, classification, life histories, population dynamics, and natural history of fishes and fish-like vertebrates. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological sciences.

BIOL5743 Herpetology (Even years, Sp) Morphology, classification and ecology of amphibians and reptiles. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

BIOL5753 General Virology (Sp) An introduction to viral life-cycles, structure, and host cell interactions. Emphasis placed on molecular and biochemical aspects of virology. Two hour lecture and one hour discussion. Prerequisite: BIOL 2533 and BIOL 2323.

BIOL5763 Ornithology (Even years, Sp) Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: 10 hours of biological sciences.

BIOL5783 Mammalogy (Fa) Lectures and laboratory dealing with classification, morphology, distribution, ecology, behavior, and physiology of mammals. Two hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory. Corequisite: Lab component.

BIOL579V Research in Vertebrate Zoology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL580V Research in Botany (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

BIOL5814 Limnology (Odd years, Fa) Physical, chemical and biological conditions of inland waters. Lecture 3 hours per week, laboratory arranged. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) or equivalent and 12 hours of biological sciences.

BIOL581V Research In Microbiology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL5833 Animal Behavior (Odd years, Fa) Organization, regulation, and phylogeny of animal behavior, emphasizing vertebrates. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Corequisite: Lab component.

BIOL5843 Conservation Biology (Fa) The study of direct and indirect factors by which biodiversity is impacted by human activity. It is a synthetic field of study that incorporates principles of ecology, biogeography, population genetics, economics, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, geology, and geography. Prerequisite: BIOL 3863.

BIOL5844 Community Ecology (Odd years, Fa) Survey of theoretical and applied aspects of community processes stressing structure, trophic dynamics, community interactions, and major community types. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 3864.

BIOL585V Field Ecology (Sp, Su) (1-3) Project-oriented approach employing current field and laboratory techniques, experimental design and data analysis. Field trip is required.

BIOL589V Research in Field Zoology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

BIOL590V Special Topics in Botany (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Consideration of new areas of botanical science not yet treated adequately in textbooks or in other courses. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biological sciences. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

BIOL5914 Stream Ecology (Even years, Fa) Current concepts and research in lotic ecosystem dynamics. Lecture, laboratory, field work and individual research projects required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Some previous course work in ecology is essential.

BIOL591V Special Topics in Microbiology (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Consideration of new areas of microbiological science not yet treated adequately in textbooks or in other sciences. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biological sciences.

BIOL5933 Global Biogeochemistry: Elemental Cycles and Environmental Change (Odd Years, Sp) This course explores the chemical, biological, and geological processes occurring within ecosystems. An understanding of these processes is used to investigate how they form the global biogeochemical cycles that provide energy and nutrients necessary for life. Class discussions focus on global change and the effects of more recent anthropogenic influences. Prerequisite: College level chemistry or biochemistry and ecology.

BIOL600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BIOL700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

(BLAW) Business Law

BLAW3033 Commercial Law (Sp) A study of the laws applicable to commercial transactions. Topics covered include the common law of contracts, Articles Two (Sales) and Three (Commercial Paper) of the Uniform Commercial Code, secured transactions, suretyship, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: WCOB 1012.

(CATE) Career and Technical Education

CATE1001 Practicum in Career & Technical Education (Sp, Fa) This practicum is a requirement for entry into the Career & Technical teacher preparation program. Students will be involved in documented experiences with children for a minimum of 60 hours with at least 20 of them being in career & technical education classrooms at three schools with diverse populations. (Same as CIED 1011,PHED 1003)

CATE380V Supervised Work Experience (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-9) Supervision in business and industry under guidance. Designed for students who desire or need directed occupational experience. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CATE390V Competency Based Teacher Development: Program Organization (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-12) Development of competencies related to the methodology of instructional planning, execution, and evaluation. Provided by PBTE modules and University resource person. Enrollment before CATE 391V and 392V. Prerequisite: Employed in service vocational-technical education field based instructor. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CATE391V Competency Based Teacher Development - Teaching Adults (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-12) Development of competencies related to vocational guidance, contemporary instructional techniques, and student vocational organizations. Provided by PBTE modules and University resource person. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of CATE 390V and employee inservice-vocational-technical education field based instructor. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

CATE392V Competency Based Teacher Development: Teaching & Learning (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-12) Development of competencies related to program planning, development, evaluation; school community relations; and professional development. Provided by CBTD modules and University resource person. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of CATE 391V and employee inservice-vocational-technical education field based instructor. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CATE393V Competency Based Internship: Educational Legal Issues (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) In an actual school setting the student will satisfactorily demonstrate the competencies required to conduct a total vocational-technical education program. Instruction and follow-up will be provided by a University resource person. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of CATE 392V and employee inservice-vocational-technical education field based instructor. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

CATE4003 Introduction to Professionalism (Fa) Studying and developing educational concepts in career and technical education with accepted principles of professionalism in secondary education settings.

CATE4003H Honors Introduction to Professionalism (Fa) Studying and developing professional concepts in vocational education with accepted principles of professionalism applied to career and technical education settings.

CATE4013 Teaching Strategies (Fa) Methods and techniques in the preparation and delivery of teaching.

CATE4023 Classroom Management (Fa) Theory and techniques in classroom management, including professional ethics and school policies related to students, faculty and programs.

CATE4033 Assessment / Program Evaluation (Fa) An introduction to constructing, evaluating and interpreting tests; descriptive and inferential statistics; state competency testing; and guidelines for state program valuations.

CATE4041 Lab Management in Career & Technical Education (Sp) Selection, design and evaluation of laboratory experiences in business education, family and consumer sciences and technology education. Co-requisite: CATE 406V.

CATE4051 Seminar Teaching Internship (Sp) Site-based field experiences are integrated with the course content to provide continuity between theory and practice. Classroom management, ethics and diversity are emphasized. Corequisite: VOED 406V.

CATE406V Teaching Internship (Sp) A minimum of 15 weeks will be spent in an off-campus school, at which time the student will have an opportunity under supervision to observe, to teach and to participate in other activities involving the school and the community. Prerequisite: Senior status, CATE 4003, CATE 4013, CATE 4023, CATE 4033, CIED 3023 and CIED 3033.

CATE4101 Understanding Student Affairs (Fa) This course provides students an opportunity to gain knowledge in the theory and practical application of student affairs. An emphasis is placed on leadership development, problem solving, and career exploration in student affairs.

CATE4122 Leadership Development (Sp) Studying and developing leadership in career and technical education using commonly accepted principles of leadership applied to workforce education settings.

CATE4803 Problems in Career & Technical Education (Sp, Su, Fa) Problems and issues relating to instruction in career and technical education. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

CATE481V Career Planning and Professional Development for Juniors and Seniors (Sp, Fa) (1-3) A consideration of special problems relating to technical education and career planning. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CATE5004 Cohort Directed Field Experience (Sp, Su, Fa) A minimum of 8 weeks will be spent in an off-campus school, at which time the student will have an opportunity to observe 6 classroom teachers and to teach under supervision. Prerequisite: Cohort year status.

CATE5013 Teaching Strategies (Fa) This course is designed to offer a variety of ideas and experiences concerning methods of teaching, planning and presenting instruction.

CATE5016 Cohort Teaching Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) A minimum of 10 weeks will be spent in an off-campus school, at which time the intern will have an opportunity under supervision to observe, to teach, and to participate in other activities involving the school and the community. Prerequisite: Cohort year status.

CATE5033 Assessment/Program Evaluation (Fa) An introduction to constructing, evaluating, and interpreting tests; descriptive and inferential statistics; state competency testing; and guidelines for state program evaluations. Prerequisite: Graduate Status

CATE5103 Teaching Strategies in Career & Technical Education Methods and techniques in teaching business education, family and consumer sciences, and technology education.

CATE5113 Laboratory Management in Career & Technical Education Selection, design, and evaluation of laboratory experiences in career and technical education.

CATE5123 Current Design and Evaluation in Career & Technical Education (Sp, Su, Fa) Methods and techniques in developing, organizing, implementing, and evaluating programs in career & technical education.

CATE5191 Applied Research (Sp, Su, Fa) Interpretation and evaluation of research in education for classroom utilization.

CATE5453 Career Orientation Programs (Su) Provides a survey of types and sources of occupational information and methods of providing occupational-oriented experiences. Designed for teachers and future teachers of career orientation and is 1 of 2 required courses for vocational career orientation.

CATE5463 Applications in Career Orientation (Su) Student is introduced to various teaching methods and techniques of managing hands-on activities in career orientation class setting.

CATE5503 Trends and Issues in Technology Education (Sp, Su, Fa) A comprehensive technology education methods course pertaining to the teaching of standards-based curriculum materials.

CATE5543 Technology for Teaching and Learning (Su, Fa) A study of computer technology as it relates to teacher education. This course concentrates on knowledge and performance and includes hands-on technology activities that can be incorporated in an educational setting. Students interact with the instructor and other students via BlackBoard and engage in weekly discussions and acquire hands-on computer technology experience.

CATE5573 Instructional Materials (Sp, Su) A comprehensive course designed to give students the opportunity to understand, prepare, and test materials leading toward excellence in instruction.

(CDIS) Communication Disorders

CDIS2253 Introduction to Communicative Disorders (Sp, Fa) An introductory course which surveys the professional interests of speech-language pathology and audiology with specific attention to the general recognition and classification of disorders of speech, language, and hearing, and general trends in rehabilitation. Consideration given to the classroom teacher's involvement in communication disorders.

CDIS3103 Introduction to Audiology (Fa) introduction to the basic concepts for administering and interpreting hearing tests, including the anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, disorders of the ear, and techniques for administering and interpreting basic pure tone threshold tests.

CDIS3124 Normal Phonology and Articulatory Process (Fa) Analysis of the English speech sounds as a basis for speech improvement; physiological positions and movements; acoustic qualities and transcription in the international phonetic alphabet. Corequisite: Lab component.

CDIS3203 Articulation Disorders (Sp) A study of the definition, etiology, pathology, and treatment procedures of problems of articulation. Prerequisite: CDIS 3124 and CDIS 3213.

CDIS3213 Anatomy of Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms (Fa) Structure and function of the organic mechanisms responsible for speech, language, and audition.

CDIS3224 Language Development in Children (Fa) Study of the nature of language behavior and of the typical development of speech and language functions for communicative purposes, with primary emphasis on the preschool and early school-age child. Corequisite: Lab component.

CDIS3224H Honors Language Development in Children (Fa) Study of the nature of language behavior and of the typical development of speech and language functions for communicative purposes, with primary emphasis on the preschool and early school-age child. Corequisite: Lab component.

CDIS3233 Introduction to Clinical Practice (Sp, Fa) An introduction to the various aspects of clinical operations including technical and interpersonal relationship skills necessary for case management and a survey of professional standards.

CDIS3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in speech or dramatic art).

CDIS399VH Honors Course (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CDIS4001 Clinical Practicum Undergrad (Sp, Fa) Entry-level training in speech-language clinical practicum activities. This course is taken for satisfactory or unsatisfactory credit. Prerequisite: CDIS 2224 and CDIS 3203 and CDIS 3223 and CDIS 3234 plus satisfactory completion of specific program requirements for admission to clinical practice.

CDIS4103 Sign Language and Deafness (Sp, Su) An introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) and the Deaf Community that uses it. This class will study expressive and sign language skills using ASL vocabulary, structure and grammar. The Deaf Community will be studies through videotapes and readings. Issues in Deaf Education will also be introduced.

CDIS4133 Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation (Sp) Study of the technique used in the rehabilitation of speech and language problems of the hearing impaired including the role of amplification, auditory training, and speech reading in rehabilitation. Prerequisite: CDIS 3103.

CDIS4183 Clinical Assessment of Speech and Language Disorders (Fa) Study of the basic diagnostic procedures used in speech-language pathology. Emphasis is placed on the clinical processes of assessment, including criteria for test selection, techniques in test administration, and interpretation of test results. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in CDIS.

CDIS4213 Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science (Sp) Study of the acoustic structure of oral speech and the auditory skills underlying speech perception. Prerequisite: CDIS 3203, CDIS 3213, CDIS 3124 and its lab component.

CDIS4223 Language Disorders in Children (Sp) Study of disorders of language acquisition and usage in children and adolescents, with emphasis upon the nature, assessment, and treatment of such disorders. Prerequisite: CDIS 3223.

CDIS4253 Neurological Bases of Communication (Fa) A study of the structures and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems as they relate to human speech, language, and cognition. Prerequisite: CDIS 3213.

CDIS4263 Advanced Audiology (Fa) Study of the basic techniques used in audiological assessment of children and adults, including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and special tests of hearing function. Prerequisite: CDIS 3103.

CDIS4273 Communication Behavior and Aging (Fa) Study of the effects upon communication of normal aspects of the aging process, from early adulthood throughout the lifespan. Changes in speech, language, and hearing functioning are identified; common alterations in communicative disorders commonly associated with advanced age are discussed.

CDIS490V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Prerequisite: Advanced standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CDIS5102 Research Methodology in Communication Disorders (Su) An examination of methods of research in speech-language pathology and audiology and of the use of bibliographic tools. Focuses on purposes and problems of various forms of communication disorders research, procedures and instruments employed, and reporting of research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5112 Seminar in Early Intervention (Fa) Study of a family-centered, transdisciplinary approach to early intervention with infants and toddlers at-risk for communication disorders. Topics include early communication development, service delivery in a family context, coordination with other disciplines, and legislation mandating services. Prerequisite: CDIS 3223 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

CDIS5121 Feeding and Swallowing Disorders Lab (Fa) Observation and interpretation of techniques used for assessment and remediation of feeding and swallowing disorders in children and adults. Corequisite: CDIS 5122. Prerequisite: CDIS 3213 and graduate standing.

CDIS5122 Feeding and Swallowing Disorders (Fa) Study of the etiology, assessment, and remediation of feeding and swallowing disorders in children and adults. Prerequisite: CDIS 3213 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

CDIS5133 Discourse Analysis and Treatment (Fa) Study of discourse behaviors and discourse analysis procedures appropriate for communicatively disordered children and adults, along with review of management approaches associated with impaired discourse performance. Prerequisite: Previous course work in language process and disorders, and graduate standing.

CDIS5143 Cognitive-Communication Development and Disorders (Fa) Study of normal cognitive development, the role of communication in this development, and shifts that may occur in conjunction with various speech, language and/or hearing disorders. Prerequisite: CDIS 3223.

CDIS5163 Seminar in Language Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of selected topics in normal and disordered language acquisition and/or language use. Implications of current research are reviewed and applied to evaluation and management of language impairment(s). Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5193 Seminar in Problems of Oral Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Investigation of research in selected problems of oral communication; recent developments in speech-language pathology and audiology; individual problems for investigation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5214 Voice and Resonance Disorders (Su) Study of disorders of phonation and resonation, including etiologies, diagnosis, and intervention strategies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5222 Fluency Disorders (Fa) Speech disfluency, including theoretical etiological assumptions and management consideration. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5232 Seminar in Misarticulation (Sp) Etiology, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of speech articulation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5244 Language Disorders in Adults (Sp) Cognitive and communicative breakdown due to neurological trauma, including etiology, characteristics, assessment and treatment for aphasia, traumatic brain injury, and right hemisphere disorders. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5253 Motor Speech Disorders (Sp) Study of motor speech production disorders related to damage to central or peripheral nervous system motor centers and pathways. Cerebral palsy, adult dysarthria, apraxia, and dysphagia are emphasized. Both theoretical and treatment considerations are addressed. Prerequisite: CDIS 4253 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

CDIS5262 Seminar in Hearing Disorders (Su) Study of selected topics related to hearing assessment and disorders. Topics selected to be relevant to practice of speech-language pathology and other disciplines. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5273 Language, Learning and Literacy (Su) An examination of language-based literacy skills, including consideration of development, disorders, assessment and intervention.

CDIS528V ADV CP: Speech-Language (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

CDIS5293 Augmentative and Alternative Communication (Fa) Approaches to communication management with the severely and profoundly handicapped child or adult, with primary emphasis on augmentative and alternative communication assessment and intervention. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5381 Diagnostic Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) Practicum activities in speech-language assessment. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS5391 Clinical Practicum: Hearing Disorders (Sp, Su, Fa) Practicum in audiology.

CDIS548V Off-Campus Practicum: Public School Site (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Practicum activities in speech-language disorders in a public school setting. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS558V Internship: Clinical Site (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) Field placement in approved clinical setting for clock hours in speech-language pathology assessment and treatment. Students in the master's program must enroll in a minimum of 3 credit hours of CDIS 558V or CDIS 578V during their last semester of graduate studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; completion of other required practicum courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CDIS568V Off-Campus Practicum: Clinical Site (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Practicum activities in speech-language disorders in an off-campus clinical site. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; completion of at least 2 semesters of CDIS 528V.

CDIS578V Internship: Public School Site (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) Field placement in approved public school setting for clock hours in speech-language pathology assessment and treatment. Students in the Master's program must enroll in a minimum of 3 credit hours of CDIS 578V or CDIS 558V during their last semester of graduate studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; completion of other required practicum courses.

CDIS590V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CDIS599V Seminar in Professional Issues (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Selected topics in professional issues in speech-language pathology and audiology.

CDIS600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CDIS699V Seminar in Communication Sciences and Disorders (Irregular) (1-6) Discussion of pertinent topics and issues in the discipline of communication sciences and disorders. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

(CEMB) Cell & Molecular Biology

CEMB590V Special Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Consideration of new areas in Cell and Molecular Biology not yet treated adequately in textbooks or in other courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CEMB5911 Seminar in Cell and Molecular Biology (Sp, Fa) Discussion of current topics in Cell and Molecular Biology. All graduate students in the Cell and Molecular Biology degree program must enroll every fall and spring semester in this course or an approved alternate seminar course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as BIOL 5001) May be repeated for up to 1 hours of degree credit.

CEMB600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CEMB700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(CHEG) Chemical Engineering

CHEG1113 Introduction to Chemical Engineering (Fa) Introduction to the field of chemical engineering. Industries, careers, and the curriculum are discussed. Basic chemical engineering terms, concepts, and calculations are presented. Mass balance calculations are performed and the application of computers to chemical engineering problems is introduced. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103.

CHEG1123 Introduction to Chemical Engineering II (Sp) Multiple-reaction, multi-unit mass balances; vapor-liquid equilibrium, enthalpy balances; rate concepts; thermodynamics and equilibrium stage concepts; engineering economics; professionalism; ethics; computer applications; and introduction to process simulation. Prerequisite: CHEG 1113 and CHEM 1123.

CHEG1212L Chemical Engineering Laboratory I (Sp, Fa) Experimental measurements of various physical properties and comparison with published values and theoretical predictions. Interpretation of results using graphical, numerical and statistical tools, and presentation of results in written technical reports and oral briefings. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre or Corequisite: CHEG 1113. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103

CHEG2133 Fluid Mechanics (Sp, Su, Fa) Analysis and design of fluids handling equipment and systems. Application of the principles of fluid statics, fluid dynamics, compressible flow, etc. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEG 1123 or junior standing.

CHEG2221 Professional Practice Seminar (Fa) Discussion and experimental exercises in interpersonal relations, communication skills (including formal oral and written reports), group dynamics, leadership, professionalism, and ethics. Prerequisite: CHEG 1212L.

CHEG2313 Thermodynamics of Single-Component Systems (Sp, Su, Fa) A detailed study of the thermodynamic "state principles," energy and entropy balances, and their application to the solution of problems involving single-component physical systems and processes. Pre or Corequisite: MATH 2574. Prerequisite: CHEG 1123 or junior standing.

CHEG3143 Heat Transport (Sp, Fa) Application of the principles of conduction, convection and radiation to the analysis and design of chemical processing heat transfer equipment and systems such as double-pipe and shell-and tube heat exchangers, multiple-effect evaporators, condensers, and boilers. Prerequisite: CHEG 2133 and CHEG 2313.

CHEG3143H Honors Heat Transport (Sp, Fa) Application of the principles of conduction, convection and radiation to the analysis and design of chemical processing heat transfer equipment and systems such as double-pipe and shell-and tube heat exchangers, multiple-effect evaporators, condensers, and boilers. Prerequisite: CHEG 2133 and CHEG 2313.

CHEG3153 Non-Equil. Mass Transfer (Sp, Su) Fundamentals of chemical diffusional processes. Applications in chemical engineering design of stagewise and continuous separations. Prerequisite: CHEG 2133 and CHEG 3323.

CHEG3153H Honors Non-Equil. Mass Transfer (Sp, Su) Fundamentals of chemical diffusional processes. Applications in chemical engineering design of stagewise and continuous separations. Prerequisite: CHEG 2133 and CHEG 3323.

CHEG3232L Chemical Engineering Laboratory II (Sp, Fa) Experimental investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer. Complete written reports are required. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEG 3143. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEG 1212L and CHEG 2221.

CHEG3253 Chemical Engineering Computer Methods (Fa) Application of computer methods to chemical engineering problems including a review of structured programming principles. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre or Corequisite: CHEG 3143. Prerequisite: MATH 3404. .

CHEG3323 Thermodynamics of Multi-Component Systems (Sp, Fa) The use of the state principle and energy and entropy balance developed in CHEG 2313 is extended to allow processes. Physical and chemical equilibrium processes are considered in detail. Prerequisite: CHEG 2313 and MATH 2574.

CHEG3323H Honors Thermodynamics of Multi-Component Systems (Sp, Fa) The use of the state principle and energy and entropy balance developed in CHEG 2313 is extended to allow processes. Physical and chemical equilibrium processes are considered in detail. Prerequisite: CHEG 2313 and MATH 2574.

CHEG3333 Chemical Engineering Reactor Design (Sp, Su) Principles of kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions, catalysis, and reactor design with applications, drawn from industrial processes. Prerequisite: CHEG 1123 and MATH 3404.

CHEG3333H Honors Chemical Engineering Reactor Design (Sp, Su) Principles of kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions, catalysis, and reactor design with applications, drawn from industrial processes. Prerequisite: CHEG 1123 and MATH 3404.

CHEG4163 Equil Stage Mass Transfer (Fa) Applications of chemical engineering design to stagewise and continuous separations in systems approaching equilibrium. Prerequisite: CHEG 3323.

CHEG4163H Honors Equil. Stage Mass Transfer (Fa) Applications of chemical engineering design to stagewise and continuous separations in systems approaching equilibrium. Prerequisite: CHEG 3323.

CHEG4273 Corrosion Control (Sp) Qualitative and quantitative introduction to corrosion and its control. Application of the fundamentals of corrosion control in the process industries is emphasized. Prerequisite: CHEG 2313.

CHEG4332L Chemical Engineering Laboratory III (Sp, Su, Fa) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer. Special attention to attaining a high order of accuracy and to presenting results in complete written reports, with emphasis on quality rather than quantity work performed. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEG 3153 and CHEG 4163. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEG 3232L.

CHEG4413 Chemical Engineering Design I (Sp, Fa) Principles of cost estimation, profitability, economic analysis, and economic balances as practiced in the chemical process industries. Special emphasis on the solution of problems involving the combination of engineering principles and economics. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEG 4163 and CHEG 3153. Prerequisite: ECON 2013 (or ECON 2143) and CHEG 3143 and CHEG 3333.

CHEG4413H Honors Chemical Engineering Design I (Sp, Fa) Principles of cost estimation, profitability, economic analysis, and economic balances as practiced in the chemical process industries. Special emphasis on the solution of problems involving the combination of engineering principles and economics. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEG 4163 and CHEG 3153. Prerequisite: ECON 2013 (or ECON 2143) and CHEG 3143 and CHEG 3333.

CHEG4423 Automatic Process Control (Sp) Application of mathematical modeling methods to the description of transient phenomena of interest to process engineers. Modes of control and principles of feedback control are introduced with applications to process engineering problems. Prerequisite: CHEG 3143 and CHEG 3253.

CHEG4423H Honors Automatic Process Control (Sp) Application of mathematical modeling methods to the description of transient phenomena of interest to process engineers. Modes of control and principles of feedback control are introduced with applications to process engineering problems. Prerequisite: CHEG 3143 and CHEG 3253.

CHEG4443 Chemical Engineering Design II (Sp, Fa) Responsibility for decision making is placed on the students in the solution of a comprehensive, open ended problem based on an industrial process. Both formal oral and formal written presentation of results are required. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEG 4413 and CHEG 4163.

CHEG4443H Honors Chemical Engineering Design II (Sp, Fa) Responsibility for decision making is placed on the students in the solution of a comprehensive, open ended problem based on an industrial process. Both formal oral and formal written presentation of results are required. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEG 4413 and CHEG 4163.

CHEG4813 Chemical Process Safety (Fa) Application of chemical engineering principles to the study of safety, health, and loss prevention. Fires and explosions, hygiene, toxicology, hazard identification, and risk assessment in the chemical process industries. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CHEG4813H Honors Chemical Process Safety (Fa) Application of chemical engineering principles to the study of safety, health, and loss prevention. Fires and explosions, hygiene, toxicology, hazard identification, and risk assessment in the chemical process industries. Prerequisite: senior standing.

CHEG488V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CHEG5013 Membrane Separation and System Design (Fa) Theory and system design of cross flow membrane process--reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, and microfiltration--and applications for pollution control, water treatment, food and pharmaceutical processing. Prerequisite: CHEG 3153.

CHEG5033 Technical Administration (Irregular) Contemporary issues affecting the domestic and global Chemical Process Industries (CPI). Emphasis is on process economics, market and corporate strategy as well as advances in technology to improve corporate earnings while addressing the threats and opportunities in the CPI. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing.

CHEG5113 Transport Processes I (Sp) Fundamental concepts and laws governing the transfer of momentum, mass, and heat. Prerequisite: CHEG 2313 (or equivalent) and MATH 3404.

CHEG5133 Advanced Reactor Design (Fa) Applied reaction kinetics with emphasis on the design of heterogeneous reacting systems including solid surface catalysis, enzyme catalysis, and transport phenomena effects. Various types of industrial reactors, such as packed bed, fluidized beds, and other non-ideal flow systems are considered. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and CHEG 3333.

CHEG5213 Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations (Sp) Developments of and solutions of equations and mathematical models of chemical processes and mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEG 3333 and CHEG 3253.

CHEG5273 Corrosion Control (Sp) Qualitative and quantitative introduction to corrosion and its control. Application of the fundamentals of corrosion control in the process industries is emphasized. Prerequisite: CHEG 2313.

CHEG5313 Planetary Atmospheres (IR) Origins of planetary atmospheres, structures of atmospheres, climate evolution, dynamics of atmospheres, levels in the atmosphere, the upper atmosphere, escape of atmospheres, and comparative planetology of atmospheres. (Same as SPAC 5313)

CHEG5333 Advanced Thermodynamics (Fa) Methods of statistical thermodynamics, the correlation of classical and statistical thermodynamics, and the theory of thermodynamics of continuous systems (non-equilibrium thermodynamics). Prerequisite: CHEG 3323.

CHEG5353 Advanced Separations (Sp) Phase equilibrium in non-ideal and multicomponent systems, digital and other methods of computation are included to cover the fundamentals of distillation, absorption, and extraction. Prerequisite: CHEG 4163.

CHEG5513 Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals (Sp) An introduction to bioprocessing with an emphasis on modern biochemical engineering techniques and biotechnology. Topics include: basic metabolism (procaryote and eucaryote), biochemical pathways, enzyme kinetics (including immobilized processes), separation processes (e.g. chromatography) and recombinant DNA methods. Material is covered within the context of mathematical descriptions (calculus, linear algebra) of biochemical phenomenon. Prerequisite: CHEG 3143.

CHEG5733 Polymer Theory and Practice (Fa) Theories and methods for converting monomers into polymers are presented. Topics include principles of polymer science, commercial processes, rheology, and fabrication. Prerequisite: CHEM 3603 or CHEM 3613.

CHEG5801 Graduate Seminar (Sp, Fa) Oral presentations are given by master's candidates on a variety of chemical engineering subjects with special emphasis on new developments. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEG588V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Opportunity for individual study of an advanced chemical engineering problem not sufficiently comprehensive to be a thesis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CHEG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEG6123 Transport Processes II (Fa) Continuation of CHEG 5113.

CHEG6203 Preparation of Research Proposals (Sp) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CHEG6801 Graduate Seminar (Sp, Fa) Oral presentations are given by doctoral students on a variety of chemical engineering subjects with special emphasis on new developments. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

CHEG688V Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Advanced study of current Chemical Engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Doctoral students only. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CHEG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(CHEM) Chemistry

CHEM1051L Chemistry in the Modern World Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory exercises appropriate to Chemistry in the Modern World. Meets 2 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1053.

CHEM1053 Chemistry in the Modern World (Sp) The impact of chemical developments upon contemporary society. Chemical problems of ecological, environmental, nutritional, economic, and sociological concern. Designed for non-science majors. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1051L.

CHEM1071L Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory (Su, Fa) Laboratory exercises in principles and practices of Fundamental Chemistry. Meets 2 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1074.

CHEM1074 Fundamentals of Chemistry (Su, Fa) Fundamental principles of chemistry for students majoring in Home Economics or Nursing. Lecture 4 hours, recitation 1 hour per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1071L and related course component drill section for CHEM 1074.

CHEM1101L University of Chemistry I Laboratory (Su, Fa) Laboratory exercises illustrating qualitative concepts and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Meets 3 hours per week for 1 hour credit.

CHEM1103 University Chemistry I (Su, Fa) Survey of basic chemical principles designed as an introductory course for science, engineering or agriculture majors. CHEM 1101L is a recommended laboratory for students who do not have credit for chemistry laboratory work at the high school level. Corequisite: drill component. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1203 or higher (or satisfactory performance on the mathematics proficiency exam).

CHEM1121M Honors University Chemistry II Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Quantitative laboratory with data interpretation and exercises covering the topics of stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Designed for students in the honors programs. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 1123H.

CHEM1121L University Chemistry II Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Quantitative laboratory with data interpretation and exercises covering the topics of stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory 3 hours per week for 1 credit hour. Upon successful completion of 1121 with a grade of "C" or better, credit for 1101L can be requested by the student. Corequisite: CHEM 1123 and related course component drill section for CHEM 1123.

CHEM1123 University Chemistry II (Sp, Su, Fa) Presents the topics of periodicity, bonding, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and chemical equilibrium in detail. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students who pass the CHEM 1103 Freshman Chemistry Proficiency Exam and enroll in CHEM 1123/1121L and receive a grade of C or better in these courses will also receive credit for CHEM 1103/1101L. Corequisite: CHEM 1121L and related course component drill section for CHEM 1123. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 (or CHEM 1213 or satisfactory performance on the chemistry proficiency examination) and MATH 1203 or higher or satisfactory performance on the mathematics proficiency examination.

CHEM1123H Honors University Chemistry II (Sp, Fa) Presents the topics of periodicity, bonding, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and chemical equilibrium in detail. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students who pass the CHEM 1103 Freshman Chemistry Proficiency Exam and enroll in CHEM 1123H/1121M and receive a grade of C or better in these courses will also receive credit for CHEM 1103/1101L. Corequisite: CHEM 1121M and related course component drill section for CHEM 1123H. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 (or CHEM 1213 or satisfactory performance on the chemistry proficiency examination) and MATH 1203 or higher or satisfactory performance on the mathematics proficiency examination.

CHEM1211L Chemistry for Majors I Laboratory (Fa) Laboratory 3 hours per week. Students may not receive credit for both CHEM 1211L and CHEM 1101L. Corequisite: CHEM 1213.

CHEM1213 Chemistry for Majors I (Fa) The first half of a two-semester course designed especially for students planning to major in chemistry or biochemistry. Students may not receive credit for both CHEM 1213 and CHEM 1103. Corequisite: CHEM 1211L and related course component drill section for CHEM 1213. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1203 or higher or satisfactory completion of the mathematics proficiency exam.

CHEM1221L Chemistry for Majors II Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory 3 hours per week. Students may not receive credit for both CHEM 1221L and CHEM 1121L. Corequisite: CHEM 1223.

CHEM1223 Chemistry for Majors II (Sp) The second half of a two-semester course designed especially for students planning to major in chemistry or biochemistry. Students may not receive credit for both CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1123. Corequisite: CHEM 1221L and related course component drill section for CHEM 1223. Prerequisite: CHEM 1213 and CHEM 1211L (or CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1101L).

CHEM2262 Analytical Chemistry Lecture (Sp, Fa) Principles of chemical separations and analysis by classical and instrumental methods. The role of chemical equilibrium in physical and biological systems. Primarily for students in agriculture, biological, and physical sciences. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L (or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M, or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L, or CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L) and MATH 1203 or higher.

CHEM2272 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Primarily for students in agricultural, biological, and physical sciences. Provides experience in the techniques of classical and instrumental methods of chemical separation and analysis. Laboratory 8 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 2262. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L (or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M, or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L or CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L) and MATH 1203 or higher.

CHEM2611L Organic Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (Sp, Su) Laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 2613.

CHEM2613 Organic Physiological Chemistry (Sp, Su) Survey of organic chemistry necessary for understanding of biological systems, with some related physiological chemistry. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 2611L and related course component drill section for CHEM 2613. Prerequisite: CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L or (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L, or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M, or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L).

CHEM3203 Forensic Chemistry (Fa) Survey of chemistry used in criminal investigations. Topics may include detection and identification of drugs, alcohol, toxins, explosives and gun powder residue. Chemical analysis of paint, ink, paper, soil, glass and fibers. Chemical detection of blood and fingerprints. Extraction of DNA from evidence, DNA fingerprinting. Prerequisite: CHEM 3613 (recommended) or CHEM 2613.

CHEM3451L Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Fa) Techniques of physical measurements of chemical systems; error analysis and report writing. Experiments in thermochemistry, kinetics, and measurement of properties of matter using a variety of techniques. Laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3453.

CHEM3453 Elements of Physical Chemistry (Fa) Fundamental concepts of physical chemistry primarily for B.A. Chemistry majors and pre-professional and agriculture students, presented with some recourse to calculus and with applications to life processes and biochemistry. Lecture 3 hours per week. B.A. chemistry majors must enroll in CHEM 3451L concurrently. Prerequisite: CHEM 2262 and CHEM 2272 and PHYS 2033 and PHYS 2031L (or PHYS 2074), and MATH 2554 (or MATH 2043).

CHEM3504 Physical Chemistry (Fa) Introduction to atomic and molecular structure, kinetic theory of gases, and elementary statistical mechanisms. Lecture and recitation 4 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 2564. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L or (CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L) and PHYS 2074.

CHEM3512L Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Sp) Experimental studies of molecular structure, thermochemistry, and chemical kinetics, and the determination of other physicochemical properties of matter. Laboratory 8 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3504.

CHEM3514 Physical Chemistry II (Sp) Chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibrium; introduction to the structure and properties of solution, liquid state and solid state; and chemical kinetics. Lecture and recitation 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3504.

CHEM3601L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (Su, Fa) Laboratory exercises in organic chemistry. Meets 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3603.

CHEM3602M Honors Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (Su, Fa) Corequisite: CHEM 3603H and related course component drill section for CHEM 3602M.

CHEM3603 Organic Chemistry I (Su, Fa) Lecture 3 hours per week. Primarily for non-majors and B.A. chemistry majors who do not take the CHEM 3703/3702L-3713/ 3712L sequence. Corequisite: CHEM 3601L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3603. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L.

CHEM3603H Honors Organic Chemistry I (Su, Fa) Corequisite: CHEM 3602M and related course component drill section for CHEM 3603H. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and 1121L or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L.

CHEM3611L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (Sp, Su) Laboratory exercise in organic chemistry. Meets 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3613.

CHEM3612M Honors Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (Sp, Su) Corequisite: CHEM 3613H and related course component drill section for CHEM 3612M.

CHEM3613 Organic Chemistry II (Sp, Su) Lecture 3 hours per week. Primarily for non-majors and B.A. chemistry majors who do not take the CHEM 3703/3702L and 3713/3712L sequence. Corequisite: CHEM 3611L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3613. Prerequisite: CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L or (CHEM 3603H and CHEM 3602M) or CHEM 3703 and CHEM 3702L.

CHEM3613H Honors Organic Chemistry II (Sp, Su) Corequisite: CHEM 3612M and related course component drill section for CHEM 3613H. Prerequisite: CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3602M.

CHEM3702L Organic Chemistry I Lab for Majors (Fa) Introduction to basic techniques for separation, purification, and identification of organic compounds. Lecture-discussion 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3703 and related course component drill section for CHEM 3702L.

CHEM3703 Organic Chemistry I Lecture for Majors (Fa) Basic chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Primarily for B.S. and B.A. chemistry majors. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3702L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3703. Prerequisite: Chemistry major; CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L or CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M or CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L.

CHEM3712L Organic Chemistry II Lab for Majors (Sp) Continuation of CHEM 3702L and introduction to basic techniques of synthesis, isolation, and determination of structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Lecture-discussion and laboratory 8 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3713 and related course component drill section for CHEM 3712L.

CHEM3713 Organic Chemistry II Lecture for Majors (Sp) Basic chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Primarily for B.S. and B.A. chemistry majors. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3712L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3713. Prerequisite: CHEM 3703 and CHEM 3702L.

CHEM3813 Introduction to Biochemistry (Su, Fa) Primarily for students in the agricultural, biological, and related sciences. Survey of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Credit may not be applied to the minimum hourly requirements for a B.S. major in chemistry. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: (CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L or CHEM 3613H and CHEM 3611M) or CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L or CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L.

CHEM3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue. Offered as a part of the honors program. Prerequisite: honors candidacy (may not be restricted to candidacy in chemistry).

CHEM400V Chemistry Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Research problems.

CHEM4011H Honors Seminar (Sp) Research seminar for chemistry majors enrolled in the program. Enrollment is required each spring semester for honors students. Senior honors students must make one research presentation to graduate with honors. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CHEM4123 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (Fa) Reactions and properties of inorganic compounds from the standpoint of electronic structure and the periodic table. Emphasis on recent developments. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514.

CHEM4211L Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (Sp) Provides laboratory experience in parallel with the lecture material in CHEM 4213. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 4213.

CHEM4213 Instrumental Analysis (Sp) Provides students, especially those in the agricultural, biological, and physical sciences, with an understanding of modern instrumental techniques of analysis. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2262 and CHEM 2272 and CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L (or CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L) and CHEM 3514 (or CHEM 3453).

CHEM4723 Experimental Methods in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry (Fa) Introduction to the application of synthetic and spectroscopic methods in organic and inorganic chemistry, including mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet-visible, and infrared spectroscopy. Other laboratory techniques applicable to chemical research will be included. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 6 hours per week. Chemistry students may not receive graduate credit for this course and CHEM 5753. Corequisite: Drill component and Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L (or CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L) and CHEM 3504 and CHEM 3514.

CHEM4813H Honors Biochemistry I (Fa) The first of a two-course series covering biochemistry for undergraduate students in biology, agriculture, and chemistry. Topics covered include protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, enzyme mechanisms, and carbohydrate metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L or CHEM 3613H and CHEM 3611M or CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L. (Same as CHEM 5813)

CHEM4843H Honors Biochemistry II (Sp) A continuation of CHEM 4813H covering topics including biological membranes and bioenergetics, photosynthesis, lipids and lipid metabolism, nucleic acid structure, structure and synthesis, and molecular biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 4813H (Same as CHEM 5843)

CHEM4853 Biochemical Techniques (Sp) Techniques for handling, purifying and analyzing enzymes, structural proteins, and nucleic acids. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 6 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 5813 or CHEM 3813.

CHEM498V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

CHEM5101 Introduction to Research (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduces new graduate students to research opportunities and skills in chemistry and biochemistry. Meets 1 hour per week during which new students receive information from faculty regarding research programs in the department and training in the use of research support facilities available in the department.

CHEM5143 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (Irregular) Chemistry of metallic and non-metallic elements emphasizing molecular structure, bonding and the classification of reactions. Emphasis on recent developments. Prerequisite: CHEM 4123.

CHEM5153 Structural Chemistry (Irregular) Determination of molecular structure by spectroscopic, diffraction, and other techniques. Illustrative examples will be chosen mainly from inorganic chemistry. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 3504 and CHEM 4123.

CHEM5223 Chemical Instrumentation (Odd years, Sp) Use and application of operational amplifiers to chemical instrumentation; digital electronic microprocessor interfacing; software development and real-time data acquisition. Prerequisite: CHEM 4213 and PHYS 2074.

CHEM5233 Chemical Separations (Even years, Fa) Modern separation methods including liquid chromatography (adsorption, liquid-liquid partition, ion exchange, exclusion) and gas chromatography. Theory and instrumentation is discussed with emphasis on practical aspects of separation science. Prerequisite: CHEM 4213.

CHEM5243 Electrochemical Methods of Analysis (Even years, Sp) Topics will include: diffusion, electron transfer kinetics, and reversible and irreversible electrode processes; followed by a discussion of chronoamperometry, chronocoulometry, polarography, voltammetry and chronopotentiometry. Prerequisite: CHEM 4213 and MATH 2574.

CHEM5253 Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis (Odd years, Fa) Principles and methods of modern spectroscopic analysis. Optics and instrumentation necessary for spectroscopy is also discussed. Topics include atomic and molecular absorption and emission techniques in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral regions. Prerequisite: CHEM 4213.

CHEM5263 Nuclear Chemistry (Odd years, Fa) Nuclear structure and properties, natural and artificial radioactivity, radioactive decay processes, nuclear reaction and interactions of radiation with matter. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514.

CHEM5273 Cosmochemistry (Odd years, Sp) Laws of distribution of the chemical elements in nature, cosmic and terrestrial abundance of elements; origin and age of the earth, solar system, and the universe. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514.

CHEM5473 Chemical Kinetics (Sp) Theory and applications of the principles of kinetics to reactions between substances, both in the gaseous state and in solution. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514.

CHEM5513 Biochemical Evolution (Even years, Sp) Abiotic synthesis of biomolecules on Earth, the origin of cells, genetic information, origin of life on Earth and elsewhere, evolution and diversity, ecological niches, bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, novel metabolic reshaping of the environment, life being reshaped by the environment, molecular data and evolution. Prerequisite: CHEM 5813.

CHEM5603 Theoretical Organic Chemistry (Fa) Introduction to the theoretical interpretation of reactivity, reaction mechanisms, and molecular structure of organic compounds. Application of theories of electronic structure; emphasis on recent developments. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514 and CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L.

CHEM5633 Organic Reactions (Fa) The more important types of organic reactions and their applications to various classes of compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514 and CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L.

CHEM5753 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry (Fa) Interpretation of physical measurements of organic compounds in terms of molecular structure. Emphasis on spectroscopic methods (infrared, ultraviolet, magnet resonance, and mass spectra). Prerequisite: CHEM 3712L and CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3514.

CHEM5813 Biochemistry I (Fa) The first of a two-course series covering biochemistry for graduate students in biology, agriculture, and chemistry. Topics covered include protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, enzyme mechanisms, and carbohydrate metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 3712L and CHEM 3713 (or CHEM 3613 and CHEM 3611L) and CHEM 3514 (or CHEM 3453 and CHEM 3451L).

CHEM5843 Biochemistry II (Sp) A continuation of CHEM 5813 covering topics including biological membranes and bioenergetics, photosynthesis, lipids and lipid metabolism, nucleic acid structure, structure and synthesis, and molecular biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 5813.

CHEM600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM6011 Chemistry Seminar (Sp, Fa) Members of the faculty, graduate and advanced students meet weekly for discussion of current chemical research. Weekly seminar sections are offered for the Departmental seminar and for divisional seminars in biochemistry and in analytical, inorganic, nuclear, organic, and physical chemistry. Chemistry graduate students register for the Departmental seminar section and one of the divisional seminar sections each semester they are in residence. Seminar credit does not count toward the minimum hourly requirements for any chemistry graduate degree. Prerequisite: CHEM 3514 and CHEM 3712L and CHEM 3713 and senior or graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 1 hours of degree credit.

CHEM619V Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (Irregular) (1-3) Topics which have been covered in the past include: technique and theory of x-ray diffraction, electronic structure of transition metal complexes, inorganic reaction mechanisms, and physical methods in inorganic chemistry.

CHEM6283 Mass Spectrometry (Odd years, Sp) This course is devoted to the fundamental principles and applications of analytical mass spectrometry. Interactions of ions with magnetic and electric fields and the implications with respect to mass spectrometer design are considered, as are the various types of mass spectrometer sources. Representative applications of mass spectrometry in chemical analysis are also discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM629V Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (Irregular) (1-3) Topics that have been presented in the past include: electroanalytical techniques, kinetics of crystal growth, studies of electrode processes, lasers in chemical analysis, nucleosynthesis and isotopic properties of meteorites, thermoluminescence of geological materials, early solar system chemistry and analytical cosmochemistry.

CHEM649V Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (Irregular) (1-3) Topics which have been covered in the past include advanced kinetics, solution chemistry, molecular spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and methods of theoretical chemistry.

CHEM6633 Chemistry of Organic Natural Products (Irregular) Selected topics concerned with structure elucidation and synthesis of such compounds as alkaloids, antibiotics, bacterial metabolites, plant pigments, steroids, terpenoids, etc. Prerequisite: CHEM 5603 and CHEM 5633.

CHEM6673 Organic Reaction Mechanisms (Odd years, Fa) A detailed description of the fundamental reactions and mechanisms of organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 5633.

CHEM669V Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (Irregular) (1-3) Topics which have been presented in the past include heterogeneous catalysis, isotope effect studies of organic reaction mechanisms, organometallic chemistry, stereochemistry, photochemistry, and carbanion chemistry.

CHEM6823 Physical Biochemistry (Even years, Fa) Physical chemistry of proteins, nucleic acids, and biological membranes. Ultracentrifugation, absorption and fluorescent spectrophotometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and other techniques. Prerequisite: (CHEM 5813 and CHEM 3514) or graduate standing.

CHEM6863 Enzymes (Odd years, Fa) Isolation, characterization, and general chemical and biochemical properties of enzymes. Kinetics, mechanisms, and control of enzyme reactions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing (or CHEM 5843 and CHEM 5813).

CHEM6873 Molecular Biochemistry (Odd years, Sp) Nucleic acid chemistry in vitro and in vivo, synthesis of DNA and RNA, genetic diseases, cancer biochemistry and genetic engineering. Prerequisite: CHEM 5813 and CHEM 5843.

CHEM6883 Bioenergetics and Biomembranes (Even years, Sp) Cellular energy metabolism, photosynthesis, membrane transport, properties of membrane proteins, and the application of thermodynamics to biological systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 5813 and CHEM 5843.

CHEM700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

(CHIN) Chinese

CHIN1003 Elementary Chinese I (Fa)

CHIN1013 Elementary Chinese II (Sp) Elementary courses stress correct pronunciation, Aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability, and lead to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

CHIN2003 Intermediate Chinese I (Fa) Intermediate courses lead to greater facility in spoken language and to more advanced reading skills.

CHIN2013 Intermediate Chinese II (Sp) Continued development of basic speaking comprehension and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills.

CHIN3003 Advanced Chinese (Fa) Continues to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and presents more complex forms and structures of the language as well as additional characters. Prerequisite: CHIN 2013

CHIN3033 Conversation (Irregular) Guided conversation practice for the post-intermediate student. Prerequisite: CHIN 2013 or equivalent.

CHIN3103 Chinese Culture and Film (Fa) A course based on film and readings designed to give insight into Chinese civilization and culture with special emphasis on ethnicity, modern history, contemporary society, education, language, customs, and visual arts. This course is taught in English. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CHIN3983 Special Studies (Irregular) May be offered in subject not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(CIED) Curriculum and Instruction

CIED1002 Introduction to Education (Sp, Su, Fa) Integrates psychological, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education with concurrent involvement in field experiences. Encourages prospective teachers to become reflective practitioners by emphasizing organization of school systems, planning and implementation of effective classroom environments, development of teaching styles, and new directions in education. Corequisite: CIED 1011.

CIED1003 Introduction to Technology in Education (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of computer technology as it relates to teacher education. This course introduces students interested in teacher education to the knowledge and skills required to demonstrate their proficiency in technology and learning.

CIED1011 Introduction to Education: Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) A 30-hour early field experience designed to give prospective teachers opportunities to observe and participate in a variety of school settings. Includes a variety of field-based activities to encourage personal reflection. Special focus upon organization of school systems, effective classroom environments, teaching styles and new directions in education. Corequisite: CIED 1002. (Same as CATE 1001,PHED 1003)

CIED3001 Early Childhood Education Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) This practicum course provides opportunities for students to observe and practice providing instruction and guidance in preschool settings. Corequisite: CIED 3003.

CIED3003 Early Childhood Education (Sp, Su) The study of kindergarten and preschool programs: social context of early childhood education, purposes, research basis, curriculum development, methods, and materials. Corequisite: CIED 3001. Prerequisite: CIED 1002 and CIED 1011.

CIED3023 Survey of Exceptionalities (Sp, Su, Fa) A survey of the characteristics of students with exceptional needs. Reviews the definitions of exceptionalities, learning and behavior characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities and the legal basis for the education of persons with exceptionalities in both elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: CIED 1002 and CIED 1011; or MUED 2012; or CATE 1001; or AGED 1031.

CIED3033 Classroom Learning Theory (Sp, Su, Fa) A survey of the major theories of learning with special emphasis on human learning and implications for education. Prerequisite: CIED 1002 and CIED 1011; or MUED 2012; or PHED 1003; or CATE 1001; or AGED 1031; and PSYC 2003.

CIED3043 Introduction to Middle Level Principles and Methods (Fa) A comprehensive overview of the key components, principles, methodologies, and research foundations to middle level education. Reflective activities and site-based field experience are integrated with course content to provide continuity between theory and practice. Portfolio expectations will be a primary means of course evaluation. Prerequisite: CIED 3053.

CIED3053 The Emerging Adolescent (Sp) This course is a study of the developmental characteristics (social, emotional, physical, moral, and intellectual) of early adolescents (ages 10-15 years). The implications of these changes for motivation, instruction, learning, and classroom management in the classroom are emphasized. Course has field component. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIED 3033. Prerequisite: CIED 1011 and CIED 1002 and PSYC 2003.

CIED3063 Literacy Strategies for Middle Level Learners (Sp) This course is designed to examine theories and practice regarding literacy development and assessment grounded in the knowledge of the characteristics of the middle level learner. A ten-hour field experience is required. Corequisite: CIED 3073. Prerequisite: CIED 3043.

CIED3063H Honors Literacy Strategies for Middle Level Learners (Sp) This course is designed to examine theories and practice regarding literacy development and assessment grounded in in the knowledge of the characteristics of the middle level learner. A ten-hour field experience is required. Corequisite: CIED 3073 and honors candidacy. Prerequisite: CIED 3043.

CIED3073 Early Adolescent Literature (Sp) A study of rationales and strategies for incorporating early adolescent literature across the middle level curriculum. Includes an examination of genres and selected texts from each. Corequisite: CIED 3063. Prerequisite: CIED 3043.

CIED3073H Honors Early Adolescent Literature (Sp) A study of rationales and strategies for incorporating early adolescent literature across the middle level curriculum. Includes an examination of genres and selected texts from each. Corequisite: CIED 3063. Prerequisite: CIED 3043 and honors candidacy.

CIED3093 Essentials of Literacy (Sp, Fa) An undergraduate foundational course focusing on literacy development and processes of children from the emergent to developmental stages, materials and effective research-based teaching strategies for classroom practice. Not for credit in Childhood Education (CHED) degree program.

CIED3103 Children's Literature (Fa) A survey of children's literary works, authors, and illustrators with emphasis on the preschool and primary grade literature. Corequisite: CIED 3113. Prerequisite: PSYC 3093.

CIED3103H Honors Children's Literature (Fa) A survey of children's literary works, authors, and illustrators with emphasis on the preschool and primary grade literature. Corequisite: CIED 3113. Prerequisite: PSYC 3093.

CIED3113 Emergent and Developmental Literacy (Fa) This course focuses on theories of children's emerging literacy and on the continuing development of literacy abilities in pre-kindergarten and early elementary years. Corequisite: CIED 3103. Prerequisite: PSYC 3033 or PSYC 3093.

CIED3113H Honors Emergent and Developmental Literacy (Fa) This course focuses on theories of children's emerging literacy and on the continuing development of literacy abilities in pre-kindergarten and early elementary years. Corequisite: CIED 3103. Prerequisite: PSYC 3033 or PSYC 3093.

CIED3123 Mathematics Methods (Sp, Su) An examination of the content of elementary mathematics courses. Special emphasis given to methods of teaching the content as well as enrichment materials.

CIED3133 Integrated Social Studies (Sp, Fa) Focuses on the methodology of facilitating pre-K and elementary children's development in language arts and social studies. Integrates the curriculum and teaching strategies in language arts and social studies.

CIED3143 Teaching Science (Sp, Fa) Study of the methods and materials in teaching science. Classroom applications of teaching strategies with analysis of teacher effectiveness in seminar settings are emphasized.

CIED3263 Language Development for the Educator (Sp, Fa) Nature of speech-language development in preschool and school-aged children, including cognitive prerequisites, social contexts, and relationships between language acquisition and literacy. Language differences (dialectal, bilingual) and speech-language disorders are explored. The role of the educator in facilitating language acquisition is emphasized.

CIED4003 Elementary Seminar (Sp, Fa) This course is designed to synthesize the foundational content presented in the Bachelor of Science in Education, Elementary Education program. It focuses on refinement of generalized knowledge to accommodate specialized content relevant to young children.

CIED4023 Teaching in Inclusive Secondary Settings (Su) This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach in inclusive classroom settings at the secondary level. Course content will focus on the ways in which exceptionality, specifically focused on high-incidence disabilities and culture, specifically focused on English language learners mediate the learning experiences of secondary level students.

CIED4101 Practicum (Sp) Practicum. Corequisite: CIED 4113 and CIED 4128.

CIED4101H Honors Practicum (Sp) Practicum. Corequisite: CIED 4113 and CIED 4128.

CIED4113 Integrated Communication Skills (Sp) Focuses on the methodology of facilitating pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and early elementary children's literacy development. Emphasis is on the integration of the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening across the curriculum. Corequisite: CIED 4128 and CIED 4101. Prerequisite: PSYC 3093, CIED 3103, and CIED 3113.

CIED4113H Honors Integrated Communication Skills (Sp) Focuses on the methodology of facilitating pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and early elementary children's literacy development. Emphasis is on the integration of the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening across the curriculum. Corequisite: CIED 4128 and CIED 4101. Prerequisite: PSYC 3093, CIED 3103, and CIED 3113.

CIED4123 Literacy Assessment (Sp, Fa) An undergraduate course focusing on literacy assessment and intervention for prospective classroom teachers. Participants become familiar with assessment procedures and instruments for identifying student strengths and weaknesses in literacy, determining effective intervention strategies for literacy improvement, and principles of reporting assessment and intervention outcomes. Prerequisite: CIED 3093.

CIED4131 Practicum in Secondary Education (Sp, Su, Fa) This practicum is a requirement for entry into the Secondary Master of Arts (M.A.T.) in teaching program. Students will be involved in documented experiences with children for a minimum of 60 hours with at least 20 of them being in schools with children in grades 7 through 12.

CIED4133 Measurement, Research, and Readings (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to provide an introduction to educational assessment, research methods, and what research has to say about trends and topics in elementary education.

CIED4143 Curriculum Design (Su) A course in the design and adaptation of curriculum for students in regular, elementary classrooms. Theoretical bases and curriculum models will be reviewed.

CIED4153 Classroom Management (Sp, Fa) This course focuses on a number of different management techniques for Pre-K through upper elementary grades that can be used in general education settings.

CIED4163 Senior Project (Sp, Fa) This course is designed to provide students with the research skills necessary to complete their senior project.

CIED4173 Student Teaching (Sp, Fa) This course is a field-based practicum experience.

CIED4201 Seminar: Introduction to Professionalism (Sp) Examines the legal, ethical, and moral aspects of teaching and involvement in professional organizations. Students participate in field experiences, simulations, and discussions. Corequisite: CIED 4210 and CIED 4211 and CIED 4221.

CIED4210 Practicum: Critical and Creative Thinking Skills (Sp, Su, Fa) Practicum in which students apply theory to practice. Emphasis is on actual application of theory to their own creative and critical thinking skills, methods for transferring the knowledge of theory to classroom application in their curricular area(s), and curriculum development. Corequisite: CIED 4201 and CIED 4221.

CIED4211 Seminar: Critical and Creative Thinking Skills (Sp, Su, Fa) Provides a basic understanding of how to incorporate creative thinking skills across the curriculum. Students are introduced to a variety of strategies as well as site-based field experiences which provide continuity between theory and practice. Corequisite: CIED 4201 and CIED 4210 and CIED 4221.

CIED4221 Seminar: Structure of the Disciplines (Sp, Su, Fa) An analysis of the cognitive properties and organizations possible for subject disciplines. Looks at ways to discover understanding of a discipline and how to teach students to discover understanding. Corequisite: CIED 4201 and CIED 4210 and CIED 4211.

CIED4323 Instructional Design for Teachers (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the design of instruction for students with exceptionalities. Emphasis is placed on synthesizing a broad range of existing and emerging perspectives and methods of instruction and applying them to practical classroom practice. Prerequisite: CIED 3023.

CIED4413 Acquiring a Second Language (Fa) The course gives an introduction to the basics in research and learning theories involved in the acquisition of second languages and cultures, particularly of English.

CIED4423 Teaching a Second Language (Sp, Fa) This courses gives an introduction to different methods used to teach individuals a second language, with an emphasis on teaching English as a second language.

CIED4513 Teaching Children with Mild Disabilities (Sp, Fa) This course is a study of the characteristics of young students with disabilities and methods for teaching this group of students. The course will provide future teachers with an understanding of interventions useful in teaching individuals with special learning needs during grades P-4.

CIED4513H Honors Teaching Children with Mild Disabilities (Sp, Fa) This course is a study of the characteristics of young students with disabilities and methods for teaching this group of students. The course will provide future teachers with an understanding of interventions useful in teaching individuals with special learning needs during grades P-4.

CIED4523 Teaching Children with Severe Disabilities (Sp, Su) This course is a study of the characteristics of young students with severe disabilities and methods for teaching this group of students. The course will provide future teachers with an understanding of interventions useful in teaching individuals with special learning needs during grades P-4.

CIED5003 Childhood Seminar (Sp) This course is designed to synthesize the foundational content presented in the Master of Arts in Teaching core courses. It focuses on refinement of the generalized knowledge to accommodate specialized content children. Professional attitudes, knowledge and skills relevant to young children. Professional attitudes, knowledge and skills applicable to today's early childhood educator are addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the CHED M.A.T.

CIED5012 Measurement, Research, and Statistical Concepts for Teachers (Su) An introduction to constructing, analyzing, and interpreting tests, types of research and the research process, qualitative and quantitative techniques for assessment, and descriptive and inferential statistics.

CIED5013 Measurement, Research and Statistical Concepts in the Schools (Su) An introduction to constructing, analyzing, and interpreting tests; types of research and the research process; qualitative and quantitative techniques for assessment; and descriptive and inferential statistics. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school.

CIED5022 Classroom Management Concepts (Fa) A number of different classroom management techniques are studied. It is assumed that a teacher must possess a wide range of knowledge and skills to be an effective classroom manager. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5032 Curriculum Design Concepts for Teachers (Sp) The design and adaptation of curriculum for students in regular and special classrooms. Theoretical bases and curriculum models are reviewed. Concurrent clinical experiences in each area of emphasis are included. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5043 Content Area Reading in Elementary Grades (Su, Fa) This course teaches the integration of reading and writing in the content areas. Reading and writing as integrated strands of the language process is presented in the context of instructional principles and suggested teaching practices. A solid research base is emphasized while keeping the focus on practical application. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5052 Seminar: Multicultural Issues (Su) This seminar provides an introduction to the major concepts and issues related to multicultural education. The ways in which race, ethnicity, class, gender, and exceptionality influence students' behavior are discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5053 Multicultural Issues in Elementary Education (Su) This course provides an introduction to the major concepts and issues related to multicultural education in elementary classrooms. The ways in which race, class, gender and exceptionality influence students' behavior are discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to grad. school.

CIED5062 Literacies Across the Curriculum (Sp) This course teaches the integration of reading, writing, and new literacies in the content areas. Theory and strategy are presented as integrated strands of the language process as presented in the context of instructional principles and suggested teaching practices. A solid research base is emphasized while keeping the focus on practical application. Prerequisite: Admission in Secondary M.A.T. Program.

CIED5063 Contemporary and Futuristic Concerns of Childhood Education (Sp) Historical, Contemporary and Future Perspective of Childhood Education. A problems course in childhood education which deals with historical, current and future concerns. These early childhood concerns include demographic trends, family composition and change, instructional models, social/political/economic issues, parent/community involvement, and evolving professional roles. Prerequisite: Admission to the CHED M.A.T. program.

CIED5073 Case Study in Childhood Education (Sp) Provides the students with experience in conducting case studies related to childhood education. In addition, students gain knowledge regarding practices used in ethnographic research. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A.T. program.

CIED508V Childhood Education Cohort Teaching Internship (Sp, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED5093 Methods of Instruction for Middle Level I (Su) A study of methods and materials in the special content areas (math, science, English/language arts, and social studies). The planning of instruction, microteaching, and the development of middle school instructional materials are included. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A.T. program.

CIED5103 Advanced Middle Level Principles (Sp) An in-depth examination of recent research on the major issues, practices, and policies for middle level education. Emphasis is on analysis of cutting edge issues germane to the life, education, and welfare of the early adolescent via the integration of theory and practice. Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Arts in Teaching program.

CIED5113 Reading in Middle Schools (Sp, Su, Fa) An overview of methods and materials for teaching reading to early adolescents. Reflective activities and site-based field experiences are integrated with course content to provide continuity between theory and practice. Portfolio expectations will be a primary means of course evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to the middle level education program and CIED 3113.

CIED5123 Writing Process Across the Curriculum (Middle Level) (Sp) This course will provide an overview of the research, and methods for incorporating writing across all curriculum. Writing as a process will be emphasized. Reflective activities and site-based field experience will be integrated into the course content. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A.T. Program.

CIED5132 Research in Middle Level Curriculum and Instruction (Fa) An introduction to inquiry and research in middle level curriculum and instruction. It examines the principles, strategies, and techniques of research, especially qualitative inquiry. Practicum in educational research and evaluation is done as part of the class. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT program.

CIED5143 Internship: Middle Level (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) The internship for middle level education is an extended field experience in which a pre-service teacher integrates knowledge and skills developed in education classes with practice in the field. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5162 Applied Practicum (Fa) Provides laboratory experiences for RDNG 5123 (Literacy Assessment) and RDNG 113 (Reading in Early Childhood Education). Corequisite: CIED 5183 and CIED 5173. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5173 Literacy Assessment and Intervention (Su, Fa) Focuses on assessment of young children's literacy skills. Techniques discussed include informal observation, miscue analysis, and portfolio assessment. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school.

CIED5183 Readings in Early Childhood Education (Fa) Will continue to develop understandings of classic studies and will explore the impact these have had on the most recent issues in early childhood education. Prerequisite: Admission to the CHED M.A.T.

CIED5193 Methods of Instruction for Middle School II (Fa) Second special methods course for teaching at the middle level. Emphasizes further refinement of teaching skills and methods; the integration of the sciences, mathematics, and technology; science, technology, and society (STS) issues; and the integration of social studies and English language arts. Prerequisite: CIED 5092 and admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5223 Issues and Principles of Secondary Education (Su) This course provides an introduction to the Secondary Education M.A.T. program. It provides the student with information about foundation issues in education, including history and philosophy of American Education, current trends and issues in education, psychological and social theories of education, characteristics of learners, and learning processes. Prerequisite: Admission to M.A.T. degree program.

CIED5232 Interdisciplinary Studies (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to the nature of interdisciplinary study: curricular content, course planning (topics and themes), instructional strategies, and evaluation and assessment. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5243 Special Methods of Instruction I (Su) Study of the methods and materials in the special content areas. Includes philosophical, cognitive, and psychological dimensions of teaching the content area. The planning of instruction, microteaching, and the development of instructional materials are included. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5253 Special Methods of Instruction II (Fa) Study of the methods and materials in the special content areas. Classroom applications of teaching strategies with analysis of teacher effectiveness in seminar settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5262 Special Methods of Instruction III (Sp) Study of the methods and materials in the special content areas. The focus is on student-centered and interdisciplinary teaching strategies. Extended content units are developed and implemented in the partnership school setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. Program.

CIED5263 Measurement and Evaluation (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of measurement, testing, and evaluative procedures including types of tests, abuses of tests, test construction, scoring, analysis and interpretation, statistical methods, and alternative evaluation and assessment techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED5273 Research in Curriculum and Instruction (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to inquiry and research in curriculum and instruction. It examines the principles, strategies, and techniques of research, especially qualitative inquiry. Qualitative method in assessment and evaluation are considered. Practicum in educational research and evaluation is done as part of the class. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A.T. program.

CIED528V Secondary Cohort Teaching Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED5293 Special Methods, Interdisciplinary Section (Sp) The third and final part of the middle level special methods course. Provides interns with the knowledge, dispositions, and skills for developing an interdisciplinary course of study in conjunction with the members of their interdisciplinary team. Prerequisite: CIED 5092 and CIED 5913 and admission to M.A.T. program.

CIED5323 Transition Planning for Persons with Disabilities (Sp) Prepares students to plan, evaluate, and implement transition programs within both regular and special classrooms at the elementary, middle and secondary school levels.

CIED532V Practicum in Special Education (Irregular) (1-6) Supervised field experiences in special education programs, schools, institutions, and other facilities for exceptional children.

CIED5343 Applied Classroom Management (Fa) An advanced course in managing behaviors in students with exceptionalities. Students are provided with experiences in applying theoretical bases of classroom management through identifying, assessing graphing, and analyzing behavioral data and implementing management plans. Ethical issues in classroom management are addressed.

CIED5353 Teaching Students with Diverse Needs in Middle Education Settings (Irregular) To provide future scholar-practitioners with a knowledge base concerning the issues involved in the successful instruction of persons with special learning needs during middle school years.

CIED5393 Introduction to Linguistics (Fa) This course is an introduction to human language. The goal is to understand what it means to speak a language, including an introduction to phonetics and phonology (specifically the sound system of American English), morphology (the rules of English at the word level), syntax (rules that govern sentence level language), semantics (meanings of words) and sociolinguistics (or the study of language use in its social context).

CIED5403 Early Childhood Education: Rationale and Curriculum (Irregular) Rationale and curriculum of an early childhood education program, with special attention given curricular frameworks and professional organization policies.

CIED5423 Curriculum Reconstruction (Sp, Su, Fa) Changes in curriculum development and design as related to changing social/economic/political arenas. Theories of curriculum development, implementation and evaluation are researched.

CIED5433 Methods and Materials for Teaching Children's and Adolescent Literature (Sp, Su, Fa) Issues and trends in children's literature. Contemporary works are evaluated and reviewed based on changing social political conditions. Multicultural approach to children's literature is emphasized. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in children's literature.

CIED5453 Evaluation Techniques (Irregular) Evaluation of learning using traditional means of assessment as well as alternative or authentic assessment techniques.

CIED5473 Advanced Course in Children's Literature (Irregular) Compares and contrasts contemporary award winning books with children's classics, analyzing elements of style. Focuses on use of rhetorical devices. Prerequisite: CIED 3103 and CIED 5433.

CIED5483 Teaching Mathematics (Irregular) Content, methods, and materials for teaching multiple strands of elementary school mathematics. Emphasis on principles and procedures of a conceptual and integrated approach to learning mathematics. Prerequisite: Undergrad coursework in teaching elementary or early childhood mathematics.

CIED5493 Teaching Social Studies (Irregular) Purpose, content, psychology, materials, and methods for teaching the social sciences in the elementary school. Emphasis on principles and procedures for combining the social studies with other areas of the curriculum in broad unit instruction. Prerequisite: Undergraduate coursework in teaching elementary or early childhood social studies.

CIED5503 Teaching Science (Sp, Su, Fa) The influence of science on the community, on the home, and the child. Use of science in the living and learning of the child at school.

CIED5513 Sound System of American English (Fa) This course will study the structure and development of American English (AE). Topics include: 1) the structure/systems of American English pronunciation, 2) vowels, 3) consonant system (including such features as minimal pairs, 4) prosody, intonation, rhythm, and stress, and 5) regionalism and social varieties, and 6) pedagogical approaches to teaching the features of American English.

CIED5533 Teaching Language Arts (Sp, Su, Fa) The place of the language arts in the elementary curriculum. Exploration of materials, content, practices, and methods, used in reading, speaking, listening, and writing experiences.

CIED5543 Structures of American English (Sp, Su) This course provides an introduction to the grammars of English, including (but not restricted to traditional, structural, and transformational-generative (universal grammar). It includes approaches to the teaching of all types of grammars.

CIED5563 Teaching Internship/Action Research (Irregular) During this course, Master's candidates will be provided with classroom time to prepare to teach and then will be assigned to a classroom or classrooms. During this time the candidates will have an opportunity (under supervision) to observe, to teach and to participate in classroom activities. Additionally, candidates will research some area of their own pedagogy relevant to the experience.

CIED5573 Foundations of Literacy (Sp, Su, Fa) Teaching of reading to children; techniques, research, and modern practices.

CIED5583 Correlates of Reading Process (Sp, Su, Fa) The developmental program is emphasized through a student of the reading process. Learning theory and research are related to reading instruction and materials through the development and application of evaluative criteria based on an understanding of reading process. Prerequisite: CIED 5573.

CIED5593 Advance Diagnosis and Intervention (Sp, Su, Fa) Emphasizes the diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties in the classroom setting. Students are expected to become familiar with cause of reading failure, diagnosis instruments and procedures, principles of report writing, and corrective instructional methods and materials. The course is open to graduate students with instructor's consent. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: CIED 5573.

CIED5613 Contemporary Issues in Education (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of issues pertaining to the goals, objectives, organization, and curriculum of the schools with an analysis of the teacher's role in dealing with current concerns in these areas.

CIED5623 The School Curriculum (Sp, Su, Fa) General principles and techniques of selecting and organizing curricular materials.

CIED5633 Analysis of Instruction (Sp, Su, Fa) A survey of the research and literature related to the systematic study of the field of teaching. An examination of the definitions of teaching and the knowledge base on which teaching is predicated. A study of the implications of the research of effective teaching and the key curricular and instructional issues.

CIED5653 Methods of Middle School Instruction (Sp, Su, Fa) Philosophy, rationale, and instructional practices of middle school instruction. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CIED567V Teaching Foreign Cultures in Social Studies Curricula (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Extensive examination of foreign cultures (West Europe, USSR, China, Latin America) and methods of teaching about them in secondary school social studies.

CIED5683 Adolescent Literature (Sp, Su, Fa) Content course in adolescent literature including selection, reading, evaluation, and psychological basis of classic and contemporary works. Prerequisite: PSYC 3093 or equivalent.

CIED5723 Nature and Needs of Persons with Mild Disabilities (Fa) Educational, psychological, and social characteristics of individuals who have mild disabilities with emphasis on educational methods and modifications. Prerequisite: CIED 3023.

CIED5733 Inclusive Practices for Diverse Populations (Su) An advanced study of the characteristics of persons with exceptional learning needs and the provision of appropriate instruction in the general education classroom. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

CIED5743 Teaching Persons With Physical and Health Disabilities (Sp) This course is an advanced course at the master's level in the specialty studies. The Scholar Practitioner model at this level will pursue an in-depth study of the characteristics, needs, and methods for teaching of persons with physical and health disabilities while emphasizing advance learning in the specialty studies and the social and behavioral studies in the substantive areas. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

CIED5753 Nature and Needs of Persons with Serious Emotional Disorders (Irregular) A survey of the educational, psychological, and social characteristics of individuals with serious emotional disorders. Four major categories of behaviors (personality disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, and learning/behavior disorders) are reviewed in relationship to identification, assessment, and program intervention within the public school setting. Prerequisite: CIED 3023.

CIED5763 Teaching Children with Severe Disabilities (Sp) Methods and materials for teaching students with severe handicaps, including severe mental retardation, serious emotional disturbance, and severe physical disabilities.

CIED5773 Methods for Young Children with Disabilities (Irregular) This course is one of the substantive core courses required of all students being recommended for the P-4 Instructional Specialist license. The Scholar-Practitioner Model at this level provides an introduction to the education of young children with special learning needs and a foundation for the developing professional.

CIED5783 Professional and Family Partnerships (Sp) This course is an advanced course at the master's level in the specialty studies. The Scholar Practitioner model at this level will pursue an in-depth study of family-school partnerships from early childhood through the transition to adulthood while emphasizing advance learning in the specialty studies and the social and behavioral studies in the substantive areas. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school.

CIED5793 Practicum in Literacy (Sp, Su, Fa) Laboratory experience in which students diagnose reading difficulties and practice remedial measures under the direct supervision of the instructor. Emphasis is given to continuous diagnosis and to the use of commercially produced materials and trade books in remediation. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: CIED 5593.

CIED5803 Nature and Needs of the Gifted and Talented (Fa) Educational, psychological, and social characteristics of gifted and talented children. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CIED5813 Curriculum Development in Gifted and Talented (Sp) Examines the various models for developing curriculum and providing services for students identified for gifted programs. Prerequisite: CIED 5803.

CIED5823 Gifted and Talented (Structured) Practicum (Su) Supervised field experience in gifted education programs, schools, institutions, and other facilities for gifted/talented children. Prerequisite: CIED 5813.

CIED5833 Gifted and Talented (Flex) Practicum (Fa) Students design and implement an individualized practicum experience (Type III Renzulli) that provides the opportunity to refine and enhance personal attitudes, beliefs, and skills in gifted education. Prerequisite: CIED 5823.

CIED5873 Assessment of Exceptional Students (Fa) Methods and techniques of assessment of children in all areas of exceptionality with emphasis on diagnosis and classification.

CIED5883 Research in Special Education (Irregular) Review of research in special education including all areas of exceptionality with emphasis on diagnosis and classification.

CIED5893 Organization, Administration and Supervision of Special Education (Irregular) Procedures, responsibilities and problems of organization, administration, and supervision of special education programs.

CIED5923 Second Language Acquisition (Sp) This is one of four courses leading to Arkansas approved endorsement for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). The course gives an introduction to the basics in research and learning theories involved in the acquisition of second languages and cultures, particularly ESL.

CIED5933 Second Language Methodologies (Fa) This is one of a series of four courses leading to Arkansas approved endorsement for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). The course introduces the basics in approaches, methodologies, techniques, and strategies for teaching second languages, especially ESL.

CIED5943 Teaching People of Other Cultures (Sp) This is one in a series of four courses leading to Arkansas approved endorsement for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). The course focuses on cultural awareness, understanding cultural differences, and instruction methods for integrating second cultures, especially the culture of the United States, into the curriculum.

CIED5953 Second Language Assessment (Sp) This is one in a series of four courses leading to Arkansas approved endorsement for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). The course introduces basic methods for testing, assessing and evaluating second language, especially ESL, learners for placement purposes and academic performance.

CIED5973 Practicum in Secondary Education (Sp, Fa) Students will engage in action research in a school setting to advance their knowledge of teaching and learning venues including schools and informal learning environments. Prerequisite: Permission.

CIED5983 Practicum in C & I (Sp, Su, Fa) This course will provide degree candidates with advance knowledge of teaching in the elementary or secondary schools. This will be accomplished through a semester-long practicum during which an action research project will be designed, enacted, and reported. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.Ed. Program. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED599V Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

CIED6013 Curriculum Development (Fa) Principles and concepts of curriculum and development, with an analysis of the factors basic to planning, the aims of the educational program, the organization of the curriculum, curriculum models, and elements desirable in the curriculum of schools.

CIED6023 Instructional Theory (Irregular) Study of psychological, anthropological, sociological, and educational theories of instruction and learning. Emphasis is placed on synthesizing a broad range of existing and emerging perspectives in understanding individual, interactional and contextual phenomena of instruction and learning. Prerequisite: EDFD 5373.

CIED6033 Content Specific Pedagogy (Irregular) This course explores the relationship between the content of courses taught in schools and the pedagogical principles that the teaching of the content requires. Students will discuss and synthesize findings from the research literature and from personal investigation. Prerequisite: CIED 6203.

CIED6043 Analysis of Teacher Education (Irregular) This course examines issues, problems, trends, and research associated with teacher education programs in early childhood, elementary, special education, and secondary education. Prerequisite: CIED 6023.

CIED6053 Advanced Assessment (Sp) This course provides a survey of assessment methods used to evaluate students' levels of performance in educational settings. Prerequisites: Admissions to EdS or PhD.

CIED6063 Systemic Change In Education (Sp) This course is designed to critically examine education and society and interplay their interdependence between them, to differentiate between meaningful and superficial change, and to explore the agents of change in a diverse and complex social environment. Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.S. or Ph.D program.

CIED6073 Seminar in Developing Creativity (Irregular) A study of the facets of creativity, how they can be applied to be used in one's everyday life, how they can be applied in all classrooms, and how to encourage the development of these in students.

CIED6083 Piaget's Theory and Instruction (Odd years, Sp) Piaget's theory has been applied to classroom instruction in various settings. This course will investigate the theory in depth, study classroom application, and students will devise application. Prerequisite: CIED 6023.

CIED6233 Organization of Reading Programs (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the problem of organizing the classroom, individual school, and school system, for the improvement of reading instruction. Emphasis is given to the development of program organization rationale based on requirements of the teaching-learning setting.

CIED6313 Issues, History, and Rationale of Science Education (Irregular) This course is the foundation experience for those interested in the discipline of science education. It provides an overview of the fundamental issues in and vocabulary of science education. The course includes the research basis for science teaching, the literature of science education, and the issues and controversies surrounding the teaching of science.

CIED6333 Nature of Science: Philosophy of Science for Science Educators (Irregular) The Nature of Science is a hybrid arena consisting of aspects of the philosophy, history and sociology of science along with elements of the psychology of scientific observations all targeting the complete understanding of how science actually functions. Prerequisite: Admission to grad school.

CIED6343 Advanced Science Teaching Methods (Irregular) This course is designed for those educators who have had some previous instruction in science teaching methods and/or had some prior science teaching experience. Students will gain new or renewed perspectives with respect to their personal teaching ability while engaging in discussions and activities designed to assist others in professional grow in science instruction. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school.

CIED6403 Emerging Issues in Special Education (Irregular) A study in the complex issues with which professionals in the field of special education must be familiar and prepared to address.

CIED641V Special Topics in Special Education (Irregular) (1-6) Discussion and advanced studies on select topics in special education. Specific focus on recent developments. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED6433 Legal Aspects of Special Education (Irregular) A study of litigation and legislation in special education, federal and state laws and court cases, and due process hearings.

CIED6443 Advanced Research in Curriculum and Instruction (Sp) This course will provide opportunities for students to acquire the skills, knowledge, and strategies necessary to design and implement a mixed research study. Emphasis is upon developing research questions, developing a mixed research design, selecting a sample, and utilizing appropriate techniques for analyzing data.

CIED6503 Effective Teaching: Concepts and Processes (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to assist students in examining a variety of effective teaching practices and conditions found in classrooms and in acquiring knowledge, concepts, and ideas about ways to effectively influence the interests, learning and development of students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program.

CIED6603 Multicultural Education (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to trace, examine, discuss, and promote understanding of issues related to multicultural education, different views of multicultural education, and the impact of multicultural education upon the schooling process. Emphasis is upon schooling experiences of culturally diverse students, language issues, gender issues, and evaluation issues. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program.

CIED660V Workshop (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

CIED674V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED6803 Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Sp) This course provide students with an understanding of individuals who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. The course provides a life-span perspective by focusing on preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Students will study the characteristics of these individuals and general educational strategies for their education.

CIED680V Ed.S. Project (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

CIED6813 Assessment of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Fa) This course provides an in-depth study of the assessment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. It includes formal and informal assessment measures used to assist in the identification of students with ASD, as well as provide information for program development for this group of students.

CIED6823 Instructional Methods for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Sp) This course is designed to assist professional educators in planning and implementing instructional and support services for students with autism spectrum disorders. Students will learn how to participate in collaborative family, school, and community partnerships.

CIED6833 Practicum in Autism Spectrum Disorders (Sp, Su, Fa) Supervised field experiences in programs, schools, and other settings for children with autism spectrum disorders.

CIED694V Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Discussion and advanced studies on selected topics in curriculum and instruction. Specific focus on recent developments. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CIED695V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

CIED699V Doctoral Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CIED700V Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy

(CLST) Classical Studies

CLST1003 Introduction to Classical Studies: Greece (Odd years, Fa) An introduction to the world of Ancient Greece, from the Trojan War to Alexander the Great. Progresses chronologically, focusing on the literary, artistic, political, and philosophical ideas of the Greeks. Who were they and how are we like them? This course fulfills the second semester world literature requirement.

CLST1003H Honors Introduction to Classical Studies: Greece (Odd years, Fa)

CLST1013 Introduction to Classical Studies: Rome (Even years, Sp) A multi-faceted introduction to Roman culture, focusing on the literature, philosophy, architecture, history, art and archeology. Source material to be read in English. Lectures liberally illustrated with slides. This course fulfills the second semester world literature requirement.

CLST1013H Honors Introduction to Classical Studies: Rome (Even years, Sp)

CLST399VH Honors Course (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CLST4003H Honors Classical Studies Colloquium (Sp) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

(CMJS) Criminal Justice

CMJS2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice (Sp, Fa) Survey of the field of criminal justice, with an emphasis upon law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.

CMJS2053 Critical Thinking and Writing in Criminal Justice (Sp, Fa) An introduction to methods of critical thinking and writing in criminal justice. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003; open to majors only.

CMJS3003 Criminal Law and Society (Sp, Fa) Principles and problems of criminal law in contemporary society. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003.

CMJS3023 Criminology (Sp, Su, Fa) A survey of theories of crime causation, development of law, corrections, victimization, and police and policy. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013 or SOCI 2033. (Same as SOCI 3023)

CMJS3043 The Police and Society (Sp, Fa) Origins, development, and practice of policing, with an emphasis on police organization, problems, and issues in contemporary society. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003.

CMJS3203 Corrections (Fa) A study of the origins, development, and practices related to corrections, including incarceration, community corrections and supervision, and intermediate sanctions. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003. (Same as SOCI 3203)

CMJS3503 Criminal Procedures (Fa) Legal principles of police work, including arrests, force, interviewing, search and seizure. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003.

CMJS3523 Criminal Investigation (Sp) Survey of the theories, concepts, and legal conditions concerning the techniques used in the location, preservation and presentation of evidence. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003.

CMJS399VH Honors Course (Sp, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CMJS4003 Internship in Criminal Justice (Sp, Su) Supervised experience in municipal, county or state criminal justice agency, or any other agency which is approved by instructor. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003.

CMJS4013 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (Sp, Fa) Comprehensive study of varied subjects in contemporary criminal justice. May be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: CMJS 2003 or SOCI 2013. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

CMJS403V Individual Study in Criminal Justice (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) A reading and conference course on special topics in criminal justice.

(CNED) Counselor Education

CNED1002 Life Skills Development (Fa) Study and practice of problem solving, decision making, goals and values clarification and other developmental skills affecting personal issues and academic success. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required.

CNED1011 Seminar (Sp, Fa) Single topic seminar focusing on further knowledge acquisition and training in specific developmental skills. Topics offered as needed. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CNED3053 The Helping Relationship (Sp, Fa) Development of an understanding of the helping relationship. Topics include establishing a working alliance, problem recognition and referral to appropriate resources. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003.

CNED4003 Classroom Human Relations Skills (Sp, Fa) A study of interpersonal skills important to improving teacher-student relationships and achievement in classrooms. Human communication systems related to motivation, achievement, and educator-student relationships are studied. The attainment of effective human relations skills is emphasized. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing required.

CNED5193 Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Sp) An introductory study of community counseling. The course content includes information concerning the educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological foundations of community counseling as well as specific traits and skills of professional community counselors. In addition, the course is designed to provide introductory level concepts and skills required for future certification and licensure as counseling professionals. Prerequisite: Graduate student status.

CNED5203 Foundations of the Counseling Profession (Su, Fa) A study of the counseling profession applicable to school, college and community agency settings. Introduction to the basic educational, historical, philosophical foundations of counseling as well as specific traits and skills of counselors. The course is also designed to provide beginning level concepts and skills required for certification and licensure. Prerequisite: Must be taken first year in program.

CNED5213 Lifestyle & Career Development (Su) Theories of career development and counseling, including the use of occupational information sources and career assessment tools and techniques. Prerequisite: CNED 5333 (preferred)

CNED5303 Individual Appraisal (Fa) Analysis of concepts, methods, and procedures utilized in individual appraisal.

CNED5313 Program Organization and Information Management (Fa) Study of client information needs and strategies for effective management of counseling services.

CNED5323 Counseling Theory (Su, Fa) Introductory survey and critical analysis of major alternative theoretical perspectives in counseling.

CNED5333 Basic Counseling Techniques (Fa, Sp) Introduction to basic counseling techniques and skills common to multiple theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: CNED masters student or instructor Permission.

CNED5343 Counseling Practicum (Sp, Fa) Supervised counseling practice. Pre or Co requisite: CEND 5303 and CNED 5363 and CNED 5373. Prerequisite: CNED 5203, CNED 5323, CNED 5333, CNED 5403. CNED faculty consent required.

CNED5353 Psychopharmacology (Su) Study of theory, research, & practice issues pertaining to psychopharmacology for non-medical practitioners. Prerequisite: CNED 5203, CNED 5323, CNED 5333.

CNED5363 Dynamics of Group Counseling (Sp, Fa) Therapeutic and other theoretical information is presented regarding group process and the counselor's role in that process. An experiential group experience is required. Prerequisite: CNED 5333 and CNED 5323.

CNED5373 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling (Fa) (Formerly CNED 5372) Review of ethical and legal standards governing professional counselor training, research, and counseling practice; including client rights; confidentiality; the client-counselor relationship; and counseling research, training, and supervision. Prerequisite: CNED 5103 and CNED 5203.

CNED5383 Crisis Intervention Counseling (Su) (Formerly CNED 5382) Analysis and application of short-term counseling intervention strategies in crisis situations, with special attention to incidents involving rape, physical, or emotional abuse, divorce, suicidal depression, grief, martial or family instability, and violent conflict. Prerequisite: CNED 5333 (preferred).

CNED5403 Case Management and Counseling (Fa) Procedures in case management utilizing both clinical and interview data in assisting children, adolescents, and adults in educational, vocational, personal, and social planning. Prerequisite: CNED 5303 and CNED 5323 and CNED 5333.

CNED5513 Counseling and Human Diversity (Su) Examination of human and cultural diversity, emphasizing issues of race, class, and socioeconomic status, and how they impact our clients as individuals and as family and society members.

CNED574V Counseling Internship (Sp, Fa) (1-3) A 600-clock-hour field placement in an approved setting over a minimum of two continuous semesters. Co or Prerequisite CNED 5213. Prerequisite: CNED 5203, CNED 5303, CNED 5323, CNED 5333, CNED 5343, CNED 5363, CNED 5373, CNED 5403, CNED 5513 and CNED 6203. CNED Faculty consent required. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CNED599V Seminar (Irregular) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CNED6003 Counseling and Addictions (Su) A study of behavioral and substance additions, including an overview of differential treatment. Prerequisite: CNED 5323 and CNED 5333 and CNED doctoral or masters standing or permission.

CNED600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

CNED6013 Advanced Counseling Theory and Methods (Even years, Sp) Critical analysis of major theoretical perspectives in counseling, including both group and individual counseling strategies for dealing with affective, cognitive, and behavioral dysfunction. Prerequisite: CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6023 Foundations of Marriage and Family Counseling Therapy (Su) Comprehensive exploration of the current theories/techniques of marriage, family and couples counseling. Prerequisite: CNED 5323 and CNED 5333 and CNED doctoral or masters standing or permission.

CNED6033 Advanced Group Theory and Methods (Odd years, Sp) Comparative study of theories and processes of group counseling. Includes supervised experience in group facilitation with video recording and playback. Prerequisite: CNED 5363 or equivalent and CNED doctoral or masters standing or permission.

CNED6043 Supervision of Counselors (Even years, Fa) Analysis, assessment, and practical application of counselor supervision techniques in treatment and training programs. Prerequisite: CNED doctoral standing and CNED faculty consent.

CNED605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

CNED6063 Counseling and Sexuality (Even years, Fa) Analysis of theory and practice in issues related to sexual dysphoria, sexuality, and sexual problems. Prerequisite: CNED 574 and CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6073 Research in Counseling (Odd years, Sp) Review and analysis of research in counseling. Prerequisite: CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6083 Consultation Theory and Methods (Su) Strategies, practical application, and techniques for effective consultation with parents, teachers, and community agencies. Prerequisite: CNED 5333 (preferred) CNED doctoral or masters standing or permission.

CNED6093 Counseling Children and Adolescents (Sp) Introduction to counseling children and adolescents including the process, theories, techniques, and materials applicable to children and adolescents in a pluralistic society. Prerequisite: CNED 5323 and CNED 5333 and CNED doctoral or masters standing or permission.

CNED6123 Clinical Applications of Marriage and Family Counseling and Therapy (Odd years, Fa) Advanced clinical methodology appropriate for family counseling, marriage counseling, and couples counseling( in all settings), with emphasis on solution-focused systems, Satir model and psychoeducational family work in schools. Includes supervision of clinical experience in marriage, family and couples counseling, video recording and school/community outreach. Prerequisite: CNED 6203 and CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6413 Advanced Individual Appraisal (Odd years, Fa) To provide advanced knowledge and experience with those psychoeducational instruments and procedures used in conducting school related assessment. Prerequisite: CNED 5303 and CNED 5413 or equivalent and CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6523 Gender Issues in Counseling and Human Development (Even years, Sp) A study of gender and sex role issues pertinent to the counseling profession, and their effect on the development of children, adults, and young and older adults. Students utilize Gender Fair Guidelines for counseling as presented by the American Counseling Association. Prerequisite: CNED 5203 and CNED doctoral standing or permission.

CNED6711 Advanced Counseling Practicum (Sp) Supervised counseling practice. A 100-clock hour approved practical counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNED doctoral standing. Permission of CNED faculty and Clinical Coordinator. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CNED674V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Supervised field placement (Clinical/Instructorship/Supervision/Research). Prerequisite: CNED doctoral standing, CNED faculty consent and CNED Clinical Coordinator consent. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

CNED699V Seminar (Su) (1-18) Prerequisite: CNED Doctoral standing or permission. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

CNED700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy and consent.

(COMM) Communication

COMM1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Film Lecture (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to film as entertainment and art. How to look at film through a study of composition, lighting, editing, sound and acting. Lectures and viewing time.

COMM1003H Honors Basic Course in the Arts: Film Lecture (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction of film as entertainment and art. How to look at a film through a study of composition, lighting, editing, sound and acting. Lectures and viewing time.

COMM1313 Fundamentals of Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Interpersonal and public communication with emphasis in developing both listening and speaking skills.

COMM1313H Honors Fundamentals of Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Interpersonal and public communication with emphasis in developing both listening and speaking skills.

COMM2303 Public Speaking (Sp, Su, Fa) Continuing study of the invention and adaptation or oral discourse to the needs of listeners. Consideration of the problems of communication in platform presentation. Prerequisite: COMM 1313.

COMM2323 Interpersonal Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Personal and interpersonal factors affecting communication in everyday life. Emphasis upon ways in which interpersonal perception, physical environment, semantic choices, and nonverbal cues affect communication primarily in the context of work, family, and other personal experiences.

COMM2333 Introduction to Communication Research (Sp, Fa) Introduction to the basic assumptions underlying communication inquiry; resources for and methods of data collection in communication research; and techniques for organization, interpretation, reporting, and evaluation of communication research.

COMM2351 Parliamentary Procedure (Irregular) Study and practice of the rules and procedures by which self-governing organizations transact business. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COMM2373 Introduction to Debate (Fa) An introduction to the basic principles and procedures of debate as an instrument of critical choice and decision.

COMM2382 Intercollegiate Forensics (Irregular) Preparation and participation in public debates and other forensic activities. No more than 6 hours of credit in COMM 2382 and 3282 may be applied toward the departmental requirement. (A maximum of 12 hours in COMM 2382 and 3282 hours of credit.) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

COMM2813 Introduction to Electronic Media (Fa) Introduction to the industries centered around electronic media, including radio, broadcast and cable television, telephony, computer information systems, and digital media. Emphasis on the historical development, organizational patterns, and cultural functions of the media.

COMM298V Topics in Communication (Irregular) (1-3) Topics in communication not represented in other lower division courses.

COMM3143 Language and Expressive Culture This course explores the complex interrelationship of language, culture, and social identity. Verbal art and expressive culture are examined from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Topics include ethnographies of speaking, discourse analysis, cultural performances, and the performative aspects of oral expression. (Same as ANTH 3143,ENGL 3143)

COMM3173 Introduction to Linguistics (Irregular) Introduction to language study with stress upon modern linguistic theory and analysis. Data drawn from various languages reveal linguistic universals as well as phonological, syntactic, and semantic systems of individual languages. Related topics: language history, dialectology, language and its relation to culture and society, and the history of linguistic scholarship. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3173,ENGL 3173,WLLC 3173)

COMM3282 Advanced Forensics (Irregular) A continuation of 2382. No more than 6 hours of credit in COMM 2382 and 3282 may be applied to the departmental requirement. (A maximum of 12 hours in COMM 2382 and 3282 may be counted toward the B.A. requirements.) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

COMM3303 Small-Group Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Procedures used in exchanging information, solving problems, determining policies, and resolving differences in committees and other small groups. Prerequisite: COMM 1313 and junior standing.

COMM3333 Communication Criticism (Irregular) Basic elements and theoretical perspectives on criticism of public communication. Extensive practice in written analysis of events in public address, film, television, and other mass media.

COMM3343 Contemporary Communication Theory (Sp) Study of the nature of the communication process as it is reflected in the individual, in interpersonal settings, in one-to-many situations, and in the mass media.

COMM3353 Argumentation: Reason in Communication (Fa) Concepts characterizing rational discourse, with a concern for examining validity and fallacy. Consider traditional and contemporary models for analyzing argument, including an examination of the philosophy of argument and a practical inquiry into the uses of argument in contemporary rhetorical discourse.

COMM3363 Nonverbal Communication (Sp) Creates an understanding of the functions of nonverbal cues operating in human communication processes and develops familiarity with recent research in the field of nonverbal communication.

COMM3383 Persuasion (Fa) Introduction to theories of persuasion with emphasis on application and effect.

COMM3423 Science Fiction Film (Irregular) This class concentrates on how science fiction in various communication media influences and is, in turn, influenced by broad features of cultural life. The class considers the impact of science fiction on science fact, the military, space travel, religion, race, gender, social class, education, politics, technology, and fashion styles.

COMM3433 Family Communication (Irregular) Study of the nature, functions, and management of communication patterns in the family. Focus is on understanding routine interpersonal interactions, conflict patterns, authority structures, and decision-making processes within the context of the contemporary family.

COMM3443 Introduction to Rhetorical Theory (Sp, Fa) Interpretive-critical study of rhetoric in public contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 1313.

COMM3503 Popular Communication and Culture (Even years, Sp) This course is an introduction to basic theories and topics of Popular Communication and Culture studies. The course will emphasize understanding popular media communication forms.

COMM3673 Mediated Communication (Sp, Fa) Focuses on media messages and their social/cultural effects. Includes a critical examination of media institutions and the ways they vie for audiences. Other topics include the ways people construct meaning from messages, media's influence on attitudes, media's role in cultural life, and audiences as critical consumers of media.

COMM3703 Organizational Communication (Sp, Fa) An introduction to the theory, processes, and management of communication in organizations, with opportunities for simulated application.

COMM3883 Rhetoric of Social Movements (Fa) Study of the functions of rhetoric as it appears in the context of social movements such as American independence, women's equality, civil rights, populism, and new conservatism.

COMM3923H Honors Colloquium (Sp, Su, Fa) Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in communication).

COMM3983 Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) Communication topics which are not usually presented in depth in regular courses.

COMM399VH Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

COMM4113 Legal Communication (Fa) Examines communication processes in the legal environment and focuses on communication skills and behaviors among judges, attorneys, litigants, and jurors. Particular attention will be given to verbal strategies and nonverbal messages related to interviews, negotiation, mediation, and litigation and to the rhetorical functions of legal pleadings and judicial opinions.

COMM4143 American Film Survey (Fa) A survey of major American film genres, major directors and films that have influenced the development of motion pictures. (Same as ENGL 4143)

COMM4283 Communication in Contemporary Society (Fa) An examination of research and theory on the process and effects of communication in modern society.

COMM4313 Language and Society of Japan (Fa) The primary objective of this course is to investigate the way the Japanese language reflects the beliefs and customs of the Japanese people as a social group. For comparison purposes, this course makes reference to studies in American language and culture. Proficiency in Japanese not required. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMM4323 Communication and Conflict (Fa) Study of the processes, effects, and managements of communicative conflict, including a consideration of conflict styles, power, goals, tactics, assessment, self-intervention and third-party intervention. Prerequisite: COMM 1313 and junior standing.

COMM4333 Communication and Gender (Sp) Study of the nature, construction, functions, and effects of gender and gender-role stereotypes related to verbal and nonverbal communication, small-group and organizational interaction, and mass medicated images in contemporary culture.

COMM4343 Intercultural Communication (Fa) Study of intercultural communication skills, intercultural issues and their impact at home and abroad, and cross-cultural comparisons of communication phenomena from a variety of theoretical perspectives.

COMM4353 American Public Address (Irregular) Historical and critical study of the leading American speakers, their speeches, the issues with which they were identified. Lectures, discussion, reports, and critical papers. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMM4373 Political Communication (Even years, Sp) Study of the nature and function of the communication process as it operates in the political environment. (Same as PLSC 4373)

COMM4383 Rhetoric of the Modern American Presidency (Irregular) A study of the increasing reliance of contemporary presidents on public persuasion through rhetorical discourse.

COMM4393 Freedom of Speech: Cases & Issues (Fa) Study of philosophy, cases, and issues relevant to the first amendment right to the free expression, with focus on issues relevant to internal security, obscenity, pornography, slander, and the regulation of communication.

COMM4413 Communication, Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict (Irregular) Examines Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) research and techniques focusing primarily on negotiation and mediation. Supplements and extends material presented in COMM 4323 (Communication and Conflict). Explores the verbal and nonverbal messages occurring during negotiation and mediation situations in business, legal, and counseling environments. Prepares students for roles involving negotiation and mediation.

COMM4623 Relational Communication (Sp) Review of the major theories and concepts in a relational approach to interpersonal communication. Provides exposure to a sampling of the research findings in relational communication.

COMM4633 History and Development of International Film (Irregular) A critical survey of international film as a distinctive art form and as a medium of expression and communication with attention given to films and cinema from its origins to the present.

COMM4643 Environmental Communication (Irregular) Explores how communication is used by individuals, corporations, and governments to shape public debates about environmental issues. Topics include rhetorical strategies, the publics' right to information and input, dispute resolution techniques, advocacy campaigns, and green marketing.

COMM4683 Documentary Film (Fa) A study and analysis of the documentary film as a discrete film form and as an important contribution to the international cinematic scene. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

COMM4793 Directing Forensics (Irregular) Planning, directing, and coaching co-curricular forensics at the high school or college or both.

COMM4823 Children and Media (Sp) An in-depth examination of children's use of media and the effects of media content on child and adolescent development. Topics may include violence and sex in media, commercialism, and new media.

COMM4843 Computer-Mediated Communication (Fa) Provides an in depth consideration of the nature of computer-mediated communication by examining its use and effects in interpersonal, work, educational, and societal contexts and in an introduction to the technologies and skills required for navigating the Internet. The course focuses on the social aspects of computer-mediated communication, rather than specific software or hardware technologies.

COMM4853 Telecommunication Policy (Irregular) Research and discussion of social, ethical, education, cultural, and technological aspects of telecommunications with attention given to changing programming patterns, world systems of broadcasting, data transmission, emerging technology, international politics, and regulatory policies. Prerequisite: Junior or senior or graduate standing.

COMM4863 Seminar in Media (Irregular) Research/discussion of contemporary issues in media. Emphasis on the economic and social impact of advertising, news, censorship, programs directed toward children, portrayals of women and minorities, future trends in media technologies, and analysis of the changing media landscape.

COMM4883 Television and American Culture (Fa) Historical and critical study of how television shapes American culture and is shaped by it. Attention will be given to the study of television history, programs and audiences; particularly how race and gender shape content and reception of programming. Prerequisite: COMM 2333.

COMM490V Special Problems (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Credit arranged. Prerequisite: Advanced standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

COMM4913 Internship in Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Internship in applied communication within public and private organizations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and completion of 18 hours in communication courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

COMM5111 Colloquium in Communication Research (Sp, Fa) Presentation, evaluation, and discussion of research proposals or on-going research projects. Graduate students are required to register for this course each semester of residence.

COMM5113 Historical and Legal Methods in Communication (Fa) Emphasizes the assumptions and procedures of historical and legal research methods in communication. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

COMM5123 Quantitative Research Methods in Communication (Fa) Emphasizes the assumptions and procedures of social scientific research methods in communication.

COMM5133 Media Processes & Effects (Fa) Introduction to scholarly research and theory in media processes and effects. Particular attention will be devoted to the impact of media messages on individuals and societies. Emphasis will be placed on the construction and development of theory.

COMM5143 Ethnographic Methods in Communication (Fa) This class focuses upon the fieldwork procedures and narrative writing strategies that comprise the methods of ethnographic research in communication. Students conduct fieldwork requiring in-depth interpersonal contact with members of a group or culture, and practice narrative writing skills.

COMM5193 Seminar in Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Research, discussion, and papers focus on one of a variety of communication topics including symbolic processes in communication, philosophy of rhetoric, communication education, criticism of contemporary communication, interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and contemporary applications of rhetoric. Maximum credit is 9 semester hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

COMM5323 Seminar in Persuasion (Fa) Focus is on comparing theoretical accounts of persuasion and research evidence concerning the effects of various factors on persuasion.

COMM5333 Communication Theory (Fa) Survey of the theoretical orientations in communication theory with primary focus on conceptual, theoretical, and philosophical issues.

COMM5343 Interpersonal Communication (Fa) Theory and research concerning the exchange of information and the mutual influencing of behavior among people. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5353 Rhetorical Criticism (Sp) A seminar in rhetorical criticism. A study of the development of standards of rhetorical appraisal from the foundations of the art of speaking to the modern period; examination of contemporary approaches to rhetorical appraisal and practice in critical analysis of contemporary address.

COMM5363 Seminar in Small Group Communication (Su) A consideration of recent developments in small group research which relate to problem solving tasks, leadership and other kinds of human interaction through speech communication. Emphasis given to the interpersonal speech transaction and to the emergence of participant roles. Prerequisite: COMM 3303 or SOCI 4193.

COMM5373 Content Analysis (Irregular) Techniques for observing and analyzing the overt communication behavior of selected communicators. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5383 Seminar in Political Communication (Irregular) Research seminar focusing on selected topics such as candidate imagery, diffusion of political information, or political symbolism. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as PLSC 5383)

COMM5393 Seminar in Contemporary Rhetoric (Irregular) Systematic study of contemporary perspectives on rhetoric including scholars such as Burke, Richards, Weaver, Grassi, MacIntyre, Derrida, and Rorty. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5403 Organizational Communication Theory (Sp) A seminar on the historical development of theory and research into communication processes occurring within an organizational setting. Lecture, discussion, oral and written reports. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5413 Organizational Communication Research (Su) A seminar on conducting applied research within an organizational setting. Prerequisite: COMM 5403 and graduate standing.

COMM5423 Seminar in Mass Media Cognition (Even years, Sp) Seminar exploring how people learn from written, aural and visual mass media messages. Topics to include attention, memory, comprehension, emotional response, arousal, unconscious processing, picture perception and person perception. Seminar will be concerned with most popular media (e.g., television radio, newspaper, and film), and with several content genres (e.g., entertainment, news, advertising).

COMM5433 Marital Communication (Even years, Sp) An exploration of the major theories and lines of research that examine marital communication in contemporary American life.

COMM5443 Issues of Race and Gender in Interpersonal Communication (Odd years, Sp) An exploration of the major theories and lines of research that examine how race and gender influence interpersonal communication in everyday life in America.

COMM5453 Myth and Communication Criticism (Irregular) Seminar in major theories of mythology, including archetypal and ideological perspectives, and their applications to the criticism of public communicative events. Practice in written critical analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5503 Communication and Cultural Studies (Fa) Examinations of the role of communication in modern culture. Emphasis is upon the production and circulation of meanings with society, and special attention is given to the role of popular and mass media in this process. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5533 Family Communication (Even years, Fa) An exploration of the major theories and lines of research that examine family communication in contemporary American life.

COMM569V Seminar in Film Studies (Irregular) (1-3) Research, discussion; papers on a variety of film genres and areas including the new American film, the science-fiction film, directors, film comedy, the experimental film, criticism, and the film musical. (Same as ENGL 569V)

COMM590V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Credit by arrangement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM5913 Internship in Communication (Sp, Su, Fa) Internship in applied communication within public and private organizations. Prerequisite: 15 hours graduate level communication in residence.

COMM5993 Readings In Cultural Studies (Irregular) Classic and current theoretical approaches to cultural studies. Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise.

COMM600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(CSCE) Computer Science/Computer Engineering

CSCE1013 Explorations in Computing (Fa) An introduction to computers and computing through interactive programming. This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore programming through interactive applications such as robotics, Web applications, and multimedia. Students will learn the basics of programming, i.e., loops, conditionals, and functions, and learn about how computers work by developing their own multimedia programs, controlling their own robots, and/or creating their own interactive Web pages.

CSCE2004 Programming Foundations I (Sp, Fa) Introductory programming course for students majoring in computer science or computer engineering. Software development process: problem specification, program design, implementation, testing and documentation. Programming topics: data representation, conditional and iterative statements, functions, arrays and records. Using C++ in a UNIX environment.

CSCE2004H Honors Programming Foundations I (Sp, Fa) Introductory programming course for students majoring in computer science or computer engineering. Software development process: problem specification, program design, implementation, testing and documentation. Programming topics: data representation, conditional and iterative statements, functions, arrays and records. Using C++ in a UNIX environment.

CSCE2014 Programming Foundations II (Sp, Fa) This course continues developing problem solving techniques by focusing on fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. Topics include: abstract data types, introduction to object-oriented programming, linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, graphs, recursion, and searching and sorting algorithms. Using C++ in a UNIX environment. Prerequisite: CSCE 2004.

CSCE2014H Honors Programming Foundations II (Irregular) This course continues developing problem solving techniques by focusing on fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. Topics include: abstract data types, introduction to object-oriented programming, linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, graphs, recursion, and searching and sorting algorithms. Using C++ in a UNIX environment. Prerequisite: CSCE 2004.

CSCE2114 Digital Design (Fa) Introduction to the hardware aspects of digital computers, logic gates, flip-flops, reduction, finite state machines, sequential logic design, digital systems, software design tools, hardware description language (VHDL), and implementation technologies. (Same as ELEG 2904)

CSCE2214 Computer Organization (Fa) Presents the relationship between computing hardware and software with a focus on the concepts for current computers. CPU design topics are covered including various techniques for microprocessor design and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: CSCE 2114.

CSCE2813 Introduction to Internet/World Wide Web (Irregular) Introduction to Internet and World Wide Web tools and resources, including Web browsers, robots and search engines, multimedia authoring systems, electronic publishing systems, virtual reality systems, network compatible CD-ROMs, network telecommunication and security systems, digital watermarking, Web censors, internet authoring and programming languages.

CSCE3143 Data Structures (Fa) Applications of the elements of data structures, arrays, linked lists, trees, stacks, and search techniques. Prerequisite: MATH 2103 and CSCE 2013.

CSCE3143H Honors Data Structures (Irregular) Applications of the elements of data structures, arrays, linked lists, trees, stacks, and search techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 2103 and CSCE 2013.

CSCE3193 Programming Paradigms (Fa) Programming in different paradigms with emphasis on object oriented programming, network programming and functional programming. Survey of programming languages, event driven programming, concurrency, software validation. Prerequisite: CSCE 2014.

CSCE3313 Algorithms (Sp) Provides an introduction to formal techniques for analyzing the complexity of algorithms. The course surveys important classes of algorithms used in computer science and engineering. Prerequisite: CSCE 2014 and MATH 2103.

CSCE3413 Internet Programming (Irregular) HTML authoring to W3C standards, use of environment and SSI variables, programming concepts with both scripting languages and interpreted and compiled languages, creating web documents, applications, advanced form applications, search/index utilities, and Web databases. Course presumes some introduction to scripting or programming. Prerequisite: CSCE 2813.

CSCE3513 Software Engineering (Sp) A modern approach to the current techniques used in software design and development. This course emphasizes the use of modern software development tools, multi-module programming, and team design and engineering. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE3613 Operating Systems (Sp) An introduction to operating systems including topics in system structures, process management, storage management, files, distributed systems, and case studies. Prerequisite: CSCE 2213 and CSCE 3143.

CSCE3943 Unix Programming I (Irregular) Structure of UNIX file system, use of exec and fork, interprocess communication and record locking. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE3953 System Synthesis and Modeling (Fa) This course instructs the students in the use of modern synthesis and modeling languages and approaches for design automation. This course will teach students the use of HDLs and modeling languages for representing and implementing digital computer systems. Prerequisite: CSCE 2124.

CSCE3963 Perl Programming (Irregular) In-depth coverage of the methods and techniques of object-oriented design and its applications to database and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: CSCE 3943.

CSCE3973 UNIX Programming II (Irregular) Structure, implementation, and application of minicomputer systems, microcomputer hardware, microprogramming, minicomputer software technology, and design and evaluation of minicomputer systems. Prerequisite: CSCE 3943.

CSCE4013 Special Topics (Irregular) Consideration of computer science topics not covered in other courses. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CSCE4023H Honors Special Topics (Irregular) Consideration of current computer engineering honors topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Honors standing.

CSCE4114 Embedded Systems (Fa) The architecture, software, and hardware of embedded systems. Involves a mixture of hardware and software for the control of a system (including electrical, electro-mechanical, and electro-chemical systems). They are found in a variety of products including cars, VCRs, HDTVs, cell phones, pacemakers, spacecraft, missile systems, and robots for factory automation. Prerequisite: CSCE 2214.

CSCE4114H Honors Embedded Systems (Fa) The architecture, software, and hardware of embedded systems. Involves a mixture of hardware and software for the control of a system (including electrical, electro-mechanical, and electro-chemical systems). They are found in a variety of products including cars, VCRs, HDTVs, cell phones, pacemakers, spacecraft, missile systems, and robots for factory automation. Prerequisite: CSCE 2214.

CSCE4213 Computer Architecture (Sp) The architecture of modern scalar and parallel computing systems. Techniques for dynamic instruction scheduling, branch prediction, instruction level parallelism, shared and distributed memory multiprocessor systems, array processors, and memory hierarchies. Prerequisite: CSCE 2214. (Same as ELEG 4983)

CSCE4213H Honors Computer Architecture (Sp) The architecture of modern scalar and parallel computing systems. Techniques for dynamic instruction scheduling, branch prediction, instruction level parallelism, shared and distributed memory multiprocessor systems, array processors, and memory hierarchies. Prerequisite: CSCE 2214. (Same as CSCE 4213,ELEG 4983)

CSCE4233 Low Power Digital Systems (Irregular) The reduction of power consumption is rapidly becoming one of the key issues in digital system design. Traditionally, digital system design has mainly focused on performance and area trade-offs. This course will provide a thorough introduction to digital design for lower consumption at the circuit, logic, and architectural level. Prerequisite: CSCE 2123.

CSCE4253 Concurrent Computing (Irregular) Programming concurrent processes; computer interconnection network topologies; loosely coupled and tightly coupled paralleled computer architectures; designing algorithms for concurrency; distributed computer architectures. Prerequisite: senior standing in computer science or engineering.

CSCE4313 Programming Languages (Irregular) Comparison of imperative, object-oriented, and functional styles of languages; language extensibility, design of language interpreters, lexical analysis, grammars/parsing, and evaluation strategies. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE4323 Formal Languages and Computability (Sp) Finite Automata and regular languages, regular expressions, context-free languages and pushdown automata, nondeterminism, grammars, and Turing machines. Church's thesis, halting problem, and undecidability. Prerequisite: CSCE 3313.

CSCE4333 Introduction to Integrated Circuit Design (Irregular) Design and layout of large scale digital integrated circuits using CMOS technology. Topics include MOS devices and basic circuits, integrated circuit layout and fabrication, dynamic logic, circuit design and layout strategies for large scale CMOS circuits, estimation and optimization of logic speed. Prerequisite: ELEG 3933. (Same as ELEG 4233)

CSCE4353 CPLD/FPGA-Based System Design (Irregular) Field Programmable Logic devices (FPGAs/CPLDs) have become extremely popular as basic building blocks for digital systems. They offer a general architecture that users can customize by inducing permanent or reversible physical changes. This course will deal with the implementation of logic options using these devices. Prerequisite: CSCE 2123. (Same as ELEG 4963)

CSCE4353H Honors CPLD/FPGA-Based System Design (Irregular) Field Programmable Logic devices (FPGAs/CPLDs) have become extremely popular as basic building blocks for digital systems. They offer a general architecture that users can customize by inducing permanent or reversible physical changes. This course will deal with the implementation of logic options using these devices. Prerequisite: CSCE 2123 and Honors standing.

CSCE4423 Computer Systems Modeling (Irregular) Basic concepts of problem analysis, model design, and simulation experiments. A simulation will be introduced and used in this course. Prerequisite: INEG 3313 or STAT 3013 and proficiency in a programming language.

CSCE4523 Database Management Systems (Fa) Introduction to database management systems, architecture, storage structures, indexing, relational data model, E-R diagrams, query languages, SQL, ODBC, transaction management, integrity, and security. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE4543 Software Architecture (Irregular) A study of software architecture through the use of case studies drawn from real systems designed to solve real problems from technical as well as managerial perspectives. Techniques for designing, building, and evaluating software architectures. Prerequisite: CSCE 3313 and CSCE 4513.

CSCE4561 Capstone I (Sp, Fa) CSCE students complete a comprehensive software capstone project during their final year of undergraduate studies. The project is done over 2 semesters in phases: concept, formal proposal, implementation, and presentation. The projects include and may require the integration of software and human factors and hardware elements and are developed to software engineering methodologies.

CSCE4613 Artificial Intelligence (Irregular) Introduction to intelligent agents, AI languages, search, first order logic, knowledge representation, ontologies, problem solving, natural language processing, machine vision, machine learning, and robotics. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE4753 Computer Networks (Sp) This course is an introductory course on computer networks. Using the Internet as a vehicle, this course introduces underlying concepts and principles of modern computer networks, with emphasis on protocols, architectures, and implementation issues. Prerequisite: INEG 3313 or STAT 3013.

CSCE4813 Computer Graphics (Irregular) Introduction to the theory and algorithms used in computer graphics systems and applications. Topics include: 2D and 3D geometric models (points, lines, polygons, surfaces), affine transformations (rotation, translation, scaling), viewpoint calculation (clipping, projection), lighting models (light-material interactions, illumination and shadow calculation). Students will implement their own graphics pipeline to demonstrate many of these techniques. Higher level computer graphics applications will be created using OpenGL. Prerequisite: CSCE 3143.

CSCE490V Individual Study (Irregular) (1-3) Individual study directed by faculty in current research topics, state of the art, or advanced methodology in one of the major computer science or computer engineering areas.

CSCE4912H Honors Thesis (Sp, Fa) To provide honors students with experience in presenting their research accomplishments to their peers and faculty. Prerequisite: Honors standing. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

CSCE4914 Advanced Digital Design (Sp) To master advanced logic design concepts, including the design and testing of synchronous and asynchronous combinational and sequential circuits using state of the art CAD tools. Prerequisite: CSCE 2114 or ELEG 2904. (Same as ELEG 4914)

CSCE4963 Capstone II (Sp, Fa) CSCE students complete a comprehensive capstone project during their final year of undergraduate studies. The project is done over 2 semesters in phases: concepts, formal proposal, implementation, and presentation. The projects include and may require the integration of software and human factor, hardware elements and are developed to software engineering methodologies. Prerequisite: CSCE 4561.

CSCE5003 Advanced Programming Languages (Irregular) Abstraction, proof of correctness, functional languages, concurrent programming, exception handling, dataflow and object oriented programming, denotational semantics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE5013 Advanced Special Topics in Computer Science (Irregular) Consideration of current computer engineering topics not covered in other courses. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

CSCE5033 Advanced Algorithms (Irregular) Design of computer algorithms, with primary emphasis on the development of efficient implementation.

CSCE5043 Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Irregular) In-depth introduction to AI. Topics include: philosophical foundations, cognition, intelligent agents, AI languages, search, genetic algorithms, first order and modal logic, inference, resolution, knowledge representation, ontologies, problem solving, planning, expert systems, uncertainty, probabilistic reasoning, fuzzy logic, machine learning, natural language processing, machine vision, and robotics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE5093 Fault-Tolerant System Design (Irregular) Fault-tolerance is concerned with making or recovering from the effects of faults in a digital system, once they have been detected. On-line fault detection is often required before the fault recovery process. This course will familiarize students with currently available techniques for self-checking and fault-tolerant digital system design.

CSCE5203 Advanced Database Systems (Irregular) Topics include: object databases, distributed databases, XML query, data warehouses, network as database systems, peer-peer data sharing architectures, data grids, data mining, logic foundations, semantic databases, spatial and temporal databases, and knowledge bases. Prerequisite: CSCE 5123 and graduate standing.

CSCE5213 Bioinformatics (Irregular) Application of algorithmic techniques to the analysis and solution of biological problems. Topics include an introduction to molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology, biological sequence comparison, and phylogenetics, as well as topics of current interest. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (Same as BENG 5213)

CSCE5243 Advanced Formal Languages (Irregular) An advanced continuation of CSCE 4323. Prerequisite: CSCE 4323 and graduate standing.

CSCE5253L Integrated Circuit Design Laboratory I (Irregular) Design and layout of large scale digital integrated circuits. Students design, check and simulate digital integrated circuits which will be fabricated, and tested in I.C. Design Laboratory II. Topics include computer aided design, circuit timing, and wire delay. Prerequisite: CSCE 4333.

CSCE5263 Computational Complexity (Irregular) Turing machines, recursion theory and computability, complexity measures, NP-completeness, analysis on NP-complete problems, pseudo-polynomial and approximation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE5283 Graph and Combinatorial Algorithms (Irregular) A study of algorithms for graphs and combinatorics with special attention to computer implementation and runtime efficiency. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor consent.

CSCE5313 Advanced Operating Systems (Irregular) Concurrent processes and process communication; mutual exclusion and synchronization principles; kernel philosophy; resource allocation and deadlock; and case studies of specific operating systems. Prerequisite: CSCE 4413 or equivalent and graduate standing.

CSCE5323 Computer Security (Irregular) Study of a broad selection of contemporary issues in computer security. Topics include access control, security policies, authentication methods, secure system design, and information assurance. Prerequisite: CSCE 4413.

CSCE5333 Computer Forensics (Irregular) Various methods for identification, preservation, and extraction of electronic evidence at a computer crime scene. Specific topics include auditing and investigation of network and host intrusions, computer forensics tools, resources for system administrators and information security officers, legal issues related to computer and network forensics. Prerequisite: CSCE 5323.

CSCE5363L Integrated Circuit Design Laboratory II (Irregular) Students test the I.C. chips they designed in I.C. Design Laboratory I, and propose design corrections where needed. Topics include bipolar chip design, gate arrays, BICMOS, memory design, design for testability, and dynamic & domino logic. Prerequisite: CSCE 5253.

CSCE5613 Telecommunications (Irregular) Overview of public and private telecommunication systems, traffic engineering, communications systems basics, information technology, electromagnetics, and data transmission. (Same as ELEG 5613)

CSCE5633 Network Performance Evaluation (Irregular) A study of performance modeling tools for telecommunication networks, computer networks, and wireless networks. Prerequisite: STAT 3013.

CSCE5643 Computer Communications Networks (Irregular) A study of computer communication networks, including the data link layer, routing, flow-control, local area networks, TCP/IP, ATM, B-ISDN, queueing analysis, and recent developments in computer communications.

CSCE5653 Network Security (Irregular) This course introduces security and secrecy in a networked environment. It is intended to familiarize students with the elements of secure communication, and how they inter-relate to provide secure networks in public and private settings.

CSCE5683 Digital Image Processing (Irregular) Introduction to digital image processing with an emphasis on practical implementation techniques. Applications include: image acquisition and sampling, image enhancement, noise removal, image restoration, image compression, and object detection. Fundamental methods include: point operations, geometric transformations, linear image processing in the spatial and frequency domains, and non-linear image processing techniques. Basic techniques of linear system theory such as convolution and Fourier transforms will be introduced as necessary to support these topics.

CSCE5723 Client-Server Computing (Irregular) Advanced Object Oriented methods for designing software systems for network applications. Topics include implementations of distributed object models, remote database connectivity. Server side programming, and reusable components. Prerequisite: CSCE 5743 and graduate standing.

CSCE581V Master's Project (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Required course for report option. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE590V Advanced Individual Study (Irregular) (1-3) Advanced graduate level individual study directed by faculty in current research topics, state of the art, or advanced methodology in one of the major computer science or computer engineering areas.

CSCE5943 Computer Arithmetic Circuits (Irregular) Examination of fundamental principles of algorithms for performing arithmetic operations in computers. This course provides sufficient theoretical and practical information to prepare the digital design engineer with an awareness of basic techniques for the realization of arithmetic circuits. Pre- or Corequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE5983 Application Specific Integrated Circuit Design (Irregular) ASIC design is taught with emphasis on industrial preparation. Topics include ASIC technologies, design entry, simulation, and synthesis. Advanced design methods and techniques are studied for cell based and gate array ASICs. Prerequisite: CSCE 4213 or ELEG 4943.

CSCE610V Master's Thesis (Sp, Fa) (1-6)

CSCE620V Post-Master's Research (Sp, Fa) (1-18)

CSCE700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) May be repeated for up to 5 hours of degree credit.

(CSES) Crop, Soil & Environmental Sciences

CSES1011 Introduction to Crop, Soil, and Environmental Science (Fa)
An introduction to the CSES department and majors in Environmental Soil and Water Sciences and Crop Management. Emphasis will be placed on issues and opportunities within these disciplines and orienting students to the department and University of Arkansas. Required of all department majors with less than 24 semester credit hours. Recitation 1 hour 20 minutes per week for the first eight weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: Freshman and sophomore standing only.

CSES1203 Introduction to Plant Sciences (Sp, Fa)
An introduction to basics of agricultural crop plant structure, growth, and production. (Same as HORT 1203)

CSES2003 Introduction to Weed Science (Fa)
Fundamental, practical concepts of weed control and weed biology; equipment and techniques used in modern weed control practices; and basic recommendations and systems for specific agronomic and horticultural crops. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 2003.

CSES2012 Introduction to Organic Crop Production (Sp)
An introduction to the principles of organic agriculture and ecology and the regulations defining organic production and certification. Additional topics include crop rotations for pest management and for increasing soil organic matter, feeding the soil and plant nutrition, soil health, and green manuring, corporate agriculture and genetically modified organisms.

CSES2013 Pest Management (Sp)
Introduction to basic principles of pest management as they relate to vertebrate animals, insects, plant disease and weeds. Selected pests are studied with emphasis on current management approaches and alternative pest control.

CSES2101L Crop Science Laboratory (Sp)
A series of laboratory experiments designed to reinforce principles of plant growth and development, reproduction, classification, and the utilization of plant products. Emphasis is placed on major crop plant species. Experiments are conducted by individuals or by teams. Laboratory consists of a single, 2-hour period each week. Required for Crop Management majors. Corequisite: CSES 2103.

CSES2103 Crop Science (Sp)
Principles of crop growth, development, and utilization and how these principles relate to production. Emphasis on major agronomic crop species. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CSES2201L Soil Science Laboratory (Fa)
Field and laboratory exercises related to the study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Laboratory mandatory for all crop management and environmental, soil, and water science majors and optional for others. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CSES 2203.

CSES2203 Soil Science (Fa)
Origin, classification, and physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Lecture 3 hours, discussion 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 or CHEM 1074. (Same as ENSC 2203)

CSES3023 Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences Colloquium (Fa)
A communication-intensive course covering topics in agronomy and environmental, soil, and water science with particular emphasis on spoken communication but also including written communication, group activities, professionalism, ethics, problem solving, and information retrieval. A student-oriented class with collaborative participation. Colloquium workshop: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing only.

CSES3113 Forage Management (Even years, Sp)
Forage crops for pasture, hay, and silage with reference to growth and development, production, nutritional quality, and grazing systems. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 1203.

CSES3214 Soil Resources and Nutrient Cycles (Odd years, Sp)
Integration of the fundamental concepts of the biological, chemical, and physical properties of soil systems and their roles in managing soil resources. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

CSES3312 Cotton Production (Even years, Fa)
Principles and techniques associated with production of cotton. Recitation 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 1203.

CSES3322 Soybean Production (Odd years, Sp)
An overview of the history and utilization of soybean as well as the physiological and environmental basis for the development of economical soybean production practices. Recitation 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 1203.

CSES3332 Rice Production (Odd years, Fa)
A study of the principles and practices involved in rice culture worldwide with major emphasis on the United States. Recitation 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 1203.

CSES3342 Cereal Grain Production (Even years, Sp)
An overview of the botany, production, cultural practices, soil & climatic adaptation and utilization of the major cereal grain crops. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or CSES 2103 or HORT 1203.

CSES355V Soil Profile Description (Fa) (1-2)
Training for soil profile description writing and membership of judging teams. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

CSES400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)
Work on special problems in crop, soil and environmental sciences or related field. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

CSES4013 Advanced Crop Science (Sp)
Fundamental concepts of crop physiology, crop improvement, seed science, and crop production systems. Recitation 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 2103.

CSES402V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3)
Studies of selected topics in crop, soil and environmental sciences not available in other courses. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CSES4043 Environmental Impact and Fate of Pesticides (Fa)
Environmental issues associated with pesticide use, including fate of pesticides in the environment, ecological impact of pesticides, and exposure risks to humans. Course recommended for students who have 12 hours of biological and /or physical sciences or consent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CSES4103 Plant Breeding (Even years, Fa)
Basic principles involved in plant breeding programs to improve crop plants and seed programs. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ANSC 3123 or BIOL 2323.

CSES4133 Weed Identification, Morphology, and Ecology (Fa)
Study of weeds as economic pests occurring in both agricultural and nonagricultural situations and including poisonous plants and other specific weed problems. Gross morphological plant family characteristics which aid identification, habitat of growth and distribution, ecology, competition, and allelopathy are discussed. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours a week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2103 (or HORT 2003).

CSES4143 Principles of Weed Control (Sp)
Advanced concepts and technology used in modern weed control practices and study of the chemistry and specific activity of herbicides in current usage. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L and CSES 2003.

CSES4224 Soil Fertility (Fa)
Study of the soilís chemical, biological and physical properties, and human modification of these properties, as they influence the uptake and utilization of the essential nutrients by plants. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2201L and CSES 2203.

CSES4234 Plant Anatomy (Sp)
Advanced training in plant anatomy. Studying the structure, terminology, techniques and function associated with vascular plant anatomy. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 1613/1611 or BIOL 1543/1541L.

CSES4253 Soil Classification and Genesis (Sp)
Lecture and field evaluation of soil properties and their relation to soil genesis and soil classification with emphasis on soils of Arkansas. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

CSES462V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)
Supervised practical work experience in agronomy and environmental science to develop and demonstrate professional competence. Faculty approval of project proposal prior to enrollment and written and oral reports after the project is complete are required. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CSES4803 Precision Agriculture (Odd years, Fa)
Introduction to precision agriculture, benefits, spatial variability within a field, zone concept, site-specific management. Spatial data collection: sensors, GPS, yield monitoring, remote sensing. Knowledge discovery from data: data processing, neural networks, genetic algorithms, use of GIS. Decision support systems. Variable-rate technology: real-time and map-based systems, variable-rate machinery, and smart controls. Evaluation: yield mapping, economic analysis. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 1213 and junior standing.

CSES5001 Weed Science Practicum (Su)
Training for membership on weed team, through participation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSES5013 Crop Physiology (Odd years, Fa)
Understanding and quantitative measurement of physiological processes, plant responses, and environmental parameters in relation to the production of crops. Prerequisite: BIOL 4304.

CSES5023 Weed Physiology and Herbicide Resistance in Plants (Odd years, Fa)
The reproduction, growth, and development of weeds and the ecological factors affecting these processes; development and mechanisms of herbicide resistance, flow of herbicide-resistance genes; and development of herbicide-resistant crops. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 4143 and (BIOL 4304 or CHEM 5813).

CSES502V Special Problems Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)
Original investigations on assigned problems in agronomy. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. CSES5033 Advanced Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition (Even years, Fa) Study of water uptake, ion absorption, translocation and metabolism in higher plants. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 4304 and CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L.

CSES504V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4)
Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in agronomy. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSES5053 Scientific Writing (Fa)
Open to graduate students, especially those in agricultural and life sciences. The course will cover searching the scientific literature, writing theses, proposals, journal articles, and other scientific documents. Emphasis on style and techniques used in scientific publication. Lecture and workshop 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSES5103 Scientific Presentations (Sp)
Experience in procedures required for professional presentations of scientific papers, seminars, posters; and research findings at meetings in conferences, and with discussion groups. Instruction in organization of materials, visual aids, and good speaking habits. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSES5124 Crop Molecular and Physiological Genetics (Even years, Sp)
Study of genome organization and expression in agronomic and horticultural plants, with emphasis on genes regulating physiological processes. Lecture 3 hours, discussion 1 hour per week. CSES 5013 and CHEM 5813 and CHEM 5843 are recommended but not required. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: BIOL 4304 and BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2321L (or ANSC 3123). CSES5214 Analytical Research Techniques in

Agronomy (Even years, Fa)
Preparation and analysis of plant and soil samples utilizing spectrophotometry, isotopes, and chromatographic separation methods. Additionally, measurements are made of photosyntheses, respiration, water relationships, light, and temperatures in whole plants. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 4304 and CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L.

CSES5224 Soil Physics (Sp)
Physical properties of soils and their relation to other soil properties, growth of plants and transport of water, oxygen, heat, and solutes such as pesticides and plant nutrients. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203 and MATH 1203.

CSES5233 Plant Genetic Engineering (Odd years, Sp)
Topics will be covered in the field of in vitro plant biology, transgene genetics and crop genetic engineering. Concepts and applications of transgenic plant technology will be discussed, with the emphasis on the strategies for crop improvement and gene discovery. Lecture 3 hours.

CSES5264 Soil Microbiology (Odd years, Sp)
A study of the microorganisms in soil and the biochemical processes for which they are responsible. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2013 and BIOL 2011L.

CSES5453 Soil Chemistry (Even years, Sp)
Application of the principles of chemistry to processes of agronomic and environmental importance in soils. Soil clay mineralogy, soil solution thermodynamics, structure and reactivity of humus, surface complexation and ion exchange, electro-chemical phenomena, and colloidal stability. Prerequisite: CSES 2203 and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

CSES5543 Plant Genomics (Odd years, Fa)
Plant genetics based on the study of whole genome sequence, transcriptome and proteome. Provides an overview of the principles and techniques of experimental and in silico genomics. Covers all areas of genome research including structural, comparative and functional genomics as well as proteomics. Prerequisite: CHEM 5843 or any graduate level genetics course.

CSES600V Masterís Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSES6113 Herbicide Behavior (Even years, Fa)
Biochemistry, physiology and behavior of herbicides in plants, soils, and the environment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 4143 and BIOL 4304 and CHEM 3813.

CSES6253 Forage-Ruminant Relations (Odd years, Sp)
Advanced chemical, physical, and botanical characteristics of forage plants, the dynamics of grazing, intake and digestion, and techniques of measuring forage utilization and systems analysis at the plant-animal interface. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 3143 and CSES 3113. (Same as ANSC 6253)

CSES700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CSCE 700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)

(CVEG) Civil Engineering

CVEG2051L Surveying Systems Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Laboratory exercises demonstrating the principles and practices of surveying systems. Corequisite: CVEG 2053.

CVEG2053 Surveying Systems (Sp, Fa) Coordinate, measuring, and total integrated surveying systems; total stations, electronic data collection, and reduction; error analysis; applications to civil engineering and surveying practice. Corequisite: CVEG 2051L. Prerequisite: MATH 2554.

CVEG2113 Structural Materials (Sp, Fa) Production, properties, behavior, and structural applications of concrete, steel, timber, masonry, and plastic. Statistical analysis methods for quality control are also covered. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: MEEG 3013. Corequisite: Lab component.

CVEG3022 Public Works Economics (Sp, Fa) Continues the concepts of engineering design and the engineering approach to the solution of problems. The principles and applications of engineering economy are introduced. Creative thinking is emphasized. Recitation 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CVEG3133 Soil Mechanics (Sp, Fa) Introduction to geotechnical engineering. Properties of soils related to foundations, retaining walls, earth structures, and highways. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CVEG 3213 and MATH 3404. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 3013.

CVEG3213 Hydraulics (Sp, Fa) Study of incompressible fluids. Topics include fluid properties, fluid statics, continuity, energy and hydraulic gradients, fundamentals of flow in pipes and open channels. Hardy Cross analyses, measurement of flow of incompressible fluids, hydraulic similitude and dimensional analysis. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2003.

CVEG3223 Hydrology (Sp, Fa) Use of ground water and surface water. Flood routing procedures in storage reservoirs and channels. Hydrologic planning including storage reservoir design, frequency duration analysis, and related techniques. Prerequisite: CVEG 2053 or BENG 2612; and CVEG 3213 or MEEG 3503.

CVEG3243 Environmental Engineering (Sp, Fa) Introduction to theories and fundamentals of physical, chemical, and biological processes with emphasis on water supply and wastewater collection, transportation, and treatment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and CHEM 1123.

CVEG3304 Structural Analysis (Sp, Fa) Truss analysis, influence lines for beams and frames, and effects of moving loads. Deformation of beams, frames, and trusses. Analysis of indeterminate structures by moment area, slope deflection, and moment distribution methods; approximate methods of analysis. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 3013.

CVEG3413 Transportation Engineering (Fa) Introduction to highway and transportation engineering, planning, finance, economics, traffic, and geometric design of transportation facilities; theory and application of driver, vehicle and roadway characteristics as they relate to roadway and intersection design; safety, capacity, traffic operations, and environmental effects for highway engineering. Prerequisite: CVEG 2053.

CVEG4003 CAD & Visualization for Civil Structures (Irregular) Design process of infrastructures using 3 Dimensional (3D) Computer Aided Design and Engineering visualization with a highway design emphasis. Students produce a digital video for a designed civil structure as a class project. Develop skills in photo matching for placement of designed structures in real environment. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CVEG4053 Land Surveying (Irregular) Historical background of property surveys. Detailed consideration of original surveys and the United States Public Land Surveys. Writing adequate land descriptions. Interpretation of old descriptions. Excess and deficiency. Riparian rights. Field practice in relocation of old corners. Prerequisites: Senior standing and CVEG 2053.

CVEG4083 Control Surveys (Irregular) Sun and Polaris observations for astronomic azimuth, solar access studies; control traversing, leveling, triangulation; state plane coordinate systems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CVEG 2053 and CVEG 2051L.

CVEG4143 Foundation Engineering (Sp, Fa) Analysis and design of retaining walls, footings, sheet piles, and piles. Determination of foundation settlements in sand and clay. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133.

CVEG4153 Earth Structures (Irregular) The use of soil as a construction material including compaction, cement, lime, and fly ash stabilization. Special topics include seepage, slope stability, swelling, and collapsible soils. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133.

CVEG4243 Environmental Engineering Design (Sp, Fa) Application of physical, biological, and chemical operations and processes to the design of water supply and wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG4263 Environmental Regulations and Permits (Fa) Topics include federal and state environmental regulations, the permitting process, permit requirements and related issues. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243 and senior standing.

CVEG4303 Reinforced Concrete Design I (Sp, Fa) Design of reinforced concrete elements with emphasis on ultimate strength design supplemented by working stress design for deflection and crack analysis. Prerequisite: CVEG 2113 and CVEG 3304.

CVEG4313 Structural Steel Design I (Sp, Fa) Design of structural steel elements by elastic design the Load and Resistance Factor Design method. Intensive treatment of tension members, beams, columns, and connections. Pre- or Corequisite: CVEG 2113. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304.

CVEG4323 Design of Structural Systems (Sp) An overview of the structural design of buildings. Investigates structural design from loading identification through structural analysis and detailing including consideration of fabrication, construction and erection issues. Prerequisites: CVEG 4303 and 4313.

CVEG4343 Reinforced Masonry Design (Irregular) Properties of masonry materials and assemblages. Masonry workmanship and quality control. Design of reinforced masonry elements against gravity and lateral loads. Design of masonry connections and joints. Application to 1- and 2-story buildings. Prerequisite: CVEG 4303.

CVEG4353 Timber Design (Irregular) Selection of timber beams, columns, and beam-columns. Physical properties of wood, analysis and design of timber connections. Truss design, glulam members, timber bridge design, treatment for decay, and fire protection. Pre- or Corequisite: CVEG 2113. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304.

CVEG4363 Prestressed Concrete Design (Irregular) Analysis and design of prestressed concrete flexural sections by working stress and ultimate strength design methods. Flexural behavior, moment-curvature diagrams, draping, anchorage zone design, torsion and shear, deflections, and prestress losses. Design of composite sections and continuous beams. Prerequisite: CVEG 4303.

CVEG4393 Reinforced Concrete Design II (Irregular) Shear strength, minimum thickness requirements, and deflection calculations for reinforced concrete structural slabs. Design of one-way and two-way structural slabs by the direct design and equivalent frame methods. Prerequisite: CVEG 4303.

CVEG4413 Pavement Evaluation and Rehabilitation (Irregular) Introduction of concepts and procedures for pavement condition surveys; evaluation by nondestructive and destructive testing; maintenance strategies; rehabilitation of pavement systems for highway and airfields; pavement management systems. Prerequisite: CVEG 4433.

CVEG4423 Geometric Design (Sp) The geometric design of streets and highways, based on theory and application of driver and vehicle characteristics. Prerequisite: CVEG 3413.

CVEG4433 Transportation Pavements and Materials (Sp, Fa) Study of the engineering properties and behavior of materials commonly used in transportation facilities as they relate to the design and performance of flexible and rigid pavement systems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133, CVEG 3413, and INEG 3313.

CVEG4513 Construction Management (Sp, Fa) Introduction to methods and procedures for management of civil engineering construction projects including organization, plans and specs, cost estimating and bidding, project planning and finance, quality control/ assurance, construction safety, cost management, labor issues, change orders, and subcontractor issues. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CVEG4803 Structural Loadings (Irregular) Theoretical background to and practical code requirements for various structural loadings. These include dead loads, occupancy loads, roof loads and ponding, snow loads, granular loads, vehicular loads, wind loading, and seismic loads. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304 and CVEG 4303 (or CVEG 4313).

CVEG4811 Environmental Design Project (Sp) Comprehensive engineering design project primarily related to environmental issues. Corequisite: CVEG 4243

CVEG4821 Geotechnical Design Project (Fa) Comprehensive engineering design project primarily related to geotechnical issues. Corequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG4831 Structural Design Project (Sp) Comprehensive engineering design project primarily related to structural issues. Corequisite: CVEG 4323

CVEG4841 Transportation Design Project (Fa) Comprehensive engineering design project primarily related to transportation issues. Corequisite: CVEG 4433.

CVEG4852 Engineering Professional Practice Issues (Sp, Fa) Study of various issues related to the professional practice of engineering including ethics, professionalism, project procurement, social and political issues, project management, globalism, contract documents and other legal issues. Corequisite: CVEG 4811 or CVEG 4821 or CVEG 4831 or CVEG 4841.

CVEG488V Special Problems (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CVEG491VH Honors Studies in Geotechnical Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) The study of advanced topics in the geotechnical engineering field. May include participation in geotechnical engineering courses normally available only to graduate students. Course may be repeated for up to 6 hours total credit with approval of the CVEG honors advisor. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133.

CVEG492VH Honors Studies in Environmental Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) The study of advanced topics in the environmental engineering field. May include participation in environmental engineering courses normally available only to graduate students. Course may be repeated for up to 6 hours total credit with approval of the CVEG honors advisor. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG493VH Honors Studies in Structural Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) The study of advanced topics in the structural engineering field. May include participation in structural engineering courses normally available only to graduate students. Course may be repeated for up to 6 hours total credit with approval of the CVEG honors advisor. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304.

CVEG494VH Honors Studies in Transportation Engineering (Irregular) (1-6) The study of advanced topics in the transportation engineering field. May include participation in transportation engineering courses normally available only to graduate students. Course may be repeated for up to 6 hours total credit with approval of the CVEG honors advisor. Prerequisite: CVEG 3413.

CVEG4983H Honors Undergraduate Thesis (Irregular) Thesis research for civil engineering students enrolled in the honors college. Prerequisite: Honors College.

CVEG5113 Soil Dynamics (Irregular) This course covers propagation of stress waves in elastic and inelastic materials, dynamic loading of soils, and stiffness and damping properties of soils. Use of field and laboratory techniques to determine shear wave velocity of soils. Also includes applications of dynamic soil properties in site stiffness characterization, geotechnical earthquake engineering, evaluation of ground improvement, and design of machine foundations. Prerequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG5123 Measurement of Soil Properties (Irregular) Consideration of basic principles involved in measuring properties of soils. Detailed analysis of standard and specialized soil testing procedures and equipment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG5143 Transportation Soils Engineering (Irregular) Advanced study of the properties of surficial soils; soil classification systems; pedology; soil occurrence and variability; subgrade evaluation procedures; repeated load behavior of soils; soil compaction and field control; soil stabilization; soil trafficability and subgrade stability for transportation facilities. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133.

CVEG5163 Seepage and Consolidation (Irregular) Investigation of the flow of water through soils and the time rate of compression of soils. Characterization of the hydraulic conductivity of soils in the field, seepage through earth dams, excavation cut-off walls, and other seepage control systems. Analytical and experimental investigations of soil volume change under hydraulic and mechanical loading. Design of earth and rock dams, well pumping, and vertical and radial consolidation in embankments. Prerequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG5173 Advanced Foundations (Irregular) Study of soil-supported structures. Topics include drilled piers, slope stability, pile groups, negative skin friction, foundation design from the standard penetration test and Dutch cone, and other specialized foundation design topics. Prerequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG5183 Geo-Environmental Engineering (Irregular) Study of the geotechnical aspects of waste containment systems and contaminant remediation applications. Analysis and measurement of flow of water and contaminants through saturated and unsaturated soils, clay mineralogy and soil-chemical compatibility, and mechanical and hydraulic behavior of geomembranes, geotextiles, and geosynthetic clay liners. Design and construction aspects of compacted clay and composite landfill liners, drainage systems, and landfill covers. Prerequisite: CVEG 3133

CVEG5193 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering (Irregular) This course covers stress wave propagation in soil and rock; influence of soil conditions on seismic ground motion characteristics; evaluation of site response using wave propagation techniques; liquefaction of soils; seismic response of earth structures and slopes. Prerequisite: CVEG 4143.

CVEG5234 Water and Wastewater Analysis (Irregular) Application of chemistry to environmental engineering. Quantitative determinations of constituents in water and wastewater. Principles of bacteriological laboratory techniques. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG5243 Groundwater Hydrology (Irregular) Detailed analysis of groundwater movement, well hydraulics, groundwater pollution and artificial recharge. Surface and subsurface investigations of groundwater and groundwater management, saline intrusion and groundwater modeling will be addressed. Prerequisite: CVEG 3223.

CVEG5253 Microbiology for Environmental Engineers (Irregular) Fundamental and applied aspects of microbiology and biochemistry relating to water quality control, wastewater treatment, and stream pollution. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG5263 Stream Pollution Analysis (Irregular) The determination and application of deoxygenation and reaeration rates to stream pollution analysis. A study of biological degradation rates for municipal and industrial wastes. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG5273 Open Channel Flow (Irregular) Open Channel Flow includes advanced open channel hydraulics, flow measurement techniques, a hydrology review, culvert and storm drainage facility design, natural channel classification (fluvial geomorphology) and rehabilitation, computer methods and environmental issues. Prerequisite: CVEG 3213 and CVEG 3223.

CVEG5293 Water Treatment & Distribution System Design (Irregular) Design of industrial and municipal water treatment plants. Discussion of raw and treated water requirements for the several uses. Distribution system analysis and design including distribution storage and pumping. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243.

CVEG5313 Matrix Analysis of Structures (Irregular) Energy and digital computer techniques of structural analysis as applied to conventional forms, space trusses, and frames. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304.

CVEG5323 Structural Dynamics (Irregular) Dynamics response of single and multidegree of freedom systems. Modal analysis. Response spectra. Computer programs for dynamic analysis. Design considerations for structures subjected to time-varying forces including earthquake, wind, and blast loads. Prerequisite: CVEG 3304.

CVEG5343 Highway Bridges (Irregular) Economics of spans, current design and construction specifications, comparative designs. Possible refinements in design techniques and improved utilization of materials. Prerequisite: CVEG 4313 and CVEG 4303.

CVEG5373 Advanced Structural Steel Design (Irregular) Design of structural steel components using the Load and Resistance Factor Design method. Intensive treatment of simple and eccentric connections, composite construction, plate girders, and plastic analysis and design. Prerequisite: CVEG 4313.

CVEG5383 Finite Element Methods in Civil Engineering (Irregular) An understanding of the fundamentals of the finite element method and its application to structural configurations too complicated to be analyzed without computer applications. Application to other areas of civil engineering analysis and design such as soil mechanics, foundations, fluid flow, and flow through porous media. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CVEG5403 Advanced Reinforced Concrete II (Irregular) Design of circular and rectangular reinforced concrete tanks for fluid and granular loads. Prerequisite: CVEG 4303.

CVEG5413 Transportation and Land Development (Irregular) Study of interaction between land development and the transportation network. Application of planning, design, and operational techniques to manage land development impacts upon the transportation system, and to integrate land layout with transportation network layout. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CVEG5423 Structural Design of Pavement Systems (Irregular) An introduction to the structural design of pavement systems including: survey of current design procedures; study of rigid pavement jointing and reinforcement practices; examination of the behavioral characteristics of pavement materials and of rigid and flexible pavement systems; introduction to structural analysis theories and to pavement management concepts. Prerequisite: CVEG 4433.

CVEG5433 Traffic Engineering (Irregular) A study of both the underlying theory and the use of traffic control devices (signs, traffic signals, pavement markings), and relationships to improved traffic flow and safety, driver and vehicle characteristics, geometric design, and societal concerns. Also includes methods to collect, analyze, and use traffic data. Prerequisite: CVEG 3413 or graduate standing.

CVEG5463 Transportation Modeling (Irregular) The use of mathematical techniques and/or computer software to model significant transportation system attributes. May compare model results with actual measured traffic attributes, using existing data sources and/or collecting and analyzing field data. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CVEG5473 Transportation System Characteristics (Irregular) Introduction to traffic flow theory, including traffic stream interactions and capacity. Applications for planning, design, operations. Prerequisite: CVEG 3413 and graduate standing.

CVEG5483 Transportation Management Systems (Irregular) Six transportation management systems are explored: pavement, bridge, intermodal, public transportation, safety, and congestion. System approaches are presented. Techniques are introduced on how to optimally allocate resources. Pavement and bridge structure basics are discussed and their performance parameters are presented. Case studies are used to illustrate the interfaces among various modes of transportation. Safety and congestion problems in transportation are addressed.

CVEG562V Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Fundamental and applied research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CVEG563V Special Problems (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CVEG5734 Advanced Wastewater Process Design and Analysis (Irregular) Application of advanced techniques for the analysis of wastewater treatment facilities. Physical, chemical and biological processes for removing suspended solids, organics, nitrogen, and phosphorus. Laboratory treatability studies will be used to develop design relationships. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CVEG 5234 and CVEG 4243.

CVEG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CVEG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(DANC) Dance

DANC1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Movement and Dance (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to the nature and scope of ballet, modern dance, and ethnic-ritual-world dance forms, their potential for contributing towards multicultural literacy, and to the shaping of an American audience. Comprised of lectures, videos, and movement experiences in the form of Studio Labs.

DANC1003H Honors Basic Course in the Arts: Movement and Dance (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to the nature and scope of ballet, ethnic, and modern dance forms, their potential for contributing towards multicultural literacy, and to the shaping of an American audience. Comprised of lectures, videos, and movement experiences in the form of studio labs. Prerequisite: honors standing.

DANC1912 Beginning Modern Dance (Sp, Fa) Introduction to basic techniques with an emphasis on acquiring flexibility, strength, and coordination.

DANC1922 Beginning Modern Dance II (Sp, Su, Fa) A continuation of basic modern dance techniques from DANC 1912, with emphasis on weight, time, and shape in movement. Prerequisite: DANC 1912.

DANC1932 Beginning Ballet (Sp, Fa) Introduction to the basic techniques of ballet in the recognized classic form including barre exercises, port de bras, and center practice.

DANC1942 Beginning Ballet II (Sp, Su, Fa) A continuation of the basic techniques of classical ballet from DANC 1932. Prerequisite: DANC 1932.

(DEAC) Dance Education Activity

DEAC1961 Ballroom Dance (Sp) The fundamentals of ballroom dance.

(DRAM) Drama

DRAM1003 Basic Course in the Arts: Theatre Lecture (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to theatre arts; playwriting, directing, acting, and design. For the general student. May not be presented toward satisfaction of the B.A. in fine arts requirement by drama majors.

DRAM1003H Honors Basic Course in the Arts: Theatre Lecture (Sp, Su, Fa)

DRAM1223 Introduction to Dramatic Art (Sp, Fa) Introduction to an examination of the various elements that make up dramatic art. Study of the history, literature, theory, and practice of the theatre, from ancient to modern times, from the playwright to the producer.

DRAM1311L Stage Technology I Laboratory (Fa) Practical application of costume technology and makeup skills. Students will participate in projects involving the construction and preparation of costumes and makeup designs associated with departmental productions. Production running crew positions will also be assigned. Corequisite: DRAM 1313.

DRAM1313 Stage Technology I: Costumes and Makeup (Fa) Fundamentals of basic costume construction with an emphasis on techniques, materials, planning and process. Training in the basic principles of theatrical makeup application. Corequisite: DRAM 1311L.

DRAM1321L Stage Technology II Laboratory: Scenery and Lighting (Sp) Practical application of principles of scenery and lighting technology. Students will participate in projects involving the construction and preparation of scenery, stage properties, and lighting associated with departmental productions. Production running crew positions will also be assigned. Corequisite: DRAM 1323.

DRAM1323 Stage Technology II: Scenery and Lighting (Sp) Fundamentals of scenery and lighting technology with emphasis on theatre tools, equipment, and basic drafting. Training in basic principles and skills of stage carpentry, lighting technology and rigging. Corequisite: DRAM 1321L.

DRAM1683 Acting I (Sp, Su, Fa) An analytical approach to the actor's art with emphasis on the techniques of characterization.

DRAM2313 Introduction to Theatrical Design (Fa) Fundamentals of design for the theatre including costume, lighting, and scenery. Study of the designer's role in the production process, design requirements, and aesthetics. Emphasis on the basic principles of two-dimensional art and graphic forms through various media, and a study of color and color theory as they apply to the major areas of theatrical design. Prerequisite: DRAM 1323 and DRAM 1321L.

DRAM2683 Acting II (Sp) (Formerly DRAM 4603) Advanced theories and techniques of acting. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223 and DRAM 1683.

DRAM3001 Production Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) Credit for participation in technical assignments related to mainstage or faculty-directed productions: one (1) credit hour per production. Assignments shall be determined by the faculty. Credit will be awarded only after completion of assignments and only with faculty approval. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

DRAM3011 Performance Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) Credit for performance in faculty directed productions; one credit hour per production. Assignments shall be determined by the faculty. Credit will be awarded only after satisfactory completion of assignment and with faculty approval. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

DRAM3213 Costume Design I (Odd years, Fa) Study of the art and practice of stage costume design. Emphasis on the expression of character through costume. Development of rendering and research skills. Prerequisite: DRAM 1313, DRAM 1311L, and DRAM 2313.

DRAM3243 Costume Technology I (Odd years, Sp) Advanced methods of costume construction techniques and the exploration of theatrical pattern drafting will be practiced through projects. Prerequisite: DRAM 1313.

DRAM3433 Stage Speech (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to the basic skills of speech, voice production and communication for performance and broadcasting. Special focus on General American speech and the characteristics of speech regionalisms. The course will explore breath control, resonance, articulation, pitch, volume, voice quality and stress management. Prerequisite: DRAM 1683.

DRAM3653 Directing I (Sp) Basic principles and techniques of play directing with an emphasis on the modern realistic mode of production. Corequisite: Drama majors with at least junior standing. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223, DRAM 1313, DRAM 1323 and DRAM 2683.

DRAM3683 Stage Management (Odd years, Fa) Principles of stage management in the contest of academic and professional theatre production. Issues of theatre management and producing are addressed as they relate to play production activities. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223, DRAM 1313 and DRAM 1323.

DRAM3733 Stage Lighting I (Even years, Fa) Study of the art and practice of stage lighting; color theory; electricity and dimming systems; problems in design. Lecture-demonstration 3 hours, laboratory, by arrangement, coinciding with departmental productions, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: DRAM 1323, DRAM 1321L, and DRAM 2313.

DRAM3803 Development of the Drama (Sp, Fa) An introductory survey of theoretical approaches to theatre and drama. This course investigates various paradigms for understanding drama across traditional period boundaries. Readings include a cross-section of literary and performance theories ranging from the classical to the post-modern. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223.

DRAM3903 Theatrical Makeup (Even Years, Fa) The techniques and skills of theatrical makeup and design involved in the creation and execution of character makeup for the stage. Prerequisite: DRAM 1313.

DRAM3923H Honors Colloquium (Sp, Su, Fa) Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in drama).

DRAM399VH Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

DRAM406V Playwriting (Fa) (1-3) A workshop course for students who wish to attempt original work in the dramatic form. Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

DRAM4153 Musical Theatre Performance (Sp, Su, Fa) Principles and techniques of performing a singing role for the theatre. Examines the relationship between score and text. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM4233 History of the Theatre I (Fa) A survey of dramatic literature, theatre practices and cultural contexts for dramatic presentation from classical Greece through the Restoration. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223.

DRAM4333 History of the Theatre II (Sp) A survey of dramatic literature, theatre practices and cultural contexts for dramatic presentation from the 18th century to the mid-20th century. Emphasis is given to Western theatre practices. Prerequisite: DRAM 1223.

DRAM4453 History of the Theatre III (Sp) An examination of history and theory of modern theatrical styles.

DRAM4463 African American Theatre History -- 1950 to Present (Sp) A chronological examination of African-American theatre history from 1950 to the present through the study of African-American plays and political/social conditions. Upon completion of this course the student should be familiar with the major works of African-American theatre and have a deeper understanding of American History. (Same as AAST 499V)

DRAM4653 Scene Design I (Odd years, Sp) Theory and practice in the art of scenic design, including historical and contemporary styles and procedures. Practical experience gained through work on departmental productions. Prerequisite: DRAM 1323, DRAM 1321L and DRAM 2313.

DRAM4733 Dramatic Criticism (Sp, Su, Fa) Analysis of critical theories from Aristotle to the present; interrelationships of theatre disciplines as well as the influence of the church, state, and press on dramatic criticism. Prerequisite: DRAM 3803.

DRAM4773 Acting Shakespeare (Irregular) Work on the special techniques required for performance of the plays of special techniques required for performance of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. The cultural and theatrical context required for understanding the scripts. Special attention to the speaking of blank verse.

DRAM490V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individually designed and conducted programs of reading and reporting under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

DRAM491V Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Classes not listed in the regular curriculum, offered on demand on the basis of student needs and changes within the profession.

DRAM492V Internship (Irregular) (1-12) Supervised practice in the various arts and crafts of the theatre (e.g., full design responsibility for a box office management; actor apprenticeship in a professional company). Available only to those who have exhausted the regular curricular possibilities in the area of specialization. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

DRAM4953 Theatre Study in Britain (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the components of stage production through attending and critiquing a wide variety of classical, modern, and avant garde theatre productions in England; includes tours of London and historical British sites and seminars with British theatre artists.

DRAM5123 Theatrical Design Rendering Techniques (Sp, Su, Fa) Investigation of drawing and painting methods and materials useful to theatrical designers. Integration of graphic communication with overall production conceptualization will be explored through examination of various theatre styles and periods.

DRAM5143 History of Decor for the Stage (Even years, Sp) An overview of architectural decoration and its application to theatrical design from the Predynastic Period (4400-3200 B.C.) through the Art Deco period with references to contemporary decor. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

DRAM5163 Theatre Graphics and Technology (Irregular) Advanced study of theatre drafting, drawing and rendering techniques and model making. Graduate level project portfolio required.

DRAM5183 Scene Design Studio (Fa) Individual and advanced projects in designing scenery for various theatrical genres as well as non-theatrical applications with emphasis on the design process involving playscript analysis, text analysis, and research. Collaboration skills and advanced rendering techniques will be explored. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisite: DRAM 3653 or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5193 Scene Technology Studio (Sp) Individual and advanced projects in scenic techniques with emphasis on scene painting, drafting, rendering, properties design, or scenic crafts as determined by student need. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5213 Costume Design (Odd years, Fa) Advanced study of the art and practice of stage costume design. Emphasis on the expression of character through costume. Development of rendering and research skills. Portfolio development.

DRAM5243 Costume Technology I (Odd years, Sp) Advanced methods of costume construction techniques and the practice of theatrical pattern drafting will be explored through project work.

DRAM5253 Costume Technology II (Even years, Sp) Advanced study in methods of costume construction and pattern making techniques with emphasis on tailoring, draping, corsetry and costumes crafts as determined by student needs. Prerequisite: DRAM 3243 and DRAM 5243.

DRAM5283 Costume Design Studio (Fa) Individual and advanced projects in designing costumes for various theatrical genres with emphasis on the design process involving text interpretation, character analysis, and research. Collaboration skills and advanced rendering techniques will be explored. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisites: DRAM 3213 or DRAM 5213 or instructor consent.

DRAM5293 Costume Technology Studio (Sp) Individual and advanced projects in costume construction and techniques with emphasis on flat pattern, draping, corsetry, tailoring or costume crafts as determined by student need. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5353 Stage Lighting Technology (Sp, Su, Fa) The thorough examination of the technology of equipment that supports the art of stage lighting design: theory, operating principles and specification of lamps, fixtures, control systems and special effect hardware will be explored. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

DRAM5363 Theatre Planning (Irregular) A study of significant theatre buildings, modern and historical, and their relationship to contemporary theatre planning. Practical application of theory through design problems and evaluation. Graduate level research project/paper required.

DRAM5373 Theatre Management (Irregular) Comprehensive study of arts management including personnel, budget, audience development, operations and organization for professional, academic and community theatre and related performance areas. Practical application through actual production experience in the University Theatre. Graduate level research paper required.

DRAM5383 Lighting Technology Studio (Sp) Individual and advanced projects in lighting technology with emphasis on light sources, lighting control, equipment design and specification and the mechanics of lighting. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5393 Lighting Design Studio (Fa) Individual projects in lighting design with emphasis on the design process involving script interpretation, design aesthetics and research. Lighting design applications to a variety of venues will be studied. Contributes to on-going portfolio development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5413 Graduate Acting Principles (Sp, Su, Fa) An intensive study and practical application of acting techniques. Emphasizes the integration of the physical, emotional, and intellectual life of the character through work on monologues, scenes and exercises. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Drama.

DRAM5432 Graduate Stage Speech (Sp, Su, Fa) Focus will be on enabling the body's natural breathing mechanism to provide strong vocal support. Freedom from unnecessary tension, resonance, articulation and vocal hygiene will also be explored as they relate to clear vocal production. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5443 Graduate Acting: Period Styles (Sp) Styles of acting in relation to French and English Dramatic Literature (16th-19th Centuries). This course also examines the historical and cultural influences that shaped each genre. A period dance component is included. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Drama.

DRAM5453 Musical Theatre Performance (Sp, Su, Fa) Theory and techniques of performing a singing role for the theatre. Integrates acting and vocal techniques and examines the relationship between score and text. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Drama.

DRAM5473 Graduate Acting: Shakespeare (Sp, Su, Fa) Analysis of Shakespeare for performance. Work will include the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including cultural and theatrical contexts required for understanding the scripts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Drama.

DRAM5523 Graduate Playwriting: Non-Realism (Sp, Su, Fa) Advanced theory and technique in playwriting emphasizing non-traditional playwriting styles such as Expressionism, Surrealism, Epic Theatre and the American Musical. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

DRAM5533 Graduate Playwriting: Special Projects (Sp, Su, Fa) Advanced study and practice in the area of playwriting. The area of concentration will be determined by the student's specific writing project(s). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5613 Graduate Directing Principles (Sp, Su, Fa) Theory and technique of directing realistic drama: script analysis; spatial considerations of composition and picturization; development in production of the Aristotelian concepts of plot, character, thought, diction, music (sound), and spectacle. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

DRAM562V Seminar in Dramatic Art (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-9) Research, discussion and projects focusing on a variety of topics including theatre management, advanced acting methods, and specialized periods in dramatic literature. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5643 Dramaturgy (Irregular) To define the dramaturge's role in theatrical production and to introduce students to working models of structural and dramaturgical analysis. Also to teach the application of these analytical models to various genres of dramatic literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

DRAM5683 Directing Studio (Sp, Fa) Hands-on exploration into the direction of historical and contemporary texts and styles, including Greek, Roman, Shakespeare, Realism, American and international scripts and the adaptation of non-theatrical material. Topics vary each semester. Includes discussion and investigation of the theatrical arts and collaborative and production processes. Prerequisite: MFA Directing student or instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5691 Scene Study for Directing Studio (Sp, Fa) Participation as an actor in scenes presented for the graduate Directing Studio course. Varying historical and contemporary texts and styles each semester. Class meets one hour each week, plus outside rehearsals, depending on casting. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

DRAM5723 History of the Theatre I (Fa) A comprehensive study of the theatre in different cultures and ages, as an institution, as an art, and as a vision of life.

DRAM5733 History of the Theatre II (Sp) A continuation of DRAM 5723.

DRAM5763 Dramatic Criticism (Fa) Analysis of critical theories from Aristotle to the present; interrelationships of theatre disciplines as well as the influence of the church, state, and press on dramatic criticism. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing.

DRAM581V Theatre Production III (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Participation in the process of production for the University Theatre mainstage at a supervisory level. Areas of involvement may include scenery, lighting, sound, makeup, marketing, etc. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

DRAM590V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individually designed and conducted programs of reading and reporting under guidance of a faculty member.

DRAM591V Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Classes not listed in the regular curriculum, offered on demand on the basis of student needs and changes within the profession. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Drama or Instructor consent required.

DRAM592V Internship (Irregular) (1-6) Supervised practice in the various arts and crafts of the theatre (e.g. full design responsibility for a production; box office management; actor apprenticeship in a professional company).

DRAM600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(EASL) English as Second Language

EASL0021 Advanced English Grammar (Sp, Su, Fa) Presentation of a general overview of the verb, modal, and article in English. Review and practice on compound and complex sentences. Practice of grammatical structure orally and in writing. Not for degree credit. Prerequisite: ESL placement test.

EASL0023 Reading and Writing I (Sp, Su, Fa) Work on improving skills necessary to write a well-organized, thought-provoking essay incorporating paraphrased, summarized, and quoted ideas from various sources. Introduction to several rhetorical patterns. Critical reading skills practice, understanding inferences, and improving reading skills comprehension. Not for degree credit. Prerequisite: ESL placement test.

EASL0033 Reading and Writing II (Sp, Su, Fa) Advanced writing of formal documented, organized, and thought-provoking essays. Students will learn to read passages/articles in English proficiently and maintain discussion with near-native abilities and confidence. Not for degree credit. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ESL placement test.

EASL0041 Pronunciation (Sp, Su, Fa) Students learn to generate native-sounding speech and increase their intelligibility by working specifically on accent reduction, pronunciation, intonation patterns, and fluency. Credit earned in this course may not be applied to the total required for a degree. Prerequisite: ESL placement test.

EASL0053 ESL Listening and Speaking (Sp, Su, Fa) For improvement of aura/oral skills by international students. Includes the basic practice in fluency, clarity, intonation, stress, and pronunciation. Students give presentations and participate in academic discussions. Credit earned in this course may not be applied to the total required for a degree. Prerequisite: ESL placement test.

(ECON) Economics

ECON2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (Sp, Su, Fa) Macroeconomic analysis, including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy, growth and business cycles. Prerequisite: (MATH 1203 or higher) or (MATH ACT of 25 or higher) or (MATH SAT of 580 or higher).

ECON2013H Honors Principles of Macroeconomics (Fa) Macroeconomic analysis, including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy, growth and business cycles. Prerequisite: (MATH 1203 or higher) or (MATH ACT of 25 or higher) or (MATH SAT of 580 or higher).

ECON2023 Principles of Microeconomics (Sp, Su, Fa) Microeconomic analysis, including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. Prerequisite: (MATH 1203 or higher) or (MATH ACT of 25 or higher) or (MATH SAT of 580 or higher).

ECON2023H Honors Principles of Microeconomics (Sp) Microeconomic analysis, including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. Prerequisite: (MATH 1203 or higher) or (MATH ACT of 25 or higher) or (MATH SAT of 580 or higher).

ECON2143 Basic Economics-Theory and Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) Surveys basic micro, macro principles and analytical tools needed to study contemporary economic problems such as inflation, unemployment, poverty, and pollution. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration.

ECON3033 Microeconomic Theory (Sp, Su, Fa) Nature, scope, and purpose of economic analysis; theories of demand, production, cost, firm behavior, allocation of resources, etc., in a market-oriented system. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143) and (MATH 2043 or MATH 2554).

ECON3053 Economics for Elementary Teachers (Fa) For students who plan to become teachers in elementary schools. Acquaints students with basic concepts and functioning of the American economic system. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least 60 hours of coursework.

ECON3133 Macroeconomic Theory (Sp, Fa) Theoretical determinations of national aggregate employment, income, consumption, investment, price level, etc. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143) and ((MATH 2043 or MATH 2554)).

ECON3153 Economics of Electronic Commerce (Irregular) A combination of concepts from microeconomics, industrial organization, and macroeconomics in examining how electronic markets and the use of information impact economic activity. The course combines theoretical models, field data and cases to explore the issues of pricing strategy, network effects, information goods, market mechanisms and verifiability. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON3333 Public Economics (Irregular) Governmental functions, revenues; tax shifting, incidence; public expenditures, their effects; and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON3353 Law and Economics (Irregular) The use of economic tools to analyze public policy issues and explore the intersections between the law and economics. The course will provide students with an understanding of legal institutions, incentives they generate and issues surrounding current legal reforms. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON3433 Money and Banking (Sp, Fa) Financial history; theory and practice of financial institutions; monetary policy in theory and practice. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON3533 Labor Economics (Fa) Economic analysis of labor markets. Topics include analysis of labor demand and supply; human capital investment; wage differentials; discrimination; economic effects of labor unions and collective bargaining; public sector labor markets; unemployment; and labor market effects on inflation. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143

ECON3633 Economics of Advertising (Irregular) An examination of how economists define and categorize types of products and advertising campaigns. Alternative views of advertising -- persuasive vs. informative -- are discussed. Models of the relationship between advertising and sales, profits, market structure, product quality, and price are examined. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON3843 Economic Development, Poverty, & the Role of the World Bank and IMF in Low-Income Countries (Fa) Examine theories and patterns of economic development in emerging economies. The role of the World Bank and IMF as multilateral lenders and examination of their success and failures in fostering development. Measures of poverty and inequality and their implications for economic development. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON3853 Emerging Markets (Fa) An analysis of the business and economic environment in emerging countries; focusing in Latin America, South East Asia and Transition Economies. The topics and issues covered include market structure and market failures, financial and legal background, current institutions and political economy issues, and current business opportunities. Prerequisite: ECON 2143; or ECON 2013 and ECON 2023.

ECON3933 The Japanese Economic System (Sp) This class presents essential facts about the Japanese economy and then subjects them to modern economic analyses. Japanese institutions and policies are contrasted with their American counterparts, and these economies are compared in terms of performance. Current issues including contemporary economic conditions and US - Japanese trade relations are also examined. Pre- or Corequisite: ECON 2023. Prerequisite: ECON 2013 or ECON 2143.

ECON399VH Honors Course (Irregular) (1-3) Primarily for students participating in Honors program. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON4003H Honors Economics Colloquium (Irregular) Explores events, concepts and/or new developments in the field of Economics. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ECON4033 History of Economic Thought (Sp) Historical, critical analysis of economic theories relative to their instructional background. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143 or ECON 3053.

ECON410V Special Topics in Economics (Irregular) (1-6) Covers special topics in economics not available in other courses. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON410VH Honors Special Topics in Economics (Irregular) (1-6) Covers special topics in economics not available in other courses. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON4143 Information Economics (Irregular) A combination of concepts from microeconomics, industrial organization, and probability to examine how economic actors use information in decision-making. The course combines theoretical models and cases to develop an understanding of risk, uncertainty, insurance, and ambiguity. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON4333 Economics of Organizations (Fa) An economic perspective on the design of organizations. Applies developments in game theory and contract theory to analyze the role of information and incentives within and between firms. Covers the boundaries of firms, integration and outsourcing, authority and incentives, and alternative organizational structures in an evolving business environment. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON4423 Behavioral Economics (Fa) Both economics and psychology systematically study human judgment, behavior, and well-being. This course surveys attempts to incorporate psychology into economics to better understand how people make decisions in economic situations. The course will cover models of choice under uncertainty, choice over time, as well as procedural theories of decision making. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON4433 Experimental Economics (Sp) The course offers an introduction to the field of experimental economics. Included are the methodological issues associated with developing, conducting, and analyzing controlled laboratory experiments. Standard behavioral results are examined and the implications of such behavior for business and economic theory are explored. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON450V Independent Study (Irregular) (1-6) Permits students on individual basis to explore selected topics in economics. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON4633 International Trade (Sp, Fa) Problems of the international economy from a microeconomic perspective. Topics include analysis of the pattern and content of trade; trade in factors of production; and the applications of trade theory to the study of trade barriers such as tariffs and quotas. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON4643 International Macroeconomics and Finance (Sp, Fa) Problems of the international economy from a macroeconomic perspective. Topics include national income accounting and the balance of payments; exchange rates and the foreign exchange markets; exchange rate policy; macroeconomic policy coordination; developing countries and the problem of 3rd world debt; and the global capital market. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON468V International Economics and Business Seminar (Irregular) (1-6) Offered primarily in conjunction with international study abroad programs with an emphasis on international economics and business. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON4743 Introduction to Econometrics (Sp) Introduction to the application of statistical methods to problems in economics. Prerequisite: ((ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143) and (((MATH 2053 or MATH 2053C) and MATH 2043) or (MATH 2554 or higher)) and (WCOB 1033 or STAT 2303).

ECON4753 Forecasting (Fa) The application of forecasting methods to economics, management, engineering, and other natural and social sciences. The student will learn how to recognize important features of time series and will be able to estimate and evaluate econometric models that fit the data reasonably well and allow the construction of forecasts. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023 or ECON 2143) and (MATH 2043 or MATH 2554) and (MATH 2053 or MATH 2053C) and (WCOB 1033 or STAT 2303).

ECON5233 Mathematics for Economic Analysis (Su) This course will develop mathematical and statistical skills for learning economics and related fields. Topics include calculus, static optimization, real analysis, linear algebra, convex analysis, and dynamic optimization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and MATH 2554 or equivalent.

ECON5243 Economics of Supply Chain & Retail (Sp) This course will provide students with a strong foundation in core economics principles, with emphasis on industrial organization issues and applications geared toward the supply-chain and retail focus of the redesigned MBA program.

ECON5433 Macroeconomic Theory I (Fa) Theoretical development of macroeconomic models that include and explain the natural rate of unemployment hypothesis and rational expectations, consumer behavior, demand for money, market clearing models, investment, and fiscal policy.

ECON5533 Microeconomic Theory I (Fa) Introductory microeconomic theory at the graduate level. Mathematical formulation of the consumer choice, producer behavior, and market equilibrium problems at the level of introductory calculus. Discussion of monopoly, oligopoly, public goods, and externalities.

ECON5613 Econometrics I (Fa) Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. The single equation model is examined emphasizing multicollinearity, autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity, binary variables and distributed lags. Prerequisite: MATH 2043 and knowledge of matrix methods, which may be acquired as a corequisite and (AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023) and an introductory statistics course. (Same as AGEC 5613)

ECON5853 International Economics Policy (Irregular) An intensive analysis of the operation of the international economy with emphasis on issues of current policy interest. Prerequisite: ECON 5163.

ECON600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ECON6233 Microeconomic Theory II (Sp) Advanced treatment of the central microeconomic issues using basic real analysis. Formal discussion of duality, general equilibrium, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty, and game theory.

ECON6243 Macroeconomic Theory II (Sp) Further development of macroeconomic models to include uncertainty and asset pricing theory. Application of macroeconomic models to explain real world situations.

ECON6253 Microeconomics III (Fa) This course will develop advanced concepts in information economics and game theory which will then be applied to the design of contracts, insurance, bargaining and auctions. Prerequisites: ECON 5533 and ECON 6233.

ECON636V Special Problems in Economics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Independent reading and investigation in economics. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON643V Seminar in Economic Theory and Research I (Fa) (1-3)

ECON644V Seminar in Economic Theory and Research II (Sp) (1-3) Independent research and group discussion.

ECON6533 Seminar in Advanced Economics I (Irregular) This seminar will cover advanced fields of current research importance in economics. This will facilitate the development of research directions for doctoral study and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ECON6543 Seminar in Advanced Economics II (Irregular) This seminar will cover advanced fields of current research importance in economics. This will facilitate the development of research directions for doctoral study and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ECON6623 Econometrics II (Sp) Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. The treatment of measurement error and limited dependent variables and the estimation of multiple equation models and basic panel data models will be covered. Additional frontier techniques may be introduced. Prerequisites: ECON 5613 or AGEC 5613.

ECON6633 Econometrics III (Sp) Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. Nonlinear and semiparametric/nonparametric methods, dynamic panel data methods, and time series analysis (both stationary and nonstationary processes) will be covered. Additional frontier techniques may be covered. Prerequisite: ECON 5613 or AGEC 5613.

ECON700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(EDFD) Educational Foundations

EDFD2403 Statistics in Nursing (Sp) Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics used in nursing research.

EDFD5303 Historical Foundations of Modern Education (Sp, Su) Critical analysis and interpretation of the historical antecedents of contemporary education, focusing upon the American experience from the colonial period to the present.

EDFD5323 Global Education (Irregular) Comparative and global analysis of international education with emphasis on cultural education and implications for the future.

EDFD5353 Philosophy of Education (Irregular) Introduction to the method and attitude essential to effective analysis and interpretation of issues and values within a society reflecting cultural, ethnic, gender, and global diversity. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDFD5373 Psychological Foundations of Teaching and Learning (Irregular) Psychological principles and research applied to classroom learning and instruction. Social, emotional, and intellectual factors relevant to topics such as readiness, motivation, discipline, and evaluation in the classroom.

EDFD5473 Adolescent Psychology in Education (Irregular) Study of the adolescent experience with emphasis on the unique psychological problems and tasks of this developmental stage; role of educators in the facilitation of crises resolutions in social, personal and institutional conflicts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDFD5573 Life-Span Human Development (Sp, Su, Fa) Basic principles of development throughout the human life-cycle. Physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and personality development.

EDFD5673 Principles of Motivation (Sp) This course focuses on theories and concepts of human motivation. Students explore what motivates students to learn and examine strategies, techniques, and interventions that promote and sustain learner motivation.

EDFD5683 Issues in Educational Policy (Sp, Su, Fa) This course examines how K-12 education policy is designed and implemented in the United States. Students will develop a working knowledge of policymaking frameworks to examine major education policies of current interest and debate key policy issues that arise at each level of government.

(EDLE) Educational Leadership

EDLE5013 School Organization and Administration (Fa and Odd years, Su) Analysis of structure and organization of American public education; fundamental principles of school management and administration.

EDLE5023 The School Principalship (Sp, Su) Duties and responsibilities of the public school building administrator; examination and analysis of problems, issues, and current trends in the theory and practice of the principalship.

EDLE5033 Psychology of Learning (Sp, Odd years Su) This course prepares educational leaders to create and sustain a learning centered environment in school settings. Students will study learning theory across the lifespan and apply it to the practice of instructional leadership, curriculum design, and staff development.

EDLE5043 Leadership Ethics (Fa, Odd years Su) Leadership Ethics is an experiential based course grounded in ethical decision making theory that uses case study and practice to study school based ethical dilemmas.

EDLE5053 School Law (Fa and Odd years, Su) Legal aspects of public and private schooling: federal and state legislative statues and judicial decisions, with emphasis upon Arkansas public education.

EDLE5063 Instructional Leadership, Planning, and Supervision (Fa and Odd years, Su) Instructional Leadership, Planning, and Supervision is designed to prepare practitioners to seize the role of educational leader at the school site level through the development of a vision that will be used to drive a data driven instructional school plan.

EDLE5073 Research for Leaders (Sp, Odd years Su) This course introduces research methodology that will support school leaders as consumers of educational research and supervisors of action research within their schools. Practical application of research for school leaders is emphasized.

EDLE5083 Analytical Decision-Making (Sp, Even years Su) Analytical Decision Making is a performance based examination of the principles and practices related to the building administrator's role in the development, administration, and evaluation of curricular programs in public schools. This includes creating a school culture, fostering communication, aligning curriculum with state mandated standards, and staff development.

EDLE5093 Effective Leadership for School Improvement (Sp, Su, Fa) A performance based examination of strategic planning, group facilitation and decision-making, organizational behavior and development, professional ethics and standards, student services administration, and principles of effective leadership.

EDLE574V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Supervised in-school/district experiences individually designed to afford opportunities to apply previously-acquired knowledge and skills in administrative workplace settings. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

EDLE599V Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EDLE6023 School Facilities Planning and Management (Odd years, Fa) School facilities planning, management, cost analysis, operations, and maintenance of the school plant.

EDLE6053 School-Community Relations (Even years, Sp) Community analysis, politics and education; power groups and influences; school issues and public responses; local policy development and implementation; effective communication and public relations strategies.

EDLE605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EDLE6093 School District Governance: The Superintendency (Even years, Fa) Analysis of the organizational and governance structures of American public education at national, state, and local levels.

EDLE6103 School Finance (Odd years, Sp) Principles, issues and problems of school funding formulae and fiscal allocations to school districts.

EDLE6173 School Business Management (Odd years, Su) Fiscal and resource management in public schools: budgeting, insurance, purchasing, and accounting.

EDLE6333 Advanced Fiscal and Legal Issues in Education (Odd years, Sp) The examination and discussion of advanced legal and fiscal issues affecting public school education. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing.

EDLE6503 Topics in Educational Research for School Administration (Odd years, Fa) Application of educational research in the school setting by educational administrators. Emphasis placed on the use of state and local school or district data, data analysis, interpretation and reporting, hands-on experience with SPSS, and the formal process of writing a research report. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing.

EDLE6523 Advanced Application of Educational Leadership (Odd years, Su) A review of seminal and current works on leadership as applied to the educational setting. Provides knowledge of classic and contemporary strategies for leadership.

EDLE6533 Educational Policy (Odd years, Sp) Examination of the research and theory related to the evolution of local, state, and federal governance and educational policy. Emphasis given to the consideration of procedures involving policy formulation, implementation, and analysis.

EDLE6563 Educational Administration and Human Behavior (Odd years, Fa) Examination of research and theory related to the utilization of human resources with educational organizations.

EDLE660V Workshop (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EDLE674V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EDLE680V Educational Specialist Project (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) An original project, research project, or report required of all Ed.S. Degree candidates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ed.S. program.

EDLE699V Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EDLE700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(EDRE) Education Reform

EDRE6023 Economics of Education (Sp) This course applies the principles of economic analysis to education and education reform. Topics include: Human capital and signaling theories; education labor markets; educational production functions; public policy and market forces. The course also features empirical evidence evaluating economic theories of education.

EDRE6033 Politics of Education (Fa) This course explores historical and institutional forces that help shape education policymaking. Particular attention will be paid to the experience of past education reform movements as well as the influence of interest groups, federalism, bureaucracy, governance structures, public opinion, and judicial review on education policy.

EDRE6043 Finance and Education Policy (Fa) This course examines K-12 education finance from the standpoint of education reform policy. The tools of analysis include economics, public finance, law and political science. Topics include: revenue sources and fiscal federalism, standards-based reform and school finance, school funding formulas, adequacy lawsuits, the politics of school funding, school funding and markets. The course also features empirical evidence on the educational impact of education finance.

EDRE6053 Measurement of Educational Outcomes (Sp) This course will train students to consider the various types of outcome and assessment measures used for education at the K-12 level throughout the United States; further, the students will engage in analyses of research that relies on these various outcome measures.

EDRE6213 Program Evaluation and Research Design (Fa) This course provides students with training in the methods used to generate evidence-based answers to questions regarding the efficacy and impacts of education programs. The central questions that motivate most educational program evaluations are: (1) What is the problem? (2) What policies or programs are in place to address the problem? (3) What is their effect? (4) What works better? (5) What are the relative benefits and costs of alternatives? (Same as ESRM 6613)

EDRE6223 Research Seminar in Education Policy (Sp) This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about education policy research by interacting directly with the leading scholars and practitioners in the field. Students will also gain a foundation in the field of education policy research by reading and discussing some of the founding works of the field.

EDRE6413 Issues in Education Policy (Fa) This course examines how K-12 education policy is designed and implemented in the United States. Students will develop a working knowledge of policymaking frameworks to examine major education policies of current interest and debate key policy issues that arise at each level of government. In great measure, the goals of the course will be accomplished through the consideration of opposing stances on key educational policy debates and issues that are of current import.

EDRE6423 Seminar in School Choice Policy (Even years, Fa) This course examines parental school choice - perhaps the most controversial education reform of our age. Students will be introduced to the full set of school choice policies, including charter schools and vouchers, and evaluate their benefits and drawbacks as educational interventions.

EDRE6433 Seminar in Education Accountability Policy (Odd years, Sp) This course examines K-12 school and district accountability under state and Federal law (e.g. NCLB), as well as teacher and student accountability (e.g. exit exams). Topics include the theory of incentives and politics of tradeoffs, measurement issues of policy implementation, and statistical evidence on policy effects on performance.

EDRE6443 Seminar in Education Leadership Policy (Odd years, Fa) This course will examine the individual and systemic prerequisites of effective leadership of schools and school systems, and effective leadership techniques. It will consider the differences between public and private sector leadership. It will also explore ways to identify effective and ineffective leaders, and design and evaluate systems to recruit and train the former and reassign the latter.

EDRE6453 Seminar in Teacher Quality and Public Policy (Sp) Examines how our public system of education shapes the preparation and continued professional development of K-12 teachers, and how that system has been influenced by standards-based education reform as well as efforts to enhance the quality of teaching and learning in public schools. Uses education reform legislation in several states as case studies to illustrate the successes and pitfalls of attempts to reform teacher education and licensure through public policy.

(EDUC) Education

EDUC100V Freshman Seminar (Irregular) (1-3) The course is designed to support and assist freshmen in becoming successful, self-directed learners. Focus will be upon campus resources to help learners accomplish this goal and upon strategies for successful learning. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

EDUC1012 College Learning I (Sp, Fa) EDUC 1021 supports students as they make the transition into a university environment. The focus is on developing and applying college-level thinking and learning skills to specific University courses and on developing a student support base through a class learning community. The course is required for students admitted provisionally to the University.

EDUC1021 College Learning II (Sp, Fa) EDUC 1021 is a full-semester course required for those students who complete EDUC 1012 but still remain on provisional admission status. The focus is on long-term memory development, goal setting, preparing for a career, conducting research, and making presentations.

(ELEG) Electrical Engineering

ELEG2101L Electric Circuits I Laboratory (Fa) Experimental investigation of the steady-state behavior of resistive circuits excited by DC sources and transient behavior of simple R, L, and C circuits. Topics include fundamental laws of circuit theory applied to resistive networks and time response functions of R-L and R-C circuits. Corequisite: ELEG 2103.

ELEG2103 Electric Circuits I (Fa) Introduction to circuit variables, elements, and simple resistive circuits. Analysis techniques applied to resistive circuits. The concept of inductance, capacitance and mutual inductance. The natural and step responses of RL, RC, and RLC circuits. Corequisite: ELEG 2101L. Prerequisite: MATH 2564.

ELEG2111L Electric Circuits II Laboratory (Sp) Experimental investigation of the steady-state behavior of circuits excited by sinusoidal sources. Topics include complex power, three-phase circuits, transformers, and resonance. Corequisite: ELEG 2113.

ELEG2113 Electric Circuits II (Sp) Introduction to complex numbers. Sinusoidal steady-state analysis of electric circuits, active, reactive, apparent and complex power; balanced and unbalanced three-phase circuits; mutual inductance; the use of the Laplace transform for electric circuit analysis and two-port networks. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 3404. Corequisite: ELEG 2111L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2103.

ELEG2904 Digital Design (Fa) To introduce students to modern logic concepts, problem solving and design principles, and vocabulary and philosophy of the digital world. (Same as CSCE 2114)

ELEG2913 Digital Design II (Sp) Topics in digital hardware design include memory systems to include registers and both static and dynamic RAM, finite state machine (FSM) design approach, FSM optimization, FSM minimization/reduction and assignment, asynchronous circuits, and PLD implementations. Students will also be introduced to Mentor design software as well as VHDL. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ELEG 2903.

ELEG3083H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honor student.

ELEG3121L System and Signal Laboratory (Fa) Laboratory exercises associated with ELEG 3123 - System & Signal Analysis. Corequisite: ELEG 3123.

ELEG3123 System & Signal Analysis (Fa) Definition and description of signals and systems; analog, digital, continuous- and discrete-time and frequency analysis of systems, Z- and Fourier Transforms, sampling and signal reconstruction, filter design and engineering applications. Pre- or Corequisite: ELEG 3121L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113.

ELEG3123H Honors System & Signal Analysis (Fa) Definition and description of signals and systems; analog, digital, continuous- and discrete-time and frequency analysis of systems, Z- and Fourier Transforms, sampling and signal reconstruction, filter design and engineering applications. Pre- or Corequisite: ELEG 3121L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113.

ELEG3211L Electronics I Laboratory (Fa) Experimental investigation into electronic circuit analysis concepts. Topics include: diode behavior and applications, zener diode regulator design, bipolar junction transistor biasing, BJT common-emitter amplifier design, and operational amplifier fundamentals. Corequisite: ELEG 3213.

ELEG3213 Electronics I (Fa) Introduction to electronic systems and signal processing, operational amplifiers, diodes, non-linear circuit applications, MOSFETS, and BJTs. Corequisite: ELEG 3211L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113 and PHYS 2074 and MATH 2574.

ELEG3213H Honors Electronics I (Fa) Introduction to electronic systems and signal processing, operational amplifiers, diodes, non-linear circuit applications, MOSFETS, and BJTs. Corequisite: ELEG 3211L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113 and PHYS 2074 and MATH 2574.

ELEG3221L Electronics II Laboratory (Sp) Selected experiments to illustrate and complement topics covered in companion course ELEG 3223 - Electronics II Laboratory. Corequisite: ELEG 3223.

ELEG3223 Electronics II (Sp) Differential pair amplifier, current mirrors, active loads, multistage amplifiers, amplifier frequency response, bode plots, Millers theorem, short circuit and open circuit time constant methods, feedback amplifiers, and stability of feedback amplifiers. Corequisite: ELEG 3221L. Prerequisite: ELEG 3213 and MATH 3404.

ELEG3223H Honors Electronics II (Sp) Differential pair amplifier, current mirrors, active loads, multistage amplifiers, amplifier frequency response, bode plots, Millers theorem, short circuit and open circuit time constant methods, feedback amplifiers, and stability of feedback amplifiers. Corequisite: ELEG 3221L. Prerequisite: ELEG 3213 and MATH 3404.

ELEG3301L Electromechanical Energy Conversion Laboratory (Sp) This course is the associated laboratory component of ELEG 3303 - Electromechanical Energy Conversion. The following topics are covered: three-phase measurements, no-load, short-circuit and load tests of transformers, no-load, blocked-roter and load tests of induction machines and synchronous machines, and speed control of induction machines. Corequisite: ELEG 3303.

ELEG3303 Electromechanical Energy Conversion (Sp) Steady state analysis of DC machines, transformers, induction machines and synchronous machines. Introduction to speed control of electric machines using power electronics. Corequisite: ELEG 3301L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113 or (PHYS 2074 and ELEG 3903).

ELEG3303H Honors Electromechanical Energy Conversion (Sp) Steady state analysis of DC machines, transformers, induction machines and synchronous machines. Introduction to speed control of electric machines using power electronics. Corequisite: ELEG 3301L. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113 or (PHYS 2074 and ELEG 3903).

ELEG3703 Electromagnetics I (Sp) Analysis of transmission lines with sinusoidal and transient excitation. Development and use of the Smith Chart and methods of impedance matching. Vector analysis, static form of Maxwell's equations, electrostatics, and magnetostatics. Pre- or Corequisite: PHYS 2074 and MATH 2574.

ELEG3703H Honors Electromagnetics I (Sp) Analysis of transmission lines with sinusoidal and transient excitation. Development and use of the Smith Chart and methods of impedance matching. Vector analysis, static form of Maxwell's equations, electrostatics, and magnetostatics. Pre- or Corequisite: PHYS 2074 and MATH 2574.

ELEG388V Special Problems (Irregular) (1-18) One to 3 hours of credit. Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

ELEG388VH Honors Special Problems (irregular) (1-18) One to 3 hours of credit. Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ELEG3903 Electric Circuits and Machines (Sp, Fa) Basic electrical principles and circuits, some application to electromechanical systems. For engineering students other than those in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 and PHYS 2074.

ELEG3913 Engineering Electronics (Fa) Basic theory and applications of electronic devices and circuits. For engineering students other than those in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: ELEG 3903.

ELEG3923 Microprocessor Systems Design (Sp, Fa) Introduction to 16-bit microprocessors and their application. Microprocessor architecture and program language; interface devices; system design using microprocessors. Laboratory application. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: ELEG 2903 or ELEG 3913.

ELEG3923H Honors Microprocessor Systems Design (Sp, Fa) Introduction to 16-bit microprocessors and their application. Microprocessor architecture and program language; interface devices; system design using microprocessors. Laboratory application. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: ELEG 2903 or ELEG 3913.

ELEG3933 Circuits & Electronics (Sp) Basic principles of electric and electronic circuits and devices. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and PHYS 2074.

ELEG400V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ELEG400VH Honors Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Prerequisite: senior standing.

ELEG4061 Electrical Engineering Design I (Sp, Fa) Design and application in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: ELEG 3223 and ELEG 3923.

ELEG4061H Honors Electrical Engineering Design I (Sp, Fa) Design and application in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: ELEG 3223 and ELEG 3923.

ELEG4071 Electrical Engineering Design II (Sp, Fa) Design and application in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: ELEG 4061.

ELEG4071H Honors Electrical Engineering Design II (Sp, Fa) Design and application in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: ELEG 4061.

ELEG4143 Stochastic Signal Processing (Fa) Review of system analysis, probability, random variables, stochastic processes, auto correlation, power spectral density, systems with random inputs in the time and frequency domain, and applications. Pre- or Corequisite: ELEG 3123.

ELEG4143H Honors Stochastic Signal Processing (Fa) Review of system analysis, probability, random variables, stochastic processes, auto correlation, power spectral density, systems with random inputs in the time and frequency domain, and applications. Pre- or Corequisite: ELEG 3123.

ELEG4203 Semiconductor Devices (Irregular) Crystal properties and growth of semiconductors, energy bands and charge carriers in semiconductors, excess carriers in semiconductors, analysis and design of p/n junctions, analysis and design of bipolar junction transistors, and analysis and design of field-effect transistors. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and ELEG 3213, or graduate standing.

ELEG4203H Honors Semiconductor Devices (Irregular) Crystal properties and growth of semiconductors, energy bands and charge carriers in semiconductors, excess carriers in semiconductors, analysis and design of p/n junctions, analysis and design of bipolar junction transistors, and analysis and design of field-effect transistors. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

ELEG4213 MEMS and Microsensors (Fa) The aim of this course is to teach the theory and developments in MEMS, microsensors, NEMS and smart devices and to train the students for the fabrication using microfabrication tools in the clean room. The students will design, fabricate and characterize a MEMS/Microsensor device during the lab hours at the HiDEC clean room.

ELEG4223 Design and Fabrication of Solar Cells (Irregular) Solar insolation and its spectral distribution; p-n junction solar cells in dark and under illumination; solar cell parameters efficiency limits and losses; standard cell technology; energy accounting; design of silicon solar cells using simulation; fabrication of designed devices in the lab and their measurements.

ELEG4233 Introduction to Integrated Circuit Design (Irregular) Design and layout of large scale digital integrated circuits using NMOS and CMOS technology. Topics include MOS devices and basic circuits, integrated circuit layout and fabrication, dynamic logic, circuit design, and layout strategies for large scale NMOS and CMOS circuits. Prerequisite: ELEG 3213 or ELEG 3933 and MATH 3404. (Same as CSCE 4333)

ELEG4233H Honors Introduction to Integrated Circuit Design (Irregular) Design and layout of large scale digital integrated circuits using NMOS and CMOS technology. Topics include MOS devices and basic circuits, integrated circuit layout and fabrication, dynamic logic, circuit design, and layout strategies for large scale NMOS and CMOS circuits. Prerequisite: ELEG 3213 or ELEG 3933 and MATH 3404. (Same as CSCE 4333)

ELEG4243 Analog Integrated Circuits (Irregular) Theory and design techniques for linear and analog integrated circuits. Current mirrors, voltage to base emitter matching, active loads, compensation, level shifting, amplifier design techniques, circuit simulation using computer-assisted design programs. Prerequisite: ELEG 3223.

ELEG4253 Nanotechnology (Irregular) The objective of this course is to present a concise and concurrent introduction to Nanotechnology and its applications in engineering and medicine, particularly for nanoelectronics, nanosensors and nanocomputing. This course presents basic aspects of the nanotechnology, its fabrication and imaging technologies and integration of biomolecules with electronic systems for the design of devices in nanoelectronics, nanobioelectronics and Nanomedicine. Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor permission. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ELEG4283 Mixed Signal Test Engineering I (Irregular) Overview of mixed signal testing, the test specification process, DC and parametric measurements, measurement accuracy, tester hardware, sampling theory, DSP-based testing, analog channel testing, digital channel testing. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing.

ELEG4293 Mixed-Signal Modeling & Simulation (Irregular) Study of basic analog, digital & mixed signal simulation solution methods. Modeling with hardware description languages. Use of state-of-the-art simulators and HDLs. Prerequisite: ELEG 3223

ELEG4323 Switch Mode Power Conversion (Irregular) Basic switching converter topologies: buck, boost, buck-boost, Cuk, flyback, resonant; pulse-width modulation; integrated circuit controllers; switching converter design case studies; SPICE analyses of switching converters; state-space averaging and linearization; and switching converter transfer functions. Prerequisite: ELEG 3223 and ELEG 3123.

ELEG4403 Control Systems (Irregular) Mathematical modeling of dynamic systems, stability analysis, control system architectures and sensor technologies. Time-domain and frequency-domain design of feedback control systems: lead, lag, PID compensators. Special topics in microprocessor implementation. Prerequisite: ELEG 3123. (Same as MEEG 4213)

ELEG4403H Honors Control Systems (Irregular) Mathematical modeling of dynamic systems, stability analysis, control system architectures and sensor technologies. Time-domain and frequency-domain design of feedback control systems: lead, lag, PID compensators. Special topics in microprocessor implementation. Prerequisite: ELEG 3123.

ELEG4413 Advanced Control Systems (Irregular) A second course in linear control systems. Emphasis on multiple-input and multiple-output systems: State-space analysis, similarity transformations, eigenvalue and eigenvector decomposition, stability in the sense of Lyapunov, controllability and observability, pole placement, quadratic optimization. Credit not given for both ELEG 4413 and ELEG 5403. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403 or equivalent course.

ELEG4463L Control Systems Laboratory (Irregular) Experimental study of various control systems and components. The use of programmable logic controllers in the measurement of systems parameters, ladder-logic applications, process-control applications, and electromechanical systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403.

ELEG4503 Design of Advanced Electric Power Distribution Systems (Irregular) Design considerations of electric power distribution systems, including distribution transformer usage, distribution system protection implementation, primary and secondary networks design, applications of advanced equipment based on power electronics, and use of capacitors and voltage regulation. Prerequisite: ELEG 3303.

ELEG4503H Honors Design of Advanced Electric Power Distribution Systems (Irregular) Design considerations of electric power distribution systems, including distribution transformer usage, distribution system protection implementation, primary and secondary networks design, applications of advanced equipment based on power electronics, and use of capacitors and voltage regulation. Prerequisite: ELEG 3303.

ELEG4513 Power and Energy Systems Analysis (Irregular) Modeling and analysis of electric power systems: Energy sources and conversion; load flow analysis; reference frame transformations; symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault conditions; load forecasting and economic dispatch. Prerequisite: ELEG 2113.

ELEG4623 Communication Systems (Irregular) Various modulation systems used in communications. AM and FM fundamentals, pulse modulation, signal to noise ratio, threshold in FM, the phase locked loop, matched filter detection, probability of error in PSK, FKS, and DPSK. The effects of quantization and thermal noise in digital systems. Information theory and coding. Pre- or Corequisite: ELEG 4143.

ELEG4723 Introduction to RF and Microwave Design (Irregular) An introduction to microwave design principles. Transmission lines, passive devices, networks, impedance matching, filters, dividers, and hybrids will be discussed in detail. Active microwave devices will also be introduced. In addition, the applications of this technology as it relates to radar and communications systems will be reviewed. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG4723H Honors Introduction to RF and Microwave Design (Irregular) An introduction to microwave design principles. Transmission lines, passive devices, networks, impedance matching, filters, dividers, and hybrids will be discussed in detail. Active microwave devices will also be introduced. In addition, the applications of this technology as it relates to radar and communications systems will be reviewed. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG4733 Introduction to Antennas (Irregular) Basic antenna types: small dipoles, half wave dipoles, image theory, monopoles, small loop antennas. Antenna arrays: array factor, uniformly excited equally spaced arrays, pattern multiplication principles, nonuniformly excited arrays, phased arrays. Use of MATLAB programming and mathematical techniques for antenna analysis and design. Emphasis will be on using simulation to visualize variety of antenna radiation patterns. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG4733H Honors Introduction to Antennas (Irregular) Basic antenna types: small dipoles, half wave dipoles, image theory, monopoles, small loop antennas. Antenna arrays: array factor, uniformly excited equally spaced arrays, pattern multiplication principles, nonuniformly excited arrays, phased arrays. Use of MATLAB programming and mathematical techniques for antenna analysis and design. Emphasis will be on using simulation to visualize variety of antenna radiation patterns. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG4773 Electronic Response of Biological Tissues (Irregular) Understand the electric and magnetic response of biological tissues with particular reference to neural and cardiovascular systems. Passive and active forms of electric signals in cell communication. We will develop the central electrical mechanisms from the membrane channel to the organ, building on those excitation, dielectric models for tissue behavior, Debye, Cole-Cole models. Role of bound and free water on tissue properties. Magnetic response of tissues. Experimental methods to measure tissue response. Applications to Electrocardiography & Electroencephalography, Microwave Medical Imaging, RF Ablation will be discussed that are common to many electrically active cells in the body. Analysis of Nernst equation, Goldman equation, linear cable theory, and Hodgkin-Huxley Model of action potential generation and propagation. High frequency response of tissues to microwave. Prerequisites: ELEG 3703 or equivalent; MATH 3404 or equivalent; basic Biology. (Same as BENG 4283)

ELEG487V Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current electrical engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ELEG487VH Honors Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current electrical engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ELEG488V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ELEG488VH Honors Special Problems (Irregular) (1-3) Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ELEG4914 Advanced Digital Design (Irregular) To master advanced logic design concepts, including the design and testing of synchronous and asynchronous combinational and sequential circuits using state of the art CAD tools. Prerequisite: ELEG 2904 or CSCE 2114. (Same as CSCE 4914)

ELEG4963 CPLD/FPGA Based System Design (Irregular) Field Programmable logic devices (FPGAs/CPLDs) have become extremely popular as basic building blocks for digital systems. They offer a general architecture that users can customize by inducing permanent or reversible physical changes. This course will deal with the implementation of logic options using these devices. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ELEG 2913. (Same as CSCE 4353)

ELEG4963H Honors CPLD/FPGA Based System Design (Irregular) Field Programmable logic devices (FPGAs/CPLDs) have become extremely popular as basic building blocks for digital systems. They offer a general architecture that users can customize by inducing permanent or reversible physical changes. This course will deal with the implementation of logic options using these devices. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ELEG 2913. (Same as CSCE 4353)

ELEG4983 Computer Architecture (Irregular) Design of a single board computer including basic computer organization, memory subsystem design, peripheral interfacing, DMA control, interrupt control, and bus organization. Prerequisite: ELEG 3923. (Same as CSCE 4213)

ELEG5173L Digital Signal Processing Laboratory (Irregular) Use of DSP integrated circuits. Lectures, demonstrations, and projects. DSP IC architectures and instruction sets. Assembly language programming. Development tools. Implementation of elementary DSP operations, difference equations, transforms and filters. Prerequisite: ELEG 4603.

ELEG5193L Advanced DSP Processors Laboratory (Irregular) Familiarization with, and use of, advanced DSP processors. Parallel processor configurations, timing consideration, specialized programming techniques, and complex pipelines. Prerequisite: ELEG 5173L.

ELEG5213 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Technology (Irregular) Theory and techniques of integrated circuit fabrication technology; crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition, impurity diffusion, oxidation, ion implantation, photolithography and medullization. Design and analysis of device fabrication using SUPREM and SEDAN. In-process analysis techniques. Student review papers and presentations on state of the art fabrication and device technology. Prerequisite: ELEG 4203.

ELEG5243L Microelectronic Fabrication Techniques and Procedures (Sp, Fa) The Thin-Film Fabrication course is designed to prepare students to use the thin-film equipment and processes available at the Engineering Research Center's thin-film cleanroom. The process modules to be trained on include lithography, metal deposition and etching, oxide deposition, growth and etching, reactive dry etching, tantalum anodization, photodefinable spin-on dielectric and electroplating. The related metrology modules include microscope inspection, spectrophotometric measurement of oxide, profilometry and four-point probe measurements. Prerequisite: ELEG 5273.

ELEG5253L Integrated Circuit Design Laboratory I (Irregular) Design and layout of large scale digital integrated circuits. Students design, check, and simulate digital integrated circuits which will be fabricated and tested in I.C. Design Laboratory II. Topics include computer-aided design, more in-depth coverage of topics from ELEG 4233, and design of very large scale chips. Prerequisite: ELEG 4233.

ELEG5263L Integrated Circuit Design Laboratory II (Irregular) Students test the I.C. chips they designed in I.C. Design Laboratory I and propose design corrections where needed. Topics include gate arrays, bipolar design, I2L, memory design, and microprocessor design. Prerequisite: ELEG 5253L.

ELEG5273 Electronic Packaging (Irregular) An introductory treatment of electronic packaging, from single chip to multichip, including materials, substrates, electrical design, thermal design, mechanical design, package modeling and simulation, and processing considerations. Credit cannot be earned for both MEEG 5273 and ELEG 5273. Prerequisite: (ELEG 3213 or ELEG 3913) and MATH 3404. (Same as MEEG 5273)

ELEG5283 Mixed Signal Test Engineering II (Irregular) Focus calibrations, DAC testing, ADC testing, DIB design, Design for Test, Data Analysis, and Test Economics. Prerequisite: ELEG 4283.

ELEG5293L Integrated Circuits Fabrication Laboratory (Irregular) Experimental studies of silicon oxidation, solid-state diffusion, photolithographical materials and techniques, bonding and encapsulation. Fabrication and testing of PN diodes, NPN transistors and MOS transistors. Prerequisite: ELEG 5213.

ELEG5313 Power Semiconductor Devices (Irregular) Carrier transport physics; breakdown phenomenon in semiconductor devices; power bipolar transistors, thyristors, power junction field-effect transistors, power field-controlled diodes, power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, and power MOS-bipolar devices. Prerequisite: ELEG 4203.

ELEG5323 Semiconductor Nanostructures I (Irregular) This course is focused on the basic theoretical and experimental analyses of low dimensional systems encountered in semiconductor heterojunctions and nanostructures with the emphasis on device applications and innovations. Prerequisite: ELEG 4203 or instructor permission.

ELEG5333 Semiconductor Nanostructures II (Irregular) This course is a continuation of ELEG 5323 Semiconductors Nanostructures I. It is focused on the transport properties, growth, electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures, and optoelectronic devices. Prerequisite: ELEG 5323 or instructor permission.

ELEG5403 Systems Theory (Irregular) A unified state-space approach to continuous and discrete systems. System dynamics, local transition functions, reachability, observability, and global behavior of systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403.

ELEG5423 Optimal Control Systems (Irregular) Basic concepts, conditions for optimality, the minimum principle, the Hamilton Jacobi equation, structure and properties of optimal systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403.

ELEG5433 Digital Control Systems (Irregular) Signal processing in continuous-discrete systems. System modeling using the z-transform and state-variable techniques. Analysis and design of digital control systems. Digital redesign for continuous control. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403.

ELEG5443 Nonlinear Systems Analysis and Control (Irregular) Second-order nonlinear systems. Nonlinear differential equations. Approximate analysis methods. Lyapunov and input-output stability. Design of controllers, observers, and estimators for nonlinear systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 4403 or MATH 5303.

ELEG5453 Adaptive Filtering and Control (Irregular) Models for deterministic systems. Parameter estimation. Adaptive control. Stochastic models. Stochastic state and parameter estimation. Adaptive control of stochastic systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 3143 and ELEG 4403.

ELEG5513 Electric Power Quality (Irregular) The theory and analysis of electric power quality for industrial and commercial power systems. Specific topics include: grounding, shielding, wiring considerations, instrumentation, site surveys and analysis, case studies, specification and selection of power system components, and recommended design and installation practice. Prerequisite: ELEG 3303 and MATH 3404.

ELEG5533 Power Electronics and Motor Drives (Irregular) V-1 characteristics of insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) and MOS-controlled Thyristors (MCTs), design of driver and snubber circuits, induction-, permanent magnet-, and brushless dc-motor drives; and resonant inverters. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or (ELEG 3223 and ELEG 3303).

ELEG5613 Introduction to Telecommunications (Irregular) Overview of public and private telecommunication systems; traffic engineering; communications systems basics, information technology, electromagnetics, and data transmission. Prerequisite: ELEG Graduate Standing or ELEG 3133. (Same as CSCE 5613)

ELEG5653 Artificial Neural Networks (Irregular) Fundamentals of artificial neural networks, both theory and practice. Teaches basic concepts of both supervised and unsupervised learning, and how they are implemented using artificial neural networks. Topics include the perceptron, back propagation, the competitive Hamming net, self organizing feature maps, topological considerations, requirements for effective generalization, subpattern analysis, etc. Prerequisite: MATH 3403.

ELEG5693 Wireless Communications (Irregular) Comprehensive course in fast developing field of wireless mobile/cellular personal telecommunications. Topics include cellular system structures, mobile radio propagation channels, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ELEG5713 Antennas and Radiation (Irregular) Radio frequency antennas, control of radiation patterns, antenna impedance and antenna feeding systems. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG5723 Advanced Microwave Design (Irregular) This course is an advanced course in microwave design building on the introduction to microwave design course. A detailed discussion of active devices, biasing networks, mixers, detectors, Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuits (MMIC), and wideband matching networks will be provided. In addition, a number of advanced circuits will be analyzed. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703 and ELEG 4723.

ELEG5763 Advanced Electromagnetic Scattering & Transmission (Irregular) Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves from a flat interface, the Poynting theorem, the complex and average power, the rectangular wave guides, TE and TM modes, radiation from antennas in free space and introduction to computational electromagnetics. Prerequisite: ELEG 3703.

ELEG5773 Electronic Response of Biological Tissues (Irregular) Understand the electric and magnetic response of biological tissues with particular reference to neural and cardiovascular systems. Passive and active forms of electric signals in cell communication. We will develop the central electrical mechanisms from the membrane channel to the organ, building on those that are common to many electrically active cells in the body. Analysis of Nernst equation, Goldman equation, linear cable theory, and Hodgkin-Huxley Model of action potential generation and propagation. High frequency response of tissues to microwave excitation, dielectric models for tissue behavior, Debye, Cole-Cole models. Role of bound and free water on tissue properties. Magnetic response of tissues. Experimental methods to measure tissue response. Applications to Electrocardiography & Electroencephalography, Microwave Medical Imaging, RF Ablation will be discussed. Students may not receive credit for both ELEG 4773 and ELEG 5773. Prerequisite: MATH 3404, ELEG 3703 or PHYS 3414, BIOL 2533 or equivalent (Same as BENG 5283)

ELEG5801 Graduate Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) Papers presented by candidates for the Master of Science degree in electrical engineering on design problems, or new developments in the field of electrical engineering.

ELEG587V Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current electrical engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ELEG588V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Opportunity for individual study of advanced subjects related to a graduate electrical engineering program to suit individual requirements. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ELEG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ELEG6273 Advanced Electronic Packaging (Irregular) An advanced treatment of electronic packaging covering a diverse range of packaging applications. Topics include packaging tradeoffs and decisions, design and CAD, assembly single-chip packaging, discrete and integrated passives, MEMS and optoelectronic packaging, RF and microwave packaging, multichip packaging, reliability, and economic considerations. Prerequisite: ELEG 5273. (Same as MEEG 6273)

ELEG6801 Graduate Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) Papers presented by candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in electrical engineering on current research or design problems in the field of electrical engineering.

ELEG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)

(ENDY) Environmental Dynamics

ENDY5033 Advanced Vector Geographic Information Systems (Irregular) Advanced vector operations and analysis. Topics will include topological analysis, network analysis, geocoding, conflation, implications of source and product map scale, map generalization, error mapping, and cartographic production. Prerequisite: ANTH 4563 or GEOS 4583 or equivalent. (Same as ANTH 5043,GEOS 5033)

ENDY5043 GIS Analysis and Modeling (Odd years, Sp) Advanced raster topics are examined with a theoretical and methodological review of Tomlin's cartographic modeling principles. Topics vary and include fourier methods, image processing, kriging, spatial statistics, principal components, fuzzy and regression modeling, and multi-criteria decision models. Several raster GIS programs are examined with links to statistical analysis software. Prerequisite: (ANTH 4553 or GEOG 4553) or equivalent.

ENDY5053 Quaternary Environments (Fa) An interdisciplinary study of the Quaternary Period including dating methods, deposits soils, climates, tectonics and human adaptations. (Same as ANTH 5053,GEOS 5053)

ENDY5063 Climate Through Time (Sp) The earth's climate history over the last 2 million years and the influence various factors have had on it; compilation and paleoclimatic histories and methods of dating climatic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 4363 or equivalent. (Same as BIOL 5063,GEOS 5063)

ENDY5113 Global Change (Fa) Examines central issues of global change including natural and human induced climate change, air pollution, deforestation, desertification, wetland loss urbanization, and the biodiversity crisis. The U.S. Global Change Research Program is also examined. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as GEOG 5113)

ENDY5153 Environmental Site Assessment (Irregular) Principles, problems, and methods related to conducting an environmental site assessment. An applied course covering field site assessment, regulatory documentation, and report preparation. Prerequisite: GEOL 4033. (Same as GEOL 5153)

ENDY5853 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry (Sp) Introduction to principles of isotope fractionation and distribution in geological environments isotopic analytical methods, and extraction of isotope samples; application of isotopes in characterization of geologic processes and interaction with hydrologic, surficial, and biologic attenuation, paleothermometry soil and biochemical processes. Prerequisite: GEOL 5063 or GEOL 5263. (Same as GEOS 5853)

ENDY6013 Environmental Dynamics (Irregular) Required course for ENDY doctoral candidates. Overview of Earth Systems: Lithosphere; Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere, Cryosphere, and human interaction across Earth systems. Emphasis on understanding of processes within Earth systems and interactions across Earth Systems as they pertain to global self-regulation, secular variation, climate stability, development and sustainability of human societies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENDY6023 Seminar in Environmental Dynamics (Irregular) Seminar examining specific contemporary topic of topics in Environmental Dynamics. Topics will change with each offering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENDY602V Current Topics Seminar (Irregular) (1-2) Various aspects of the environment will be explored through topic specific seminars. Subject matter will change each semester addressing current environmental issues and research. Seminars will be one or two hours credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENDY6033 Society and Environment (Sp) This course examines the complex interrelationships between human societies and the natural environment. Drawing on diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in archaeology, ethnography, history, geography, and palaeo-environmental studies, readings and discussion will explore the co-production of social and environmental systems over time. (Same as ANTH 6033)

ENDY689V Special Problems in Environmental Dynamics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Independent study of a topic related to environmental dynamics under the guidance of an ENDY faculty member. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENDY6991 Environmental Dynamics Colloquium (Sp, Fa) Weekly meetings for discussion of current research in environmental dynamics. Graduate students must register for colloquium each semester. Colloquium credit does not count towards minimum hours required for the doctorate. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENDY700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

(ENGL) English

ENGL0003 Basic Writing (Sp, Su, Fa) A required course for first-time entering freshmen with ACT English scores lower than 19 or SAT verbal scores lower than 470. These students must successfully complete the course prior to enrolling in ENGL 1013, but other students may wish to take it as a review. Upon the recommendation of the Department of English, students may possibly be exempted from this course and transferred to ENGL 1013 as the result of further testing during the first week of classes. Credit earned in this course may not be applied to the total required for a degree.

ENGL0013 Reading Strategies for College Students (Sp, Su, Fa) The course focuses on developing reading and learning skills and strategies essential for college success with frequent application to college textbooks in a variety of disciplines. University credit is earned, but the course does not count toward a degree. Required of students not meeting U of A reading placement standards.

ENGL1013 Composition I (Sp, Su, Fa) Required of all freshmen unless exempted by the Department of English. Prerequisite is an acceptable score on the English section of the ACT or on another approved test or ENGL 0003. Prerequisite: ENGL 0003 or an acceptable score on the English section of the ACT or another approved test.

ENGL1013H Honors Composition I (Fa) A course for freshmen with high placement scores.

ENGL1023 Composition II (Sp, Su, Fa) Continuation of ENGL 1013.

ENGL1023 Technical Composition II (Sp, Su, Fa) Continuation of ENGL 1013.

ENGL1023H Honors Composition II (Sp) Continuation of ENGL 1013H.

ENGL1213 Introduction to Literature (Fa) Approaches to reading and writing about fiction, drama, and poetry at the college level.

ENGL2003 Advanced Composition (Sp, Su, Fa) Review course in English composition. Required of all candidates for bachelor's degree unless exempted by examination or by credit in ENGL 2013 or by a grade of at least a "B" in ENGL 1013 and a grade of "A" in ENGL 1023 at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Not to be taken before the second semester of the sophomore year; must be taken prior to the last semester before graduation. Cannot be counted toward a major in English. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2013 Essay Writing (Sp, Su) Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2023 Creative Writing I (Sp, Fa) Beginning level workshop course in which students write original poems and stories. Reading and detailed discussion of poems and stories in anthologies is required. Designed to teach the student the fundamental techniques of fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2173 Literacy in America (Odd years, Fa) A course that examines the myriad definitions of literacy (and illiteracy) and their connections to issues of social class, occupational status, economic and political structures, educational institutions, cultural organizations, and the media.

ENGL2303 Survey of English Literature from the Beginning through the 17th Century (Sp, Fa) A critical and historical survey of the development of literature in the British Isles from its beginnings to the end of the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2313 Survey of English Literature from 1700 to 1900 (Sp, Fa) A critical and historical survey of the development of literature in the British Isles from 1700 to 1900. Prerequisites: ENG: 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2323 Survey of Modern British, Irish, and Postcolonial Literature (Sp, Fa) A survey of modern literature in English written in Great Britain, Ireland, Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2343 Survey of American Literature from the Colonial Period through Naturalism (Sp, Fa) A survey of major American writers from the colonial period to 1900. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL2353 Survey of Modern American Literature (Sp, Fa) A survey of American writers after 1900. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023.

ENGL3013 Creative Writing II (Sp, Fa) Laboratory course for students who wish to attempt original work in the various literary forms. Prerequisite: ENGL 2023 or equivalent.

ENGL3053 Technical and Report Writing (Sp, Fa) Intensive practice in such types of writing as processes, descriptions of mechanism, abstracts, and laboratory and research reports. The criteria for effective written exposition in the scientific areas, including agriculture and engineering. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 and ENGL 1023 or equivalent.

ENGL3113 Folklore (Irregular) Popular literature (ballads, folktales, etc.). Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ENGL3123 Folk and Popular Music Traditions (Irregular) Introduction to folk and popular music studies. Emphasis on American traditions.

ENGL3143 Language and Expressive Culture (Irregular) This course explores the complex interrelationship of language, culture, and social identity. Verbal art and expressive culture are examined from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Topics include ethnographies of speaking, discourse analysis, cultural performances, and the performative aspects of oral expression. (Same as ANTH 3143,COMM 3143)

ENGL3173 Introduction to Linguistics (Irregular) Introduction to language study with stress upon modern linguistic theory and analysis. Data drawn from various languages reveal linguistic universals as well as phonological, syntactic, and semantic systems of individual languages. Related topics: language history, dialectology, language and its relation to culture and society, the history of linguistic scholarship. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3173,COMM 3173,WLLC 3173)

ENGL3193 History of the English Language (Fa) Introduction to the English language and its vocabulary from Anglo-Saxon times to the present.

ENGL3203 Poetry (Sp, Fa) A critical introduction to the genre.

ENGL3213 Fiction (Sp, Fa) A critical introduction to the genre.

ENGL3223 Drama (Sp) A critical introduction to the genre.

ENGL3283 Topics in Popular Culture and Popular Genres (Irregular) Survey of a broad topical area in popular culture and popular genres, such as science fiction or detective fiction. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3333 British Short Story (Irregular) Survey of the British short story in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with emphasis on the major writers.

ENGL3433 Introduction to Chaucer (Irregular) Course designed primarily for undergraduates. Extensive reading in Chaucer's major works.

ENGL3623 The Bible as Literature (Irregular) The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms. (Same as WLIT 3623)

ENGL3713 Topics in Medieval Literature and Culture (Irregular) Study of the languages, literature and civilization of the British Isles from approximately 500-1500 CE (including Old English, Middle English, Celtic, Anglo-Norman and Scandinavian). Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3723 Topics in Renaissance Literature and Culture (Irregular) The study of literary works of the English Renaissance, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Course content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3733 Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (Irregular) The study of Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3743 Topics in 19th-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) The study of literature of the 19th century, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical movements, or other organizing principles. Course content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3753 Topics in Modern British Literature (Irregular) This course focuses on the literature and culture of a specific period of time within the twentieth century, or on more broadly conceived topics that might organize the century as a whole. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3763 Topics in Postcolonial Literature and Culture (Irregular) Survey of a broad topical area related to postcolonial literature and culture. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3833 Topics in American Literature and Culture to 1900 (Irregular) The study of American literature and culture to 1900, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3843 Topics in Modern American Literature and Culture (Irregular) The study of a special topic in the field of modern American literature and culture. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3853 Topics in African-American Literature and Culture (Irregular) The study of works of African-American literature, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3863 Topics in Literature and Culture of the American South (Irregular) The study of works of literature of the American South, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3903 Special Topics (Irregular) Survey of a broad topical area related to literature and culture but not otherwise encompassed by the curriculum. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue. Offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: honor candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in English).

ENGL399VH Honors Course (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4003 English Language and Composition for Teachers (Fa) Subject matter and methods of approach for the teaching of composition in high school.

ENGL4013 Undergraduate Poetry Workshop (Irregular) Gives close attention to individual manuscripts in a workshop environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 3013 or equivalent.

ENGL4023 Undergraduate Fiction Workshop (Irregular) Gives close attention to individual manuscripts in a workshop environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 3013 or equivalent.

ENGL4073 Film Writing Workshop (Irregular) A workshop in writing the screenplay with close attention given to student manuscripts and adaptations. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

ENGL4113 Undergraduate Independent Study (Irregular) Undergraduate original research and writing. Prerequisite: 'B' average and two-thirds (21 hours or regular requirements for English major completed). May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4143 American Film Survey (Irregular) A survey of major American genres, major directors, and films that have influenced the development of motion pictures. (Same as COMM 4143)

ENGL4213 Senior Research Seminar (Irregular) Seminar on a topic in literature in English with a substantial research paper required. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4303 Introduction to Shakespeare (Sp, Su, Fa) Extensive reading in Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and nondramatic poetry.

ENGL4503 Introduction to Literary Theory (Irregular) A historical survey of literary theory from Plato onwards.

ENGL4513 Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory (Irregular) A survey of contemporary trends in literary criticism. Emphasis will be placed on engaging the practices of a particular theory. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4533 Studies in Literature and Gender (Irregular) The study of a special topic involving literature and gender. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4543 Studies in Literature and Multiculturalism (Irregular) The study of literature and multiculturalism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. At least one major paper will be required. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4563 Topics in Major Authors (Irregular) The concentrated study of works by one or more major authors. At least one major paper will be required. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4573 Studies in Major Literary Movements (Irregular) This course focuses on the literature either of a major literary movement such as Romanticism or Modernism, or of a more specific topic such as Utopianism in twentieth-century writing. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4603 Special Studies (Irregular) Concentrated study of a specific topical area related to literature and culture but not otherwise encompassed by the curriculum. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ENGL4603H Honors Special Studies (Irregular) Concentrated study of a specific topical area related to literature and culture but not otherwise encompassed by the curriculum. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ENGL498V Senior Thesis (Irregular) (1-6)

ENGL5003 Composition Pedagogy (Fa) Introduction to teaching college composition. Designed for graduate assistants at the University of Arkansas.

ENGL5013 Creative Writing Workshop (Irregular)

ENGL5023 Writing Workshop: Fiction (Irregular)

ENGL5033 Writing Workshop: Poetry (Irregular)

ENGL5043 Translation Workshop (Irregular) Problems of translation and the role of the translator as both scholar and creative writer; involves primarily the discussion in workshop of the translations of poetry, drama, and fiction done by the students, some emphasis upon comparative studies of existing translations of well-known works. Primary material will vary. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of a foreign language. (Same as WLLC 504V) May be repeated for up to 15 hours of degree credit.

ENGL507V Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (Irregular) (1-3) The theory and practice of the "New Journalism" with a study of its antecedents and special attention to the use of "fictional" techniques and narrator point of view to make more vivid the account of real people and real events.

ENGL5083 Professing Literature (Irregular) An introduction to the profession of literary scholarship and the teaching of literature at the college level.

ENGL510V Readings in English and American Literature (Irregular) (1-6) Open to Honors candidates and graduate students.

ENGL5173 Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5183 The Structure of Present English (Sp) Structural analysis of the language.

ENGL5203 Introduction to Graduate Studies (Irregular) Students learn to carry out and report on literary research. Practical assignments introduce them to the reference collections, professional journals, and microform texts with which scholars work. Meanwhile, advanced explication and composition exercises work on perfecting the students' control over the design and style of the articles they write.

ENGL5223 Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5233 Form and Theory of Translation (Irregular) An examination of the principal challenges that confront translators of literature, including the recreation of style, dialect, ambiguities, and formal poetry; vertical translation; translation where multiple manuscripts exist; and the question of how literal a translation should be.

ENGL5243 Special Topics (Irregular) Designed to cover subject matter not offered in other courses.

ENGL5263 Form and Theory of Fiction: I (Irregular) Such aspects of the genre as scene, transition, character, and conflict. Discussion is limited to the novel.

ENGL5273 Form and Theory of Poetry: I (Irregular) An examination of perception, diction, form, irony, resolution, and the critical theories of the major writers on poetry, such as Dryden, Coleridge, and Arnold.

ENGL5283 Form and Theory of Fiction: II (Irregular) Second part of the study of the techniques of fiction. Discussion is limited to the short story. Prerequisite: ENGL 5263.

ENGL5293 Form and Theory of Poetry: II (Irregular) Second part of the study of the techniques of poetry; independent study of a poet or a problem in writing or criticism of poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 5273.

ENGL5303 Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5313 Introduction to Literary Theory (Irregular) An advanced introductory survey of a number of theoretical approaches to literature.

ENGL5403 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5603 World Literature and Culture in English (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5623 The Bible as Literature (Irregular) The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms. (Same as WLIT 5623)

ENGL5633 English Drama from Its Beginning to 1642 (Irregular) Early forms, Tudor drama, Shakespeare's contemporaries, and Stuart drama to the closing of the theatres.

ENGL5653 Shakespeare: Plays and Poems (Irregular)

ENGL569V Seminar in Film Studies (Irregular) (1-9) Research, discussion; papers on a variety of film genres and areas including the new American film, the science-fiction film, directors, film comedy, the experimental film, criticism, the film musical. (Same as COMM 569V) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5703 Studies in American Literature and Culture Before 1900 (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5723 Studies in Literature and Culture of the American South (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5803 Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5903 Studies in Twentieth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5923 Film and Media Studies (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5933 Studies in Popular Culture and Popular Genres (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5943 Studies in Criticism and Literary Theory (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5953 Studies in Literary History (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL5973 Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6113 Seminar in Medieval Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6203 Seminar in Renaissance Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6243 Seminar in Special Topics (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6443 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6513 Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6613 Seminar in World Literature and Culture in English (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6713 Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6723 Seminar in American Literature and Culture Before 1900 (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6733 Seminar in Literature and Culture of the American South (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6803 Seminar in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Culture (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6933 Seminar in Popular Culture and Popular Genres (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6943 Seminar in Literary Theory (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6953 Seminar in Literary History (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL6973 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular) Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL698V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ENGL699V Master of Fine Arts Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ENGL700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)

(ENSC) Environmental Science

ENSC1001L Environmental Science Laboratory (Fa) Laboratory, field trip, and discussion sessions covering the concepts and information allowing students to critically evaluate environmental issues. Topics will include: laboratory safety, recycling, composting, geographic information systems, soil testing, water quality, hazardous wastes, waste disposal, wetlands, wastewater treatment, and sustainable food systems. Laboratory 2 hours/week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENSC 1003.

ENSC1003 Environmental Science (Fa) Series of lectures and discussions introducing the topic of environmental science including factors related to water, soil, and air quality. May not be taken for natural science credit by students in Fulbright College.

ENSC3003 Introduction to Water Science (Fa) Properties, occurrence, and description of the types, functions, quality and quantity, potential contaminants, uses, and guiding policies and regulations of the various water resources in the environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 1023 and ENSC 1003 or CHEM 1053 or higher or GEOL 1113 or higher or BIOL 1543.

ENSC3103 Plants and Environmental Restoration (Odd years, Fa) Selection, establishment, and use of plants to promote soil stabilization, water quality, and wildlife habitat. Principles and practices of managing plants for soil remediation, nutrient and sediment trapping, and restoration of plant communities. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or HORT 2003 or BIOL 1613.

ENSC3221L Ecosystems Assessment Laboratory (Even years, Fa) The purpose of this laboratory is to complement concepts learned in lecture by carrying out experiments that familiarize students with methods used in soil and aquatic ecology. Students will collect samples, analyze and interpret data obtained from soil and water samples. Lab will meet once per week for 3 hours. Corequisite: ENSC 3223.

ENSC3223 Ecosystems Assessment (Even years, Fa) Application of ecological principles for ESWS majors and college students interested in environmental science. Applications of the basic ecological principles of organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems to gain an appreciation for how large scale patterns in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are influenced by small scale interactions among individuals (microorganisms to invertebrate macrofauna) and between individuals and their local environment. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: ENSC 3221L. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543, CSES 2203, and ENSC 3003.

ENSC3263 Environmental Soil and Water Conservation (Sp) Effect of land use on water quality. Major sources of agricultural nonpoint pollutants. Best management practices used to minimize water quality impacts. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

ENSC3413 Principles of Environmental Economics (Sp) An introductory, issues-oriented course in the economics of the environment. What is involved in society making decisions about environmental quality will be studied. Environmental issues important to the State of Arkansas and the United States will be emphasized. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023. (Same as AGEC 3413)

ENSC3603 GIS for Environmental Science (Odd Years, Sp) Provide instruction on the uses of GIS techniques in solving practical environmental and agricultural land use problems. Areas include: 1) an introduction to spatial variability in soils with an emphasis on the application of GIS techniques to map and understand spatial parameters important to different land uses, and 2) development of individual experience in the use of GIS in solving environmental and agricultural problems using an oral and written term project. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

ENSC3933 Environmental Ethics (Odd years, Sp) The course addresses ethical questions about nature and the natural environment. Topics of discussion include anthropocentric and biocentric ethics, population control, obligations to future generations, animal rights, moral considerability, Leopold's land ethic, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Lecture/discussions 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENSC 1003 or PHIL 2003 or PHIL 2103.

ENSC400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Work on special problems in environmental science or related fields. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

ENSC4023 Water Quality (Fa) Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of natural waters (rain, river, lake, soil, ground, etc.). Discussion of water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity and acidity, redox, hardness, BOD, TSS, etc. Aquatic processes of pollutants and principles of modeling. Laboratory experiments in water sampling, measurement of water quality parameters, and instrumentation. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

ENSC4034 Analysis of Environmental Contaminants (Even years, Sp) Methods of analysis for inorganic and organic contaminants, radionuclides and microorganisms in soil and water. Quality assurance and quality control, sampling protocols, sample handling, instrumentation and data analysis. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 4 hours per week. Co-Requisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203 and ENSC 3003.

ENSC404V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Studies of selected topics in environmental sciences not available in other courses. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENSC4263 Environmental Soil Science (Even years, Sp) Study of the behavior of pesticides, toxic organic compounds, metals, nutrients, and pathogenic microorganisms in the soil/plant/water continuum. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CSES 3214.

(ENTO) Entomology

ENTO1023 Insects and People (Sp) Appreciation of the insects and their roles in nature and in civilization for students not required to take ENTO 3013. Biological, historical, social economic, cultural, and medical aspects of insects are discussed. Emphasizes appreciation of entomology and employs many visual aids. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENTO1031L Field and Laboratory Studies in Entomology (Sp) A systematic survey and identification of insects and other arthropods occurring in woodland, aquatic and agricultural environments with emphasis on identification and observation of insects in their natural settings. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: ENTO 1023.

ENTO3013 Introduction to Entomology (Fa) Fundamentals of structure, function, biology and identification of insects; typical procedures in control of representative species. Insect collection required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours a week. Suggested prerequisites: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4)

ENTO4013 Insect Behavior and Chemical Ecology (Even years, Sp) Basic concepts in insect senses and patterns of behavioral responses to various environmental stimuli. Previous knowledge of basic entomology is helpful, but not required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory/discussion 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component

ENTO4024 Insect Diversity and Taxonomy (Even years, Fa) Principles and practices of insect classification and identification with emphasis on adult insects. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: ENTO 3013.

ENTO4043 Apiculture (Odd years, Sp) Review of social behavior of insects and its exemplification in Honeybees. Previous knowledge of basic entomology is helpful but not required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO4053 Insect Ecology (Even years, Fa) To develop understanding of important ecological concepts through study of dynamic relationships among insects and their environment. To become familiar with the literature of insect ecology, and interpretation and critique of ecological research. Previous knowledge of basic entomology and/or ecology will be assumed. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO410V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Special Topics course available to both undergraduate and graduate students, to address emerging issues and timely topics. This would supplement our graduate-only special topics course.

ENTO4123 Insect Pest Management (Odd years, Sp) Study of principles and concept of insect pest management. Areas covered include survey of arthropod pests and damage, population dynamics, damage thresholds, physcological units, prediction models, surveillance, arthropod sampling, strategies and tactics utilized to maintain pest populations below economic injury levels. Prerequisite: ENTO 3013.

ENTO4133 Advanced Applied Entomology (Even years, Sp) Biology and ecology of major arthropod pests as model applied management systems. Activities include independent study, literature review and group discussions. Knowledge of general entomology and pest management is required. Self-learning modules are available. Lecture 2 hours/week and direct self study laboratory 2 hours/week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequistie: ENTO 3013.

ENTO462V Internship (Irregular) (3-6) Supervised practical work experience in pest management to develop and demonstrate professional competence. A maximum of 6 hours credit per semester or summer session is permitted. Faculty approval of projects proposal prior to enrollment, and written or oral reports are required.

ENTO500V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

ENTO5013 Morphology of Insects (Odd years, Fa) Origin, evolution, and functional significance of external insect structure. Structure and function of major internal systems. Previous knowledge of basic entomology is helpful, but not required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO511V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in entomology. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ENTO5123 Biological Control (Even years, Fa) Theoretical and practical basis for biological control of arthropod pests and weeds via parasites, predators, and pathogens. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO5133 Applied Molecular Genetics (Even years, Sp) A hands on course in applied molecular genetic techniques used in agricultural research including molecular diagnostics and population genetics. Students will learn how to apply advanced molecular genetic methodologies and Internet database resources to the organism that they are using for their graduate research. Prerequisite: ANSC 3123.

ENTO600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ENTO6071 Seminar (Sp, Fa) Fall: special topics not covered in regular course work. Spring: critical review of research papers in entomology. Seminar will be taken by graduate student majors for both semesters. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENTO6113 Insect Physiology (Even years, Sp) General and comparative physiology of insects. Previous knowledge of basic entomology is helpful, but not required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO6213 Insect Toxicology (Odd years, Fa) Toxicology of chemicals to insects and humans including techniques of testing collecting data, and factors that influence reactions to different classes of insecticides. Previous knowledge of organic physiological chemistry is helpful, but not required. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

ENTO700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: graduate standing.

(ESRM) Educational Statistics & Research Methods

ESRM5013 Research Methods in Education (Sp, Su, Fa) General orientation course which considers the nature of research problems in education and the techniques used by investigators in solving those problems. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ESRM5393 Statistics in Education and Health Professions (Sp, Su, Fa) Applied statistics course for Master's degree candidates. Includes concepts and operations for frequency distributions, graphing techniques, measures of central tendency and variation, sampling, hypothesis testing, and interpretation of statistical results.

ESRM5653 Educational Assessment (Irregular) Introduction to measurement issues and basic test theory. Focus on types and usage of assessment tools, data management, and analysis and interpretation of educational data. Practical training in the utilization and interpretation of academic achievement data in Arkansas.

ESRM600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ESRM605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ESRM6403 Educational Statistics and Data Processing (Sp, Su, Fa) Theory and application of frequency distributions, graphical methods, central tendency, variability, simple regression and correlation indexes, chi-square, sampling, and parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Use of the computer for the organization, reduction, and analysis of data (required of doctoral candidates). Prerequisite: ESRM 5013 or equivalent.

ESRM6413 Experimental Design in Education (Sp) Principles of experimental design as applied to educational situations. Special emphasis on analysis of variance techniques used in educational research. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403 or equivalent.

ESRM6423 Multiple Regression Techniques for Education (Fa) Introduction to multiple regression procedures for analyzing data as applied in educational settings, including multicollearity, dummy variables, analysis of covariance, curvi-linear regression, and path analysis. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403.

ESRM6453 Applied Multivariate Statistics (Sp) Multivariate statistical procedures as applied to educational research settings including discriminant analysis, principal components analysis, factor analysis, canonical correlation, and cluster analysis. Emphasis on use of existing computer statistical packages. Prerequisite: ESRM 6413.

ESRM6513 Advanced Experimental Design (Irregular) Advanced topics of the general linear model, including hierarchical linear modeling and longitudinal analysis with a focus on developing the mathematical and theoretical basis for these methods. Prerequisite: ESRM 6413.

ESRM6523 Advanced Multiple Regression (Irregular) Advanced topics of correlational research methods, including logistic regression and path analysis with a focus on developing the mathematical and theoretical basis for these advanced methodological designs. Prerequisite: ESRM 6423.

ESRM6533 Qualitative Research (Sp, Fa) Introduction of non-quantitative methods, including data collection through interviews, field observation, records research, internal and external validity problems in qualitative research. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403.

ESRM6543 Advanced Qualitative Research (Sp) Preparation for the conduct of qualitative research, structuring, literature reviews, data collection and analysis, and reporting results. Prerequisite: ESRM 6533. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ESRM6553 Advanced Multivariate Statistics (Irregular) Builds on the foundation provided in Multivariate and introduces techniques that extend methodological elements of canonical, discriminant, factor analytic, and longitudinal analyses, providing the mathematical and theoretical foundations necessary for these designs. Prerequisite: ESRM 6453.

ESRM6613 Evaluation of Policies, Programs, and Projects (Fa) Introduction to evaluation in social science research, including why and how evaluations of programs, projects, and policies are conducted; includes analysis of actual evaluations in a variety of disciplines. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403. (Same as EDRE 6213)

ESRM6623 Techniques of Research in Education (Sp, Su) Use of scientific method in attacking educational problems. Emphasis placed on the planning and design of research studies, collection of reliable and valid data, sampling methods, and analysis and interpretation of data. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403.

ESRM6653 Measurement and Evaluation (Irregular) Fundamentals of measurement: scales, scores, norms, reliability, validity. Test and scale construction and item analysis. Standardized measures and program evaluation models in decision making. Prerequisite: ESRM 6403.

ESRM668V Practicum in Research (Irregular) (1-6) Practical experience in educational research on campus, in school systems, or in other agencies in educational program development.

ESRM699V Seminar (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: advanced graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ESRM700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(ETEC) Educational Technology

ETEC2001 Educational Technology (Sp, Su, Fa) A criterion-based course designed to provide beginning technology users with conceptual knowledge and skills in the area of fundamental computer technology and traditional educational media. Grades are determined by total points earned on successful completion of identified course projects, unit quizzes, and a proficiency final examination. Corequisite: ETEC 2002L

ETEC2002L Educational Technology Lab (Sp, Su, Fa) Computer lab exercises and projects appropriate to Educational Technology. Student enrolling in ETEC 2002L must also enroll in ETEC 2001. Corequisite: ETEC 2001

ETEC5062 Teaching and Learning with Computer-based Technologies (Su) Provides students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program with the information and experience needed to use computer-based teaching technologies to meet instructional objectives in content area classrooms. Prerequisite: ETEC 2003.

ETEC5183 Internet in the K-12 Classroom (Irregular) This course prepares teachers to be informed consumers of Internet technology; plan appropriate and effective Internet activities for their learners; and understand their responsibilities regarding electronic media, communications, and the Internet in the classroom. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ETEC5213 Introduction to Educational Media (Sp, Su, Fa) Instruction in selecting, utilizing and evaluating instructional materials and equipment. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ETEC5243 Instructional Design Theory & Models (Fa) A study of the instructional development process as it pertains to the design and production of instructional materials which use modern technologies. Goal analysis, objectives, evaluation, instructional strategy development, production of an educational product, and revision of the instructional materials are considered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ETEC5253 Information Technologies (Irregular) Students perform intensive examinations of the role of new technologies and their implications for instructional practice. Emphasis is on identification and evaluation of new technologies in instructional environments. Establishing and maintaining learning environments, exploring selected theories and concepts, assessing potential uses of IT, and utilization of new technologies will occur.

ETEC5263 Grant Writing in Instructional Technology (Sp, Su, Fa) Students will have an opportunity to find grant funding sources, write a grant, and submit an actual grant proposal to an agency for consideration. Will survey research in instructional medial over the past 60 years and learn specific criteria for reading and evaluating research reports and articles. Will investigate current issues and topics related to research and grant writing in instructional media.

ETEC5283 Field Experiences in Educational Technology (Sp, Su, Fa) Field experience in educational technology settings. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 6 hours of graduate work in educational technology.

ETEC5303 Learning with Computers in K-12 Classrooms (Irregular) Students learn how technology can be used to support K-12 classroom environments. Various learning theories and technologies will be explored and projects will be developed that utilize technologies and current learning theories in K-12 settings. Emphasis is on identification, evaluation, and the effective use of technologies to support classroom environments. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ETEC5313 Principles in Visual Literacy (Irregular) Students gain understanding of visual literacy research and learn to create graphics that support learning. Literature in the area of visual literacy and learning theories as well as tools that facilitate effective visual literacy will be used to create visuals that are clear, communicate well, and help enhance learner performance.

ETEC5363 Distance Learning (Irregular) This course covers important aspects of the distance learning, course design and teaching. The course will link theory to practice by investigating theory and examining research that undergrads practice, examining and analyzing current practice, proposing practice standards, and discussing issues related to learners in distance education environments. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ETEC5373 Web Design (Irregular) Students design, create, and analyze Web sites by applying processes, standards and techniques used to identify target audience; ensure compliance with copyright and disability laws, measure effectiveness, and coordinate Web design. Topics include copyright and fair use, user and task analysis, usability, accessibility, testing, search engine optimization, and web analytics. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ETEC5743 Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) A supervised field placement in educational technology that provides experience consistent with the student's professional goals and training emphasis. Internship experiences are planning and directed under the guidance of a faculty member. On-campus and on-site supervision is required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ETEC5993 Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to enhance the established educational technology curriculum by providing students with special topic content and classroom experiences under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ETEC600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

ETEC6053 Special Problems in Educational Technology (Sp, Su, Fa) Individually designed and conducted studies of educational technology under the guidance of a faculty member. Negotiated learning contract with supervising faculty required before enrollment. On-campus supervision required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ETEC6223 Strategic Planning and IDT Programs (Sp, Su, Fa) The course offers readings and experiences intended to develop strategic planning knowledge, values, attitudes, and skills in future instructional design and technology leaders. Topics covered include strategic planning and leadership.

ETEC6393 Issues and Trends in Instructional Design and Technology (Irregular) Critical challenges posed as a result of the increasing infusion of technology into the school and training environments are explored. The course prepares students to make and defend policy decisions and become conversant with current trends and issues in the field. Prerequisite: ETEC 5213.

(EUST) European Studies

EUST2013 Introduction to Europe (Fa) This course will cover the basic physical and human geography of Europe, emphasizing the factors that tie Europe together as well as the diversity of environmental and cultural conditions in the region. The class will focus particularly on those countries that are current members of the EU and on possible future entrants.

EUST399VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EUST4003 European Studies Colloquium (Sp) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject of investigation, required of students in the European studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EUST4003H Honors European Studies Colloquium (Sp) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

EUST470V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) An examination of pertinent issues in Europe.

EUST470VH Honors Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) An examination of pertinent issues in Europe.

(EXED) Extension Education

EXED3023 An Introduction to the Cooperative Extension Service (Irregular) Development of the Extension Service as a part of the Land-Grant College system; organization, personnel and functions of the Extension Service in agriculture and human environmental sciences. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EXED4173 Principles of Extension Teaching (Irregular) An understanding of the principles of teaching and learning, selection, and use of teaching methods and materials with emphasis on the role of extension as a part of the community education system. Prerequisite: EXED 3023 and PSYC 2003.

EXED4183 Management of Volunteer Programs (Irregular) Recruiting, training, management, evaluation, and recognition of volunteers in agricultural-related agencies, non-profit organizations, community groups, and advisory committees. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EXED475V Internship in Extension (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) A supervised practical work experience in Cooperative Extension which is designed to give the student an insight into the role of Extension employees and an opportunity to gain professional competence in this area. Prerequisite: Junior standing and EXED 3023. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

EXED5113 Program Development and Evaluation (Irregular) Principles and proceedings of program development process including planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating of extension education programs. An emphasis on the framework for applying adult and non-formal education principles to the change process. Prerequisite: EXED 3023.

EXED5133 Extension Organization and Administration (Irregular) Program and personnel administration for planning and management of county extension programs. Emphasis will be given to organization, structures, principles, and theories of administration, personnel management, training and evaluation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(FDSC) Food Science

FDSC1011 Food Science Orientation (Fa) Introduces food science as a unique program offering exciting career opportunities. This course emphasizes the importance of science in processing and preservation of food and discusses current topics and issues. Provides sound, basic information on food constituents, additives, labeling, environmental issues, food regulations, and food safety. Lecture 2 hours per week for 8 weeks.

FDSC1103 Introduction to Food Science (Sp) This course is designed to provide students with a general application and understanding of current issues associated with food products and food ingredients. Discussions will focus on controversial subjects involving food products, food additives, food safety and preservation techniques based on scientific principles and popular belief. Lecture/discussions/demonstrations, 3 hours per week.

FDSC2503 Food Safety and Sanitation (Fa) Principles of sanitation, cleaners and sanitizers, sanitary equipment and plant design, and microbial growth and control in food processing operations. Lecture/discussion/demonstrations, 3 hours per week.

FDSC2523 Sanitation and Safety in Food Processing Operations (Even years, Sp) Topics to be covered include understanding and control of microbial, chemical, and physical food hazards as well as emerging food safety issues. Course will include a study of cleaners and sanitizers and sanitary equipment and plant designs. Bioterrorism and food safety will also be discussed. (On-line course)

FDSC3103 Principles of Food Processing (Even years, Fa) The course is designed as an overview of the unit; food processing operations common to all types of food processing plants. Examples will be drawn from international food processing operations processing fruits and vegetables, poultry and meats, and oil seeds and cereal grains. Emphasis on oral communication and critical thinking skills. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

FDSC3202 Introduction to Food Law (Even years, Sp) Discussion of government laws and regulations affecting the manufacture of food. Emphasis is on federal regulations relating to food safety, labeling, and the FDA. Discussion relates to practical use of food law. Lecture 2 hours per week.

FDSC3303 Principles of Food Processing (Even years, Fa) This web-based introductory course is designed as an overview of unit food processing operations common to all types of food processing plants. Examples will be drawn from national and international food processing operations processing: fruits, vegetables, poultry and meats, oil seeds and cereal grains. Emphasis is on student learning principles of food processing operations and includes strengthening students' written communications and critical thinking skills. Corequisite: lab component.

FDSC3753 Introduction to Food Engineering Principles (Sp) Web-based course designed to give students a perspective of how engineering principles are used in food processing. The student will be introduced to the application of food engineering principles to real-world food processing situations. Students will develop an understanding of the basics of units systems, mass balances, fluid rheology, fluid flow, heat transfer, and thermal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 1285 or equivalent and/or consent of instructor.

FDSC400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Investigation of assigned problems in food science. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

FDSC4114 Food Analysis (Even years, Sp) Methods of analysis, instrumentation, and laboratory techniques for measuring the chemical composition of raw and value-added products. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L or (CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L).

FDSC4124 Food Microbiology (Sp) Microbiology, contamination, preservation, and spoilage of different kinds of foods, food poisoning, sanitation, control, and inspection; microbiology of water; and standard methods for official food and public health laboratories. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BIOL 2013 and BIOL 2011L and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L. (Same as BIOL 4124)

FDSC4203 Quality Evaluation and Control (Even years, Fa) Definition of grades and standards of quality by chemical, physical, and sensory techniques. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

FDSC4304 Food Chemistry (Fa) Water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals in foods; biochemical and functional properties, enzymes, food additives (emulsifiers, pigments, colors, flavors, preservatives, and sweeteners) and texture as related to properties in food systems and during processing. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L or (CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L).

FDSC431V Internship in Food Science (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) The Food Science Internship is a supervised practical work experience with a food industry, research program or governmental agency to gain professional experience and insight into career opportunities. a maximum of 4 hours credit is allowed for degree credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent. For graduate credit, completion of first year of graduate studies and consent of major professor.

FDSC4413 Sensory Evaluation of Food (Odd years, Fa) Principles and procedures for sensory evaluation of food. Appropriate uses of specific tests are discussed, along with physiological, psychological, and environmental factors affecting sensory verdicts. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: STAT 2303 or WCOB 1033 or AGST 4023 or STAT 2023 or PSYC 2013.

FDSC4713 Food Product and Process Development (Odd years, Sp) Multidisciplinary approaches for developing new food products and processes; in the context of an industry-sponsored project. Group dynamics and interpersonal skills. Factors that influence product and process development. Analysis and modeling applied to food process design. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing, Food Science majors only or consent.

FDSC4754 Engineering Principles of Food Processing (Odd years, Sp) Basic mechanics of refrigeration, temperature controls, materials handling and mechanical problems as applied to foods and food processing. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 1213, PHYS 2013, and PHYS 2011L.

FDSC4823 Principles of Food Microbiology (Fa) This web-based course is a study of the fundamentals of food microbiology to include its history, classifications, spores and their importance, and the most common and serious pathogenic food microorganisms. Fermentation, spoilage microorganisms and control methodology are also discussed.

FDSC5001 Seminar (Sp, Fa) Presentation and discussion of graduate student research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FDSC509V Special Problems Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Original investigation on assigned problems in food science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FDSC5503 Safety and Sanitation for the Food Industry (Sp) This web-based course will provide an appreciation of the need for sanitation in food processing and increase the students' knowledge of sanitary techniques. Topics will include contamination sources, plant and equipment design, cleaners and sanitizers, HACCP, and food biosecurity. Also covered will be considerations in selecting, establishing and maintaining a sanitation program. Prerequisites: General Microbiology or Food Microbiology; General Chemistry.

FDSC5703 Fermented Foods (Odd years, Fa) Examination of factors influencing the fermentation of food and beverage, and methods to control the microbiological stability and quality of these products. Lecture/discussion 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813 and FDSC 4124.

FDSC600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FDSC602V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) Discussions focused on selected topics of particular fields of raw product physiology and food processing. chemistry, physiology, microbiology, evaluation, sensory analysis and preservation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FDSC6033 Food Biochemistry (Even years, Sp) Biochemical characteristics, functions, regulation and impact of components in raw and processed foods of plant origin. Lecture/discussion 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813.

FDSC6123 Food Carbohydrate Chemistry (Odd years, Sp) Focus is on carbohydrate chemistry including molecular structures and physical properties, production and food applications, analytical methods for food carbohydrates, and interactions among food polysaccharides. Prerequisite: FDSC 4304.

FDSC6133 Food Lipid Chemistry (Even years, Fa) Chemistry and technology of commercial fats and oils in food systems with discussion of lipid changes affecting food quality and human health. Prerequisite: FDSC 4304 and FDSC 4114.

FDSC6323 Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods (Even years, Sp) Course will include past, present and future of nutraceuticals and functional foods, chemistry, mechanism, novel technologies, nutrigenomics, processing, healthy lifestyle, regulation, safety, marketing, international aspects, and industry project. Prerequisite: CHEM 2613 (or CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3813 and FDSC 4304 or instructor consent.

FDSC6333 Food Protein Chemistry and Functionality (Odd years, Fa) This course is a study in advanced food protein chemistry, including molecular structures, characterization, physicochemical bases of food protein functionality, structure-function relationship, processing technologies to improve functionality, as well as hands-on experiences with timely, practical projects related to food proteins. Lecture and problem solving projects for 3 hours per week. Pre- or corequisite: FDSC 4304.

FDSC700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) The doctoral program in food science is an interdepartmental program offered by the departments of Food Science, Animal and Poultry Sciences, and Human Environmental Sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(FIIR) Fulbright Institute of International Relations

FIIR2813 Introduction to International Relations (Sp, Fa) Introduction to the international system, theories of international behavior, political economy, conflict and peacemaking, the third world, international law and organizations, and the nature of the post-Cold War world. (Same as PLSC 2813)

FIIR4003 International Relations Seminar (Fa) The capstone course in international relations involves intensive study of major global trends and issues. Students choose a research project culminating in a senior thesis to meet the College writing requirement. Prerequisite: FIIR 2813 or PLSC 2813.

(FINN) Finance

FINN1003 Your Money and Credit (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to personal finance. Topics include building wealth, do's and don'ts of credit, car and home ownership. Lectures on theory and concepts; 'learning from the masters' video on best practices; financial simulations and case exercises. Non-degree credit for business majors.

FINN3003 Personal Financial Management (Sp, Fa) Topics covered include budgeting, financial planning, managing credit, taxes, insurance, investments, and retirement planning.

FINN3013 Financial Analysis (Sp, Su, Fa) Focuses on how information contained in financial statements can be used in financial decision-making; in particular, to assess financial performance, evaluate credit and default risk, forecast future funds needs, weigh the risk-reward of debt vs. equity financing, and develop estimates of intrinsic value using relative valuation metrics and discounted cash flow methods. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043

FINN3053 Financial Markets and Institutions (Sp, Su, Fa) Role and operations of financial markets and institutions in the economy. Supply of, demand for, funds, interest rates and flow of funds analysis. Financial policies, practices of bank and nonbank financial institutions. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

FINN3063 Investments (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to basic investment concepts including: risk-return and mean-variance efficient frontiers, diversification and the pricing of risk, security valuation. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043 and FINN 3013.

FINN3103 Financial Modeling (Sp, Su, Fa) Develop strong computer skills in financial analysis by integrating conceptual material with spreadsheet-based numerical solution and simulation techniques. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043.

FINN3133 Commercial Banking (Sp, Fa) Commercial bank administration, management; loans; bond portfolios; credit analysis; public relations; analysis and interpretations of Federal Reserve regulations and publications. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043.

FINN3603 Corporate Finance (Sp, Su, Fa) Develop analytical competencies in financial planning, cost of capital estimation, application of discounted cash flow approach to valuation and capital allocation, lease analysis, evaluation of merger and organizational restructuring strategies. Prerequisite: WCOB 2043 and FINN 3013.

FINN3623 Risk Management (Sp, Fa) A survey of the extent and types of risk in business; ways of dealing with business risk; use of security and commodity exchanges; survey of insurance for risk bearing purposes.

FINN3703 International Finance (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduction to international financial markets, exchange rates and exchange rate determination, balance of trade measures, and vehicles for foreign trade financing.

FINN3933 Real Estate Principles (Sp, Su, Fa) Comprehensive, covering economics of real estate, real estate value, real estate finance, rights in real property and their transfer, public programs, policies relating to real property.

FINN4003H Honors Finance Colloquium (Irregular) Explores important concepts, significant events and/or new developments in the field of Finance. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

FINN4013 Seminar in Personal Financial Planning (Sp) Explores financial planning function, including contact, data acquisition, plan development and implementation; covers all areas of personal financial planning including investments, insurance, taxes, and estate planning; addresses planning techniques and financial planning ethical issues; emphasis on case studies. Pre- or Corequisite: FINN 4733. Prerequisite: FINN 3003, FINN 3063, FINN 3623, and ACCT 3843.

FINN410V Special Topics in Finance (Irregular) (1-6) Explore current events, new developments and special topics in Finance not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: FINN 3013. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

FINN4133 Advanced Investments (Sp, Fa) Sound training in the principles of security analysis and portfolio management and certain advanced techniques of financial management. Modern portfolio theory and its application to portfolio management practices will be emphasized. Prerequisite: FINN 3063.

FINN4143 Portfolio Management I (Fa) This course applies modern investment theory to the practical management of the Rebsament Trust. Students prepare a statement of investment objectives, recommend an asset allocation strategy based on a quantitative analysis of asset class returns, and select securities using fundamental analysis. Classes are organized as management meetings and visits to investment firms are an important part of the class. Selection is by invitation. Prerequisite: ACCT 3723 and FINN 3063 and by invitation only.

FINN4153 Portfolio Management II (Sp) This course is a continuation of FINN 4143. Topics covered include technical analysis, dynamic asset allocation and derivative strategies. Visits to major investments firms and organized exchanges in New York City or other locations are generally planned. Selection is by invitation. Prerequisite: FINN 4143.

FINN4163 Fixed Income Securities I (Fa) The markets and institutional settings of fixed income securities; valuation and risk analysis of money market and capital market instruments; strategies and management of bond portfolios; taxable and tax-exempt securities; U.S. and non-U.S. fixed income securities; term structure of interest rate; and interest rate derivatives as hedging tools. Prerequisite: FINN 3013 and FINN 3063.

FINN4173 Fixed Income Securities II (Sp) Continuation of FINN 4163. The markets and institutional settings of fixed income securities; valuation, and risk analysis of money market and capital market instruments; strategies and management of bond portfolios; taxable and tax-exempt securities; U.S. and non-U.S. fixed income securities; term structure of interest rate; and interest rate derivatives as hedging tools. Prerequisite: FINN 4163.

FINN4233 Advanced Corporate Finance (Irregular) Addresses complex and multifaceted issues and problems in financial decision-making. Prerequisite: FINN 3603.

FINN4313 Advanced Commercial Banking (Sp) Problems and cases emphasizing application of analytical tools and techniques in decision making process. Determination of operating policies regarding loans, investments, liquidity, capital; efficient performance of lending, investment function; profit planning, analysis; strategies of growth, competition; and evaluation of bank performance. Prerequisite: FINN 3133.

FINN4413 Real Estate Investment and Appraisal (Fa) Investment analysis and valuation theory applied to real estate. Prerequisite: FINN 3933.

FINN4433 Real Estate Finance (Sp) Consideration of professional aspects of real estate, brokerage, property management, finance, appraisal, property development, current problems and developments relating to real property. Prerequisite: FINN 3933.

FINN450V Independent Study (Irregular) (1-3) Permits students on an individual basis to explore selected topics in finance, with the consent of instructor.

FINN4733 Life and Health Insurance I (Fa) Basic principles, functions, uses of life and health insurance; types of policy contracts; calculation of premiums, reserves; organizations, management, supervision, of companies.

FINN4833 Property and Casualty Insurance I (Sp) Forms and functions of fire, marine, inland marine, automobile title, miscellaneous types insurance and bonds for business, personal use.

FINN5223 Financial Markets & Valuation (Sp) Analysis of financial information by capital markets in the determination of security values with specific applications to retail and logistics companies. This course views these and other companies from the point of view of the capital markets.

FINN5303 Advanced Corporate Financial Management (Irregular) Focus on financial policy issues using real situational cases. Topics include cost of capital, capital budgeting and long-term planning, value-based management, real options, as well as project financing and valuation. Prerequisite: MBAD 511V.

FINN5333 Investment Theory and Management (Fa) Integration of theory, practice of investments with solution of individual and institutional portfolio management problems; Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts' Problems; variable annuity in estate planning. Prerequisite: FINN 5223.

FINN5413 Shollmier Investment Project (Irregular) Provide students with the opportunity to design and apply complex investment strategies used in institutional portfolio management on the Shollmier MBA Fund that can involve fixed income and equity securities as well as derivatives. Students will use top down asset allocation models, bottom up security selection, and hedge fund strategies. Prerequisites: FINN 5223 and FINN 5333.

FINN5443 Retail Finance (Fa) The financial success of retail product and service offerings depends on a clear understanding of the socio-economic as well as demographic and environmental factors that drive the changing patterns of consumption. This course introduces the fundamentals and use of consumer and trade area analysis tools, specifically geographic information systems (GIS) and psychographic market analysis, to make informed financial decisions. Extensive case studies are utilized throughout the course to learn concepts and best practices. Prerequisite: FINN 5223

FINN5703 Multinational Business Finance (Irregular) Problems pertinent to managers of firms in multinational business environments, including international institutions, risks, investments and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: FINN 5203.

FINN6043 Finance Theory (Irregular) Provides a conceptual understanding of key theoretical developments in the field of financial economics, including firm decisions under risk within a world of uncertainty.

FINN6133 Seminar in Investment Theory (Sp) Study advanced literature in field investments, with special reference to theory of random walks, stock valuation models, portfolio management.

FINN636V Special Problems in Finance (Irregular) (1-6) Case studies in investments, corporation finance, money and banking, monetary theory, international finance, public finance. By arrangement. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

FINN6733 Seminar in Financial Markets and Institutions (Irregular) Recent developments in the literature of financial markets and institutions. Participants will be involved in the extensive study of existing theories and empirical tests of the theories.

FINN683V Contemporary Issues in Doctoral Colloquium (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) To explore and evaluate contemporary research issues in finance. Course content to reflect the most recent developments in theory and empirical research methodologies. Prerequisite: Doctoral student status and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

FINN700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(FREN) French

FREN1003 Elementary French I (Sp, Fa)

FREN1013 Elementary French II (Sp, Fa) Elementary courses stress correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability, and lead to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

FREN2003 Intermediate French I (Sp, Fa) Intermediate courses lead to greater facility in spoken language and to more advanced reading skills.

FREN2013 Intermediate French II (Sp, Fa) Continued development of basic speaking comprehension and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills.

FREN2013H Honors Intermediate French II (Sp, Fa)

FREN3003 Advanced French (Sp, Su, Fa) Further intensive practice for the purpose of strengthening written and oral expression. Includes a review of the essentials of French grammar. Prerequisite: FREN 2013 or equivalent.

FREN3033 French Conversation (Fa) Three hours per week of guided conversation practice for the post-intermediate student. Prerequisite: FREN 2013.

FREN3063 Ph.D. Reading Requirement I (Su)

FREN3103 Cultural Readings (Sp, Su, Fa) A course designed to build vocabulary and to strengthen reading skills and oral expression through extensive practice with culturally authentic materials. Prerequisite: FREN 2013.

FREN3113 Introduction to Literature (Sp, Su, Fa) Further development of reading skills and introduction to literacy commentary and analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 3003 or FREN 3103.

FREN399VH Honors French Course (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

FREN4003 French Grammar and Composition (Fa) Prerequisite: FREN 3003 or FREN 3103.

FREN4033 French for Oral Proficiency (Sp) Three hours per week of conversation practice for the advanced undergraduate. Prerequisite: FREN 3003 or FREN 3103.

FREN4113 Special Themes in French Literature (Irregular) Topics not normally covered in period courses. Sample topics: "The Comic Tradition in French Literature," "French Cinema." Topics announced one semester in advance. Prerequisite: FREN 3113. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

FREN4203H Honors Quebec Studies (Irregular) A study of Quebec's culture, institutions, economy, literature and cinema. Prerequisite: FREN 3113.

FREN4213 French Civilization (Sp) Prerequisite: FREN 3113.

FREN4223 A Survey of French Literature I (Su) A survey of French literature, its forms and themes from the medieval period through the 18th century. Prerequisite: FREN 3113.

FREN4233 A Survey of French Literature II (Sp, Su, Fa) A survey of French literature, its forms and themes in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: FREN 3113.

FREN4333 Business French (Fa) Introduction and orientation to the French world of business and commerce through the study of vocabulary, forms, and formulas and expression used in commercial correspondence. Prerequisite: FREN 3113.

FREN475V Special Investigations (Sp, Fa) (1-6)

FREN5003 French Grammar and Phonetics (Irregular) Systematic review of principles of French grammar and syntax; Comprehensive presentation of French phonetics.

FREN5033 Advanced French Conversation (Irregular) This course will provide small discussion environment in which graduate students will improve their command of spoken French in an interactive setting. Discussion will concentrate on current cultural issues in the French speaking world.

FREN5213 French Culture & Civilization (Irregular) An analysis of French cultural symbols and attitudes as observed in their historical economical, political, social, educational, and linguistic aspects.

FREN5333 Old French Literature (Irregular) An intensive study of French Medieval Literature from the Chansons de Geste to Vilon, including an in-depth analysis of the genres and their evolution, and of the major authors of the times.

FREN5353 Survey of French Poetry (Irregular) A comprehensive study of French poetry from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, focusing on close readings of individual poems. This course will cover literary movements and trends of the periods the terminology required to do explication de texte.

FREN5433 French 16th Century Literature (Irregular) A survey of representative writers of the sixteenth century.

FREN5543 French 17th Century Literature (Irregular) A survey of representative writers of the seventeenth century.

FREN5663 French Short Story (Irregular) An introduction to the French short story, focusing on close readings of a variety of contes and nouvelles from the Middle Ages through the twenty-first century.

FREN5673 French 18th Century Literature (Irregular)

FREN5703 Special Topics (Irregular) May be offered in a subject not specifically covered by the courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

FREN575V Special Investigations (Irregular) (1-6)

FREN5773 Survey of Francophone Literature (Irregular) A survey of representative texts in the field of sub-Saharan and North African literature concentrating on postcolonial novels using contemporary critical approaches.

FREN5783 The French Nineteenth Century Novel (Irregular)

FREN5813 French 20th Century Theatre (Irregular)

FREN5833 French 20th Century Novel (Irregular)

(GEOG) Geography

GEOG1123 Human Geography (Sp, Su, Fa) Basic course in human geography stressing the interrelationships between the natural factors of the environment and man's activities, especially the role of geography in the understanding of social problems and economic and political activities.

GEOG2003 World Regional Geography (Sp, Fa) Survey of problems, development potential, and physical and human resources of the developing and developed world.

GEOG3003 Conservation of Natural Resources (Sp, Su, Fa) Theory and growth of conservation and the wise use of the major natural resources of the United States. This course meets the requirement in conservation for teachers. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG3003H Honors Conservation of Natural Resources (Sp, Su, Fa) Theory and growth of conservation and the wise use of the major natural resources of the United States. This course meets the requirement in conservation for teachers. Prerequisite: junior standing.

GEOG3033 Building Materials field Studies and Laboratory (Even Years, Sp) Study of durable building materials, their availability, strength, deterioration, limitation and utility. Historic construction techniques, identification of architectural materials, architectural elements assessment, causes and mechanisms of deterioration, conservation and treatment of architectural materials, preservation philosophies and standards and creation of a practical field identification kit will also be covered.

GEOG3333 Oceanography (Even years, Sp) The sea, its landforms; its winds and currents as related to the atmosphere, world climates, and world trade; its basin as avenues for continental drift; its waters as habitat for plant and animal life; its marine and submarine resources as presently and potentially useful to man. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG3343 Natural Regions of North America (Irregular) Introduces students to the characteristics of the natural environments of North America. The soils, landforms, climate, hydrology, and flora and fauna of the principal natural regions of the United States, Canada, and Central America are examined.

GEOG3353 Economic Geography of NAFTA (Irregular) Systematic study of the geographical distribution of economic activities in the countries of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG3383 Principles of Landscape Evolution (Fa) Examines the role of waves, rivers, wind, and tectonics in shaping and modifying the surface of the earth. Considers the way in which an understanding of landscape processes is essential to the effective solution of environmental problems. Lecture 3 hours. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

GEOG3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in geography).

GEOG399VH Honors Course (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

GEOG4033 Geography of the Middle East (Irregular) Physical and cultural landscapes, natural and cultural resources, art and architecture, land use, political history, OPEC, and current problems of North Africa and the Middle East region west of Afghanistan are discussed. Class participation, discussions, slides and films, and student presentations will round out the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG4033H Honors Geography of the Middle East (Irregular) Physical and cultural landscapes, natural and cultural resources, art and architecture, land use, political history, OPEC, and current problems of North Africa and the Middle East region west of Afghanistan are discussed. Class participation, discussions, slides and films, and student presentations will round out the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG4063 Urban Geography (Sp) Areal patterns of modern urban regions and the focus shaping these patterns. Emphasis is placed on American urban areas and their evolution and functional areas. Field work. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG410V Special Problems in Geography (Fa) (1-6) Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study one particular geographic topic in some detail. Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOG410VH Honors Special Problems in Geography (Fa) (1-6) Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study one particular geographic topic in some detail. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOG4243 Political Geography (Odd years, Fa) Contemporary world political problems in their geographic context. Development of the principles of political geography with emphasis upon the problems of Eastern Europe, Africa, and Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG430V Internship in Physical Geography (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) Supervised experience in municipal, county, state or private natural resource management agency, or any other such organization approved by instructor.

GEOG4353 Elements of Weather (Fa) Examination of the atmospheric processes that result in multifarious weather systems. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG4363 Climatology (Sp) Fundamentals of topical climatology followed by a study of regional climatology. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: GEOG 1003 and/or GEOG 4353.

GEOG4383 Hazard & Disaster Assessment, Mitigation, Risk & Policy (Sp) Comprehensive introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to natural and environmental hazards and risk. Hazards and disaster assessment, mitigation, and policy are the focus of the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

GEOG4383H Honors Hazard & Disaster Assessment, Mitigation, Risk & Policy (Sp) Comprehensive introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to natural and environmental hazards and risk. Hazards and disaster assessment, mitigation, andpolicy aare the focus of the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

GEOG4783 Geography of Europe (Irregular) Geographic regions of the area with emphasis on their present development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOG5003 Seminar in Geography (Irregular) Selected topics, the nature of which varies with the need. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

GEOG5011 Colloquium (Sp) Weekly meetings of faculty, graduates, advanced students and guests to discuss research and trends in the field of geography. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

GEOG5093 History of Geography (Even years, Sp) Chronological development of the science; leaders in the field of geography; and the evolution of the major concepts of geography. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEOG510V Special Problems in Physical Geography (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOG5113 Global Change (Fa) Examines central issues of global change including natural and human induced climate change, air pollution, deforestation, desertification, wetland loss urbanization, and the biodiversity crisis. The U.S. Global Change Research Program is also examined. (Same as ENDY 5113)

GEOG520V Special Problems in Human Geography (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOG530V Special Problems in Regional Geography (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEOG5313 Planetary Atmospheres (Irregular) Origins of planetary atmospheres, structures of atmospheres, climate evolution, dynamics of atmospheres, levels in the atmosphere, the upper atmosphere, escape of atmospheres, comparative planetology of atmospheres.

GEOG5333 Research Methods and Materials in Geography (Odd years, Fa) Geographical research and the preparation of research papers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEOG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(GEOL) Geology

GEOL1111M Honors General Geology Laboratory (Fa) Survey of geological processes and products and their relationships to landforms, natural resources, living environments, and human beings. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: GEOL 1113H.

GEOL1111L General Geology Laboratory (Sp, Su, Fa) Laboratory exercises concerning the identification of rocks and minerals, use of aerial photographs and topographic maps, and several field trips. Pre- or Corequisite: GEOL 1113.

GEOL1113 General Geology (Sp, Su, Fa) Survey of geological processes and products, and their relationships to landforms, natural resources, living environments and human beings. Lecture 3 hours per week. GEOL 1111L is recommended as a corequisite.

GEOL1113H Honors General Geology (Irregular) Survey of geological processes and products and their relationships to landforms, natural resources, living environments, and human beings. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisites: GEOL 1111M.

GEOL1131L Environmental Geology Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory exercises concerning human interactions with the physical environment including the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, erosion, mass wasting, water supply and contamination, and waste disposal. Prerequisite: (GEOL 1113 and GEOL 1111L) or (GEOG 1003 and GEOG 1001L).

GEOL1133 Environmental Geology (Sp) The application of geologic principles and knowledge of problems created by human occupancy and exploitation of the physical environment. Prerequisite: (GEOL 1113 and GEOL 1111L) or (GEOG 1003 and GEOG 1001L).

GEOL2313 Minerals & Rocks (Fa) General principles of mineralogy and petrology, study and identification of common minerals, igneous & metamorphic rocks using hand samples. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113.

GEOL3002 Geology for Engineers (Fa) Geologic principles involved in construction, reservoir location, etc. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

GEOL3032 Geology of Arkansas (Sp) A survey of the distribution, genesis, and age of the rocks, fossils, structures, landforms and geological processes of Arkansas. Equivalent to two hours of lecture per week. Field trips required. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113 or GEOL 1113H.

GEOL3114 Invertebrate Paleontology (Sp) Survey of the invertebrate phyla commonly preserved as fossils emphasizing their physical and biological characteristics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 1133 or (BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L) or equivalent.

GEOL3313 Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks (Sp) Megascopic study and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 2313.

GEOL3413 Sedimentary Rocks & Fossils (Sp) An introductory study of sedimentary rocks and fossils from the standpoint of classification, field and laboratory description, genesis, and preservation. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 2313.

GEOL3514 Structural Geology (Fa) Survey of deformational features and their geological significance in the crust of the earth. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 1004 or GEOL 1113 or GEOL 3002.

GEOL360V Undergraduate Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Library, laboratory, or field research in different phases of geology. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOL3901 Junior Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) Special honors research in geology. One hour credit each semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOL3911 Junior Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) Special honors research in geology. One hour credit each semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

GEOL3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in geology).

GEOL4033 Hydrogeology (Sp) Occurrence, movement, and interaction of water with geologic and cultural features. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 and GEOL 3513 and GEOL 3511L.

GEOL4053 Geomorphology (Sp) Mechanics of landform development. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Several local field trips are required during the semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113 or GEOL 3002.

GEOL4063 Principles of Geochemistry (Fa) Introduction to fundamental principles of geochemistry from historic development to modern concepts. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1121 and CHEM 1123.

GEOL4153 Karst Hydrogeology (Irregular) Assessment of ground water resources in carbonate rock terrains; relation of ground water and surface water hydrology to karst; quantification of extreme variability in karst environments; data collection rationale. Field trips required. Prerequisite: GEOL 4033.

GEOL4223 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (Sp) Introductory investigation of stratigraphic and sedimentologic factors important to the study of sedimentary rocks. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. A required weekend, two-day field trip will be conducted during the semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 3413.

GEOL4253 Petroleum Geology (Fa) Distribution and origin of petroleum. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Geology major and senior standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

GEOL436V Geology Field Trip (Sp) (1-2) Camping field trip to areas of geologic interest, usually conducted during Spring Break. Prerequisite: GEOL 3313. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GEOL4433 Geophysics (Irregular) Derivation from physical principles, of the geophysical methods for mapping the Earth. Computational methods of converting gravity, magnetic, radiometric, electrical, and seismic data into geologic information. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 and PHYS 2033 and PHYS 2031L and GEOL 3513 and GEOL 3511L.

GEOL4443 The Solid Earth: Structure, Composition and Evolution (Irregular) Modern views for the origin of the solid Earth and its structure, composition, and evolution through geologic time. Topics will include examination of relevant geophysical and geochemical constraints used to develop global models for the Earth. Prerequisites: CHEM 1123, GEOL 3313, MATH 2564, PHYS 2074 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL4553 Volcanology (Irregular) A broad introduction to volcanic processes and their associated hazards. Emphasis will be placed on applying basic physical and chemical principles to understanding volcanic systems. Prerequisite: GEOL 2313.

GEOL4666 Geology Field Camp (Su) A professional course taught off campus emphasizing occurrence, description, mapping, and interpretation of major rock types. Prerequisite: GEOL 3413 and GEOL 3514. (may not be taken for graduate credit).

GEOL481V Cooperative Education Program (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Credit for off-campus, compensated work experience related to geology arranged through the Cooperative Education Office and Department of Geology.

GEOL4863 Geological Data Analysis (Sp) Quantitative methods and techniques for analysis and interpretation of geological data. Prerequisite: MATH 2564, GEOL 3514.

GEOL4922 Senior Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) Special honors research in geology. Two hours of credit each semester. Prerequisite: Junior honors.

GEOL4924 Earth System History (Sp) Physical and biological events that form the history of the earth from its formation to the beginning of the historical era. Graduate enrollment only with departmental permission. Prerequisite: GEOL 3514.

GEOL4932 Senior Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa) Special honors research in geology. Two hours of credit each semester. Prerequisite: Junior honors.

GEOL5001 Graduate Seminar (Irregular) Informal discussions of research as reported in geological literature. All graduate students are expected to attend.

GEOL5063 Geochemistry (Fa) Chemistry of geologic processes and the geochemical cycles of selected elements. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1101L and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

GEOL5076 Advanced Field Methods of Applied Hydrogeology (Su) Applied field course emphasizing collection and interpretation of ground water data. Three hours may be applied toward an M.S. degree in geology. Prerequisite: GEOL 4033.

GEOL5123 Stratigraphic Principles and Practice (Irregular) Physical and biological characteristics of sedimentary environments and their correlation in time with emphasis on the local geologic section. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 4223.

GEOL5153 Environmental Site Assessment (Irregular) Principles, problems, and methods related to conducting an environmental site assessment. An applied course covering field site assessment, regulatory documentation, and report preparation. Prerequisite: GEOL 4033. (Same as ENDY 5153)

GEOL5163 Hydrogeologic Modeling (Irregular) Topics include numerical simulation of ground water flow, solute transport, aqueous geochemistry, theoretical development of equations, hypothesis testing of conceptual models, limitations of specific methods, and error analysis. Emphasis on practical applications and problem solving. Prerequisite: GEOL 4033 and computer literacy.

GEOL5223 Sedimentary Petrology (Fa) Sediments and sedimentary rocks. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 4223.

GEOL5263 Hydrochemical Methods (Even years, Fa) Collection, analytical and interpretation techniques and methods for water, including quality control and quality assurance. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L.

GEOL5413 Planetary Geology (Irregular) Exploration of the solar system, geology and stratigraphy, meteorite impacts, planetary surfaces, planetary crusts, basaltic volcanism, planetary interiors, chemical composition of the planets, origin and evolution of the Moon and planets.

GEOL5443 The Solid Earth (Irregular) Modern views for the origin of the solid Earth and its structure, composition, and evolution through geologic time. Topics will include examination of relevant geophysical and geochemical constraints used to develop global models for the Earth. Prerequisite: GEOL3313, MATH2564, CHEM1123, PHYS2074 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL5543 Tectonics (Fa) Development of ramifications of the plate tectonics theory. Analysis of the evolution of mountain belts. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: GEOL 3513 and GEOL 3511L.

GEOL5553 Volcanology (Irregular) A broad introduction to volcanic processes and their associated hazards. Emphasis will be placed on applying basic physical and chemical principles to understanding volcanic systems. Prerequisite: GEOL 2313.

GEOL560V Graduate Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (2-6) Library, laboratory, or field research in different phases of geology. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GEOL600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(GEOS) Geosciences

GEOS3023 Introduction to Cartography (Fa) Students learn basic principles of map design, cartographic theory and field surveying to produce a variety of computer-generated maps. An introductory course designed for students in a variety of different disciplines using AutoCad software and various new technologies. Field trips may be required.

GEOS3543 Geographic Information Science (Fa, Sp) Computer assisted analysis and display of geographic resource data. Course develops the theory behind spatial data analysis techniques, and reinforces the theory with exercises that demonstrate its practical applications. (Same as ANTH 3543)

GEOS3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in geology or geography).

GEOS440V Internship in GIS & Cartography (Sp, Su, Fa) (3-6) Supervised experience in GIS and/or cartographic applications with municipal, county, state, or private enterprises. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GEOS4413 Principles of Remote Sensing (Fa) Fundamental concepts of remote sensing of the environment. Optical, infrared, microwave, LIDAR, and in situ sensor systems are introduced. Remote sensing of vegetation, water, urban landscapes, soils, minerals, and geomorphology is discussed. The course includes laboratory exercises in geomatics software and both remote and in situ sensor system field trips. Prerequisite: University science course.

GEOS4523 Computer Mapping (Sp) This course addresses advanced cartographic concepts (i.e. visual hierarchy, aesthetics, image cognition) and production techniques as they relate to computer-assisted mapping. Students produce a variety of maps using AutoCad and Illustrator software to build a map portfolio. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: GEOG 3023.

GEOS4553 Introduction to Raster GIS (Fa) Theory, data structure, algorithms, and techniques behind raster-based geographical information systems. Through laboratory exercises and lectures multidisciplinary applications are examined in database creation, remotely sensed data handling, elevation models, and resource models using boolean, map algebra, and other methods. Prerequisite: GEOS 3543 or ANTH 3543. (Same as ANTH 4553)

GEOS4563 Geology of Our National Parks (Fa) This course examines the underlying geology responsible for selected parks, and explores the interplay of geology, biology, climate, topography, and humans to evaluate the value of the parks, and to anticipate the problems they will face in the near and long-term. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113.

GEOS4563H Honors Geology of Our National Parks (Fa) This course examines the underlying geology responsible for selected parks, and explores the interplay of geology, biology, climate, topography, and humans to evaluate the value of the parks, and to anticipate the problems they will face in the near and long-term. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113.

GEOS4583 Vector GIS (Sp) Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) applications in marketing, transportation, real estate, demographics, urban and regional planning, and related areas. Lectures focus on development of principles, paralleled by workstation-based laboratory exercises using mainstream GIS software and relational data bases. Prerequisite: GEOS 3023 or GEOS 3543. (Same as ANTH 4563)

GEOS4593 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (Fa) Fundamentals of navigation, mapping, and high-precision positioning using the Navstar Global Positioning System. Topics include datum definition and transformation, map projections, autonomous and differential positioning using both code and carrier processing, and analysis of errors. Prerequisite: GEOS 3543. (Same as ANTH 4593)

GEOS4653 Advanced Raster GIS (Odd years, Sp) Advanced raster topics are examined beginning with a theoretical and methodological review of Tomlin's cartographic modeling principles. Topics vary and include Fourier methods, image processing, kriging, spatial statistics, principal components, fuzzy and regression modeling, and multi-criteria decision models. Several raster GIS programs are examined with links to statistical analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOS 4553 or ANTH 4553.

GEOS4693 Environmental Justice (Sp) This course deals with the ethical, environmental, legal, economic, and social implications of society's treatment of the poor, the disenfranchised, and minorities who live in the less desirable, deteriorating neighborhoods, communities, and niches of our country. The class integrates science with philosophy, politics, economics, policy, and law, drawing on award-winning films, current news, and case studies.

GEOS4693H Honors Environmental Justice (Sp) This course deals with the ethical, environmental, legal, economic, and social implications of society's treatment of the poor, the disenfranchised, and minorities who live in the less desirable, deteriorating neighborhoods, communities, and niches of our country. The class integrates science with philosophy, politics, economics, policy, and law, drawing on award-winning films, current news, and case studies.

GEOS4863 Quantitave Techniques in Geosciences (Sp) An introduction to the application of standard quantitative and spatial statistical techniques to geoscientific analysis. Students will use both micro and large system computers in the course. Prerequisite: (STAT 4003 and STAT 4001L) or equivalent. (Same as ANTH 4863)

GEOS5023 Technical and Proposal Writing for the Geosciences (Sp) Preparation of technical reports, research proposals, and manuscripts for publication in the area of geosciences.

GEOS5033 Advanced Vector Geographic Information Systems (Irregular) Advanced vector operations and analysis. Topics will include topological analysis, network analysis, geocoding, conflation, implications of source and product map scale, map generation, error mapping, and cartographic production. Prerequisite: (ANTH 4563 or GEOS 4583) or equivalent. (Same as ANTH 5043,ENDY 5033)

GEOS5053 Quaternary Environments (Fa) An interdisciplinary study of the Quaternary Period, including dating methods, deposits, soils, climates, tectonics, and human adaptation. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as ANTH 5053,ENDY 5053)

GEOS5063 Climate Through Time (Sp) The earth's climate history over the last 2 million years and the influence various factors have had on it; compilation and paleoclimatic histories and methods of dating climatic effects. Prerequisite: GEOG 4363 or equivalent. (Same as BIOL 5063,ENDY 5063)

GEOS5423 Remote Sensing of Natural Resources (Even years, Sp) Introductory digital image processing of remotely sensed data. Topics include data collection, laboratory design, scientific visualization, radiometric and geometric correction, enhancement, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, and accuracy assessment in natural resource remote sensing. Advanced geomatics software exercises and a final project are included. Prerequisite: GEOS 4413 and proficiency in a programming language.

GEOS5853 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry (Sp) Introduction to principles of isotope fractionation and distribution in geologic environments, isotopic analytical methods, and extraction of isotope samples; application of isotopes in characterization of geologic processes and interaction with hydrologic, surficial, and biologic attenuation, paleothermometry soil, and biogeochemical processes. Prerequisite: GEOL 5063 or GEOL 5263. (Same as ENDY 5853) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

(GERM) German

GERM1003 Elementary German I (Sp, Su, Fa)

GERM1013 Elementary German II (Sp, Su, Fa) Elementary courses stress correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability, and lead to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

GERM2003 Intermediate German I (Sp, Su, Fa) Intermediate courses lead to greater facility in spoken language and to more advanced reading skills.

GERM2013 Intermediate German II (Sp, Su, Fa) Continued development of basic speaking comprehension and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills.

GERM2013H Honors Intermediate German II (Sp, Fa)

GERM3003 Advanced German I (Fa) Development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Some grammar review and translation exercises. Emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and the correct use of idiomatic expressions. Prerequisite: GERM 2013.

GERM3013 Introduction to Literature (Fa) Development of reading skills and introduction to literary analysis. Prerequisite: GERM 2013 or equivalent.

GERM3033 Conversation (Sp) Three hours per week of guided conversation practice for the post-intermediate student. Prerequisite: GERM 2013.

GERM3063 Ph.D. Reading Requirement (Su) (Same as GERM 4003)

GERM399VH Honors German Course (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

GERM4003 Advanced German II (Sp) Further development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Some grammar review and translation exercises. Emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and the correct use of idiomatic expressions. Prerequisite: GERM 2013. (Same as GERM 3063)

GERM4033 Advanced Conversation (Sp) Three hours per week of conversation practice for the advanced undergraduate. Prerequisite: GERM 3033.

GERM4123 The German Novelle (Irregular) An intensive study of the novelle as a genre from its origin to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 3013.

GERM4133 The German Drama (Irregular) A study of the development of the forms and themes of the German drama from the middle ages to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 3013.

GERM4133H Honors The German Drama (IR) A study of the development of the forms and themes of the German drama from the middle ages to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 3013

GERM4143 German Lyric Poetry (Irregular) A study of the forms and themes of German lyric poetry from the middle ages to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 3013.

GERM4213 German Civilization (Irregular) Prerequisite: GERM 2013 or equivalent.

GERM4333 Business German I (Fa) Introduces students to the language of business German and provides insights into business practices in the German-speaking countries. Covers aspects of business geography, the European Union, transportation/shipping, business correspondence, resume writing and job application. Open to all majors; no business prerequisites. Prerequisite: GERM 2013. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GERM470V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-3) May be offered in a topic not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GERM475V Special Investigations (Sp, Fa) (1-6)

GERM5223 Early German Literature: Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (Sp, Su, Fa)

GERM5273 German Literature: Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Classicism (Sp, Su, Fa)

GERM5343 Early Modern German Literature: Late 19th and Early 20th Century (Sp, Su, Fa)

GERM5363 German Literature after 1945 (Sp, Su, Fa)

GERM5703 Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) May be offered in a subject not specifically covered by the courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GERM575V Special Investigations (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

(GERO) Gerontology

GERO4443 Gerontology (Sp) Physiological and psychological development of the aging individual, extended family relations, service networks for the elderly, and retirement activities. Some attention to housing and care needs of persons in advanced years. Lecture 3 hours per week. Seminar. Prerequisite: instructor consent.

GERO5013 Field Experience in Gerontology (Irregular) Supervised research/practical experience in field setting. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GERO5023 Critical Issues in Aging (Irregular) Consideration of current issues of aging not covered in depth in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(GNEG) General Engineering

GNEG1103 Introduction to Engineering (Sp) This introductory course for undergraduate freshmen students introduces them to the fields of engineering and many of the modeling and problem solving techniques used by engineers. It also introduces the students to the engineering profession and some of the computer tools necessary for pursuing a degree in engineering.

GNEG1111 Introduction to Engineering I (Fa) Fundamentals of engineering problem-solving including skills from mathematics, science, and computing. Introduction to the engineering design process through team-based activities. Study of the contemporary engineering profession and the disciplines within the College of Engineering. Prerequisite: General Engineering majors only.

GNEG1111H Honors Introduction to Engineering I (Fa) Fundamentals of engineering problem-solving including skills from mathematics, science, and computing. Introduction to the engineering design process through team-based activities. Study of the contemporary engineering profession and the disciplines within the College of Engineering. Prerequisite: General Engineering majors only.

GNEG1121 Introduction to Engineering II (Sp) Further study of engineering problem-solving including skills from mathematics, science, and computing. Experience with the engineering design process through a major, team-based project. Selecting a major within the College of Engineering. Discussion of academic and professional opportunities for engineering students. Prerequisite: General Engineering students only. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2554.

GNEG1121H Honors Introduction to Engineering II (Sp) Further study of engineering problem-solving including skills from mathematics, science, and computing. Experience with the engineering design process through a major, team-based project. Selecting a major within the College of Engineering. Discussion of academic and professional opportunities for engineering students. Prerequisite: General Engineering students only. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2554.

GNEG1122 Introduction CAD (Sp, Fa) General course in the use of engineering drawings for communications and design. Proper use of computer for computer-aided drafting and design; 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional, and solid modeling; use of manual drafting equipment; geometrical exercises; orthographic projections; auxiliary view; sketching; dimensioning. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1213 or higher. Corequisite: Lab component.

GNEG1201 Fundamentals of Success in Engineering Study (Sp, Fa) Assisting Engineering First Year students in developing skills for successful completion of engineering course work. Building a supportive learning community, assisting students in developing positive attitudes and productive behaviors resulting in both academic and personal success, and informing students of the resources available for maintaining their academic and personal wellness. Prerequisite: Consent required.

GNEG1301H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) (1-2) Covers a set of special topics or issues relevant to Freshman Engineering students. Offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors College students only. Approval required. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

GNEG3103 Globalization and Innovation (Irregular) Integration of engineering in the globalized business environment. Innovation and integration models. Global survival skills. International organizational value-chain. Conducting business with emerging nations. Case studies; field trips; guest lectures. Experiential learning design component. Taken by students participating in departmental approved study abroad programs. May not earn credit for GNEG 4103 or 5103.

GNEG3103H Honors Globalization and Innovation (Irregular) Integration of engineering in the globalized business environment. Innovation and integration models. Global survival skills. International organizational value-chain. Conducting business with emerging nations. Case studies; field trips; guest lectures. Experiential learning design component. Taken by students participating in departmental approved study abroad programs. May not earn credit for GNEG 4103 or 5103.

GNEG3801 Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) Supervised experience in industry where students can learn to apply classroom skills to problems in the real-world environment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

GNEG3811 Cooperative Education (Sp, Su, Fa) Supervised experience in industry where students can learn to apply classroom skills to problems in the real-world environment. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

GNEG390V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GNEG390VH Honors Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GNEG4103 Globalization and Innovation (Irregular) Integration of engineering in the globalized business environment. Innovation and integration models. Global survivals skills. International organizational value-chain. Conducting business with emerging nations. Casestudies; fieldtrips; guest lectures. Experiential learning design component. Taken by students participating in departmental approved study abroad programs. May not earn credit for GNEG 3103 or 5103.

GNEG4103H Honors Globalization and Innovation (Irregular) Integration of engineering in the globalized business environment. Innovation and integration models. Global survivals skills. International organizational value-chain. Conducting business with emerging nations. Casestudies; fieldtrips; guest lectures. Experiential learning design component. Taken by students participating in departmental approved study abroad programs. May not earn credit for GNEG 3103 or 5103.

GNEG490V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GNEG490VH Honors Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

GNEG5103 Globalization and Innovation (Irregular) Integration of engineering in the globalized business environment. Innovation and integration models. Global survival skills. International organizational value-chain. Conducting business with emerging nations. Case studies; field trips; guest lectures. Experiential learning design component. Taken by students participating in departmental approved study abroad programs. May not earn credit for GNEG 3103 or 4103.

GNEG5801 Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) Supervised experience in industry where students can learn to apply classroom skills to problems in the real-world environment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

GNEG5811 Cooperative Education (Sp, Su, Fa) Supervised experience in industry where students can learn to apply classroom skills to problems in the real world environment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

GNEG590V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

(GREK) Greek

GREK1003 Elementary Ancient Greek I (Fa) The rudiments of classical Greek, with concentration on grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Short selections from ancient authors lead to basic reading ability.

GREK1013 Elementary Ancient Greek II (Sp) A continuation of the rudiments of classical Greek, with concentration on grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Short selection from ancient authors lead to basic reading ability.

GREK1203 Beginning Modern Greek I (Fa) Conversational language of Greece today. Stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Leads to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

GREK1213 Beginning Modern Greek II (Sp) A continuation of GREK 1203. Stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Leads to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

GREK2003 Plato's Apology of Socrates or Greek New Testament or Both (Fa)

GREK2013 Homer (Sp) Selections from the Iliad or the Odyssey: a survey of Greek epic poetry.

GREK2203 Intermediate Modern Greek I (Fa) Continuation of Beginning Modern Greek. Prerequisite: GREK 1203 and GREK 1213, or equivalent.

GREK2213 Intermediate Modern Greek II (Sp) Continuation of Intermediate Modern Greek I. Prerequisite: GREK 2203 or equivalent.

GREK4003 Greek Lyric Poetry (Irregular) Readings from selected Greek lyric poems, to be chosen from several appropriate authors from the 7th through the 5th centuries BCE: Archilochus, Hipponax, Sappho, Alcaeus, Tyrtaeus, Mimnermus, Semonides, Solon, Xenophanes, Theognis, Pindar, Bacchylides. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4013 Greek Epic Poetry (Irregular) Study of the primary works of Greek hexameter poetry, including Homer, Hesiod, and/or the Homeric Hymns, with special attention to issues of oral composition and performance. Prerequisite: GREK 2013.

GREK4023 Greek Philosophy (Irregular) Study of representative works of Greek philosophy, including those of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and/or Aristotle. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4033 Herodotus or Thucydides (Irregular) Readings of Herodotus, Book VII, and Thucydides, Book VI; collateral readings on the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4043 Greek Drama (Irregular) Readings of 2 tragedies and one comedy; a study of the Greek theatre. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4053 Greek Syntax and Composition (Irregular) Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4063 Hellenistic Poetry (Irregular) Selections from significant post-classical authors, including Callimachus, Theocritus, Bion, Moschus, Herondas, Apollonios of Rhodes, and/or poets of the Greek Anthology. Special attention to archaic and classical influences, contemporary Hellenistic culture, and Roman responses. Prerequisite: GREK 2013.

GREK4073 Ancient Greek Novel (Irregular) Study of the development of the Greek novel including the works of Lucian, Longus, Heliodorus, and/or Achilles Tatius. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4083 Greek Epigraphy (Irregular) Study of inscriptions, especially Attic, in their historical and social contexts, from the 8th century BCE to the Hellenistic/Roman period. Training in epigraphical conventions and symbols. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4093 Biblical and Patristic Greek (Irregular) Selected readings from appropriate texts, varying by semester, including the Septuagint, New Testament, Apostolic Fathers, and other patristic literature to the 5th century CE. Reading and discussion of selected texts in major genres. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK4103 Greek Oratory (Irregular) Readings from selected speeches, to be chosen from one or more appropriate authors: Lysias, Antiphon, Demosthenes, Isocrates, Andocides. Study of sophism and rhetoric of Athens in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. Prerequisite: GREK 2013 or equivalent.

GREK475V Special Investigations (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

GREK575V Special Investigations (Irregular) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

(GRSD) Graduate Education Courses

GRSD400V Research Experience Undergraduate Internship (Su) (1-6) Internship for students participating in an undergraduate research experience. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

GRSD5003 The Professoriate: Teaching, Learning and Assessment (Sp) Designed to introduce the future academic professional to the expectations of the faculty teaching role in higher education. Topics include techniques of effective teaching and learning, dealing with a variety of institutional expectations, course management issues, and using models of effective teaching across a broad spectrum of class sizes and levels.

GRSD5013 Practicum for Future Faculty (Irregular) This course is designed to follow GRSD 5003 and to give participants opportunities to apply theories and methods learned in that course. To accomplish these goals, the course instructor helps the participant arrange a mentoring opportunity as part of this course. Prerequisite: GRSD 5003. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GRSD502V Special Topics in Preparing Future Faculty (Irregular) (1-3) Seminar on selected topics for those anticipating a career teaching in higher education. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

GRSD5033 The Professoriate: Research and Service (Fa) Designed to complement GRSD 5003 by focusing on topics of interest to future academic professionals beyond those related to instruction. Topics include developing a research statement, strategies for securing an academic position the general nature of employment and service expectations in higher education, research ethics, and funding issues, including grant proposal writing.

(HESC) Human Environmental Sciences

HESC1013 Introduction to Clothing Concepts (Sp, Fa) Origin of dress, the evolution of fashion as an economic power, the sociological and psychological aspects of clothing in various cultures, aesthetics of dress, selection and consumption of clothing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre- or corequisite: HESC 1501 (for HESC majors only).

HESC1023 Introduction to Apparel Production (Sp, Fa) Course focuses on basic principles of apparel production and analysis of garment components of mass produced apparel. Students utilize computer generated designs in the production process. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC students only.

HESC1031 About the Profession (Fa) Exploration of the field of interior design. Guest speakers and field trips. Pre- or Corequisite: HESC 1034 and HESC 1501.

HESC1034 Studio 1 Design Exploration 1 (Fa) Introduction to design language through two- and three-dimensional projects. Pre- or Corequisites: HESC 1031 and HESC 1501.

HESC1044 Studio II: Design Exploration II (Sp) Ideation, representation, and space making. Prerequisite: HESC 1031 and HESC 1034.

HESC1053 Computer Based Methods for Apparel (Sp, Fa) This course is designed to give students basic experience with CAD (computer aided design) software in a computer laboratory environment. Lecture 2 hours per week.

HESC1201 Introduction to Dietetics and Nutrition (Fa) Introduction to profession of dietetics and nutrition including history, scope and future of professionals with emphasis on academic preparation, internships, acquisition of professional credentials, career laddering and career opportunities. Guest speakers will supplement lectures and assignments.

HESC1213 Nutrition in Health (Sp, Fa) The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness.

HESC1403 Life Span Development (Sp, Fa) A broad overview of the physical, psychological, and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in a family context. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC1411L Observation of Children in Early Childhood Programs (Sp) In a laboratory setting, students will learn foundational observation skills necessary to understand and assess the development of young children. Emphasis will be on objectivity, confidentiality, and accuracy as students practice a variety of documentation techniques. Corequisite: HDFS majors only.

HESC1501 Orientation to Human Environmental Sciences (Sp, Fa) Adjustment to study and personal problems in college. History of human environmental sciences and breadth of its professional opportunities.

HESC1601 Work Experience Practicum (Sp) This course is designed to give HRMN students credit for their required 1,000 hours of satisfactory and verifiable hospitality work experience once they are enrolled in the HRMN concentration. Each credit hour is equivalent to 250 work hours. Prerequisite: Declared HRMN concentration. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

HESC1603 Introduction to Hospitality Management (Sp, Fa) Overview of the hospitality industry with an emphasis on the history, scope, economic trends, and professional opportunities of this global industry. Professional areas include: commercial, institutional, and long term residential food service; hotels and resorts; travel and tourism; convention and club management.

HESC200V Special Problems (Irregular) (1-3) Special problems are conducted under the guidance of a faculty member and include an inquiry initiated by the student into an aspect of study or program not dealt with in the regular curriculum. Students are required to submit to their instructor a detailed outline of the problem they will examine. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HESC2013 Quality Assessment of Apparel (Sp, Fa) Study of apparel from the perspective of structure, aesthetics, cost and expected performance of the finished product. Lecture 2 hours per week, lab 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1023 and HESC 2053.

HESC2023 Visual Merchandising and Fashion Promotion (Sp, Fa) Fashion components, terminology and design features as applied to apparel. Principles and techniques of visual merchandising and fashion promotions as a means of mass communication in the fashion industry. Window display and store floor planning for commercial purposes. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Pre or Corequisite: APST majors only.

HESC2053 Introduction to Textile Science (Sp, Fa) Textile fibers and fabrics, their structure, properties, manufacture, wearing qualities and methods of laundering, finishing, and dyeing. Artistic and economic selection of materials for clothing and household furnishings. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

HESC2111L Foods I Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Laboratory exercises and practice applicable of Foods I. Lab 3 hours. Corequisite: HESC 2112.

HESC2112 Foods I (Sp, Fa) Physical and chemical characteristics of foods and factors that affect these characteristics during storage and preparation. Lecture 2 hours. Pre- or corequisite: HESC 1501 (applies to HESC majors only). Corequisite: HESC 2111L. Prerequisite: CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L (or CHEM 1103).

HESC2123 Catering Management (Sp) Course focuses on catering in food service operations and management, including on-premise, off-premise, working with a contract management operation and theme catering. Emphasis is concentrated on the functions of catering to include planning, operations, organizing the event, equipment, implementing, controlling and legal issues. Lecture 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: HESC 1603.

HESC2203 Nutrition for Exercise and Sport (Sp) The integration of concepts from nutrition and exercise physiology into an applied multidisciplinary study of how food, beverages and dietary supplements influence physical performance. Prerequisite: HESC 1213.

HESC2401L Infant and Toddler Development Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Corequisite: HESC 2402.

HESC2402 Infant and Toddler Development (Sp, Fa) Human development from conception through toddlerhood. Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development is covered. Lecture 2 hours per week. Corequisite: HESC 2401L.

HESC2413 Family Relations (Sp, Fa) Courtship, marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. On-campus and Web-based delivery sections are offered. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre- or corequisite: HESC 1501 (applies to HESC majors only).

HESC2433 Child Development (Sp, Fa) Theory, research, and application in cognitive, social, physical, and linguistic development of the child aged three to adolescence. Lecture 3 hours per week; time arranged for directed observation. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 or PSYC 2003.

HESC2443 The Hospitalized Child: Child Life Programming (Sp) Introduces child life programming in health care settings. Topics include: roles and expectations of a Child Life Specialist, importance of play, coping techniques, family advocacy, administration and professionalism. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC255V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in the specializations of human environmental sciences.

HESC2603 Food Service Purchasing (Fa) Food purchasing with emphasis on specifications. Relationship of food purchasing to available equipment. Receiving, storage, distribution, and inventory control. Meal quality control and costing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1603 or HESC 1201.

HESC2633 Hotel Operations Management (Fa) Detailed study of different departments within hotel properties. Emphasis on front office, food and beverage, housekeeping, engineering, security, sales and night audit reporting. Prerequisite: HESC 1603.

HESC2643 Principles of Tourism (Sp) Application of economic and regional development concepts and theories to destination product and development. Provides students with a thorough overview of tourism planning at the local, regional and national level while providing a variety of practical planning theories, procedures and tourism guidelines to meet the diverse needs of travelers, destination communities, and hospitality organizations, public, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector. Prerequisite: HESC 1603.

HESC2805 Studio 3: Basic Space Planning and Communication (Fa) An introduction to interior space articulation and the creation of small scale spaces. Components of various presentation methods and formats. Overnight travel requires additional fees. Prerequisites: HESC 1044 and HESC 2853. Corequisite: HESC 2823.

HESC2815 Studio 4: Design Programming (Sp) Studio activities with emphasis on conceptualization, design theory and applications, ideation, programming and computer application. Overnight travel required. Prerequisite: HESC 2805 and HESC 2823.

HESC2823 Interior Design Materials and Resources (Fa) A study of materials and resources used in designing residential and contract interiors. CSI format utilized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: HESC 2805. Prerequisite: HESC 1044 and HESC 2853.

HESC2853 Introduction to Textiles for Interior Designers (Sp) Introduction to textile properties as they apply to interior applications, emphasis on interior serviceability and codes.

HESC2883 History of Interiors (Fa) Study of historic interiors and furniture from antiquity through the present day. Identification of interior styles and furniture of these eras is emphasized.

HESC3003 Apparel Production (Sp, Fa) A study of product development and production and the related vocabulary necessary to communicate professionally within the industry. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1023 and HESC 2013.

HESC3013 Introduction to Fashion Merchandising (Sp, Fa) A study of the retailing of fashion. Included are market structures, store philosophies, job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluation, job application, the resume, interdependencies of the retail store with other segments of the fashion industry. Recommended for students seeking a career in business organizations which produce and/or distribute fashion products and services. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1013 and (AGEC 1103 or ECON 2143).

HESC3033 Fashion Merchandising Methods (Sp, Fa) Exploration of activities associated with the procurement of fashion apparel. A fashion analysis is directed toward apparel demands and the creation of a fashion statement by the use of specific quantitative skills. Course follows fashion item from the designer to the store. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1013 and Math 1203.

HESC3203 Nutrition for Health Professionals and Educators (Sp) Fundamental human nutrition; nutritive value of foods and general functions of nutrients based on concepts derived from inorganic and organic chemistry. Examples relating nutrition to disease used as illustrations to deepen understanding of normal nutrition. Lecture 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1213, CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L.

HESC3213 Dietetic and Nutrition Practice: Tools and Applications (Fa) Standards of practice, ethics, application of interviewing and counseling techniques, medical terminology, documentation in medical records, reimbursement and marketing in the fields of dietetics and nutrition. Prerequisite: HESC 1213. Pre- or Corequisite: HESC 2112 and HESC 2111L.

HESC3401L Child Guidance Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Corequisite: HESC 3402.

HESC3402 Child Guidance (Sp, Fa) Introduction to the guidance system. Focus on discipline techniques that are positive and age/stage appropriate for children ages 3-8. Lecture 2 hours/week plus 1 hour demonstration. Corequisite: HESC 3401L. Prerequisite: HESC 2433.

HESC3423 Adolescent Development (Sp) Physiological and psychological development of the older child and youth, from pre-adolescence to adulthood. Theories of adolescent development. Cross-cultural studies. Peer group influences. Some attention to pathological behaviors. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 or PSYC 2003.

HESC3443 Families in Crisis (Fa) An interdisciplinary perspective on internal and external crises faced by contemporary families, including substance abuse, natural disasters and other crisis events. Students will explore the family processes during such experiences and develop strategies for stress management, coping, and recovery. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC3604 Food Preparation for the Hospitality Industry (Sp, Fa) Preparation and service of food for large groups. Recipe standardization, menu planning, cost control, sanitation, safety, and overall quality assurance. Observation of and experience with quantity food production and use of equipment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: HESC 1213, HESC 2112, HESC 2111L, and HESC 2603.

HESC3613 Resort Management (Sp) Offers a complete approach to the operation of resort properties. Beginning with historical development, details are presented in planning, development, financial investment management, and marketing that deal with the unique nature of resort business. The course also examines the future impact of the condominium concept, time-sharing, technological change, and the increased cost of energy and transportation. Prerequisite: HESC 1603 and HESC 2633.

HESC3623 Legal Issues in the Hospitality Industry (Fa) Introduction to the laws and regulations pertaining to the hospitality industry. The focus is on management responsibilities for the prevention of legal action, understanding federal and state regulations with an emphasis of study of recent litigations. Prerequisite: HESC 1603. (Same as RECR 3873)

HESC3633 Front Office Management (Sp) A systematic approach to hotel/motel front office management. Topics include reservations, greetings and service industry, and career opportunities in the field. Pre or Corequisite: HESC 2633

HESC3653 Food Systems Management (Fa) Organization and management of institutional and hospital food service with focus on functions of management, health codes, and professional development. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1213.

HESC3763L Family Resource Management Laboratory (Fa) Explores management concepts and practices in the lives of individuals and families from a systemic perspective. Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week.

HESC3805 Studio 5: Design and Construction (Fa) Emphasis on residential and commercial building systems and contract documents. Continued development of presentation skills including hand and computer-based techniques. Prerequisite: HESC 2815 and HESC 3843 and a satisfactory portfolio review.

HESC3815 Studio 6: Large Scale Commercial Interiors (Sp) Advanced studio problems involving larger-scale interior spaces for public use. Overnight field trip requires additional fees. Corequisite: HESC 4813 and HESC 4823. Prerequisite: HESC 3805.

HESC3841 Portfolio Workshop (Fa) Preparation of portfolio and materials for interior design profession. Prerequisite: Junior standing in the Interior Design Program. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HESC3843 Building Systems for Interior Design (Sp) Exploration of interior design applications of lighting, electrical, and other building support systems. Prerequisite: HESC 2805. Corequisites: HESC 2815 or equivalent.

HESC400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

HESC4023 Advanced Apparel Merchandising (Sp, Fa) Advanced Apparel Merchandising aspects of fashion through interpretation of apparel classification, seasonal cycles, stock emphasis, assortment strategies, target customers, and apparel trends and an overview of marketing communication including advertising, personal selling and sales promotion. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 3013 and HESC 3033 .

HESC4033 Advanced Textile Study (Sp, Fa) Use of advanced computer-aided-design (CAD) software to enhance skills in textile studies in a computer laboratory environment. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1053 and HESC 2053.

HESC4043 History of Apparel (Fa) The evolution of clothing from ancient times to the twentieth century with emphasis upon Western civilization. Cultural and economic factors affecting dress and customs associated with dress will be stressed. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: ANTH 1023 or SOCI 2013 and HESC 1013.

HESC4053 Contemporary Apparel (Sp) Fashion as a social force, the origin, scope, theory, and history of the fashion business, the materials of fashion, the fashion producers, auxiliary fashion enterprises, designers, fashion leaders, and leading market. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 4043.

HESC4063 Advanced Apparel Production (Sp, Fa) An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Lecture 2 hours and laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 3003 and HESC 2013.

HESC4071 Apparel Studies Pre- Internship (Sp) A study of job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluations, job application, the resume, and portfolio development in preparation for HESC 4082, Apparel Studies Internship. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or consent of instructor.

HESC4082 Apparel Studies Internship (Sp,Su,Fa) A practical experience in a retail store or in a work situation related to the apparel industry to gain insight into the field of apparel merchandising and operations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 2.50 cum GPA and HESC 1053, HESC 2013, HESC 2023, HESC 3003, HESC 3013 and HESC 3033 and HESC 4071 and consent of instructor.

HESC4103 Experimental Foods (Sp) Application of experimental methods for investigations in cookery. Group and individual problems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: HESC 2112 and HESC 2111L and CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L (or HESC 2112 and HESC 2111L and CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L).

HESC4213 Advanced Nutrition (Fa) Normal nutrition with emphasis on utilization of nutrients. Lecture and reports on current literature 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813 and HESC 3203.

HESC4223 Nutrition During the Life Cycle (Fa) Study of normal nutrition emphasizing quantitative needs for nutrients as functions of biologic processes that vary during stages of the life cycle. Nutritive needs during pregnancy and childhood are emphasized with some attention to nourishing aging and elderly adults. Factors that affect food choices and eating behavior are also considered. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1213 and either (BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L or ANSC 3032 or POSC 3032 and ANSC 3042 or POSC 3042) or (CHEM 1074 and CHEM 1071L and BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L).

HESC4243 Community Nutrition (Sp) Identifying, assessing, and developing solutions for nutritional problems encountered at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1213.

HESC425V Food and Nutrition Seminar (Sp) (1-2) Upperclassmen, graduate students and members of faculty meet weekly for presentation and discussion of selected topics. Two credits (2 semesters) required of all foods and nutrition graduate students. Prerequisite: HESC 3203. May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

HESC4264 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (Fa) Principles of nutritional care with emphasis on pathophysiology, assessment, and treatment of chronic illnesses. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Pre- or corequisite: HESC 4213 and HESC 3213. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L (or ANSC or POSC 3042) and CHEM 3813.

HESC4273 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (Sp) Principles of nutritional care with emphasis on pathophysiology, assessment, and treatment in critical illness. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 4264.

HESC4303 Professional Development in Human Environmental Sciences (Sp) Enhancement of the professional and personal development of students by fostering an understanding of the historical and philosophical basis of Human Environmental Sciences, with an emphasis on the interrelationships and integration of the component specialties. Clarification of career goals and development of professional skills.

HESC4313 Building Family and Community Relationships (Sp) This course will help students interested in early childhood to value the role parents play in schools and the role schools play in a community. Various models of parent involvement will be explored. Students will plan a school-community collaborative which values diverse cultures.

HESC4332 Curriculum and Assessment: Birth to Three Years (Sp) The course will introduce students to curriculum planning and assessment in programs serving children from birth to three years of age. Emphasis will be on responsive relationships and curriculum focused on routines and activities. Prerequisite: HESC 1411L, HESC 2402/2401L. Corequisite: HESC 4332L

HESC4332L Curriculum and Assessment: Birth to Three Years Laboratory (Sp) Laboratory. Corequisite: HESC 4332.

HESC4342 Curriculum and Assessment: Three Years through Kindergarten (Fa) Students will plan curriculum and assessment for children three years of age through kindergarten. Emphasis will be on professionalism, philosophy and a code of ethics. Students will interact with young children and facilitate learning and assessment experiences in a program for young children. Prerequisite: HESC 1411L, HESC 3402, and HESC 3402L. Corequisite: HESC 4342L.

HESC4342L Curriculum and Assessment: Three Years through Kindergarten (Fa) Laboratory. Corequisite: HESC 4342.

HESC4373 Field Experience in Birth through Kindergarten Programs (Sp) This course provides the student with interactive and observational experiences with young children in community-based early childhood programs. Prerequisite: HESC 4332, HESC 4332L, HESC 4342, and HESC 4342L.

HESC4423 Adult Development (Fa) Examine individual development beginning with the transition adulthood through middle age; approximate age ranges are 18-60 years. Content focuses on physical, cognitive, psychological, and social changes that occur throughout this period of the life span. The impact of love, work, and family on men's and women's movement through the transitions that comprise adulthood are emphasized. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 or PSYC 2003 and junior standing.

HESC4433 Dynamic Family Interaction (Sp) Examination of family interaction across the lifespan. Methods for enhancing marriage and family relations will be examined. Sources of marital conflict, intergenerational support and negotiations process will be analyzed. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 2413 and junior standing.

HESC4443 Gerontology (Sp) Physiological and psychological development of the aging individual, extended family relations, service networks for the elderly, and retirement activities. Some attention to housing and care needs of persons in advanced years. Lecture 3 hours per week. Seminar. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 (or HESC 2413 or PSYC 2003 or SCWK 2133) and junior standing.

HESC4453 Parenting and Family Dynamics (Sp, Fa) Focus is on influence of parenting and family dynamics on individual development, especially factors in family life which contribute to normal psychological development. Topics include family values, the psychology of sex and pregnancy, the transition to parenthood, childbearing techniques, family influences on cognitive and social development, and changes in family relationships during the life cycle. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 or PSYC 2003.

HESC4463 Administration and Evaluation of Child Development (Fa) Programs Information on planning, developing, operating, and evaluating child development programs. Topics include physical facilities, staff, curriculum, budgets, parent involvement, and education. Lecture and discussion 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 3402 and HESC 3401L and junior standing.

HESC4472 Child Development Practicum (Sp) Interaction with parents and planning, implementing, and evaluating directed experiences with children ages 3-5 in an NAEYC accredited laboratory setting -- U. of A. Nursery School. 2 hours lecture per week. Corequisite: HESC 4472L. Prerequisite: HESC 3402 and HESC 3401L.

HESC4472L Child Development Practicum Laboratory (Sp) Actual experience facilitating children's learning with classroom activities. Participation in planning, implementing, and evaluating individual children and program. 6 hours laboratory per week. Corequisite: HESC 4472. Prerequisite: HESC3402 and HESC3401L.

HESC4483 Internship in Human Development and Family Studies (Sp, Su, Fa) The internship experience provides practical experience for students in settings that are designed to serve the needs of individuals and/or families across the life span. Students must work a minimum of 60 hours per credit hour in the setting. Must be taken no sooner than the summer following completion of junior year. May be taken for an additional 3 hours of elective credit if second experience is distinctly different from first internship. Prerequisite: GPA Greater or Equal to 2.75. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HESC4493 Public Policy Advocacy for Children and Families (Fa) Public policy advocacy as related to children and family issues. Strategies for advocacy will be emphasized. Lecture three hours per week.

HESC455V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-6) Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC4623 Selection and Layout of Food Service Equipment (Sp) Types of food service. Planning food flow from receiving to service of meals. Choosing proper equipment for the flow plan and service items. Sanitation, maintenance, comparison of personnel requirements. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HESC 3604. Prerequisite: HESC 2603.

HESC4633 Advanced Hospitality Operations (Sp) In-depth comprehensive study, strategic planning and analysis of the manager's role in successful hotel operations including application of specialized computer software and human resource management skills. Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: HESC 3633.

HESC4643 Meetings, Events and Convention Management (Fa) Focuses on the planning and management of meetings and conventions in the hospitality industry. Prerequisites: HESC 1603

HESC4653 Global Travel and Tourism Management (Fa) Course recounts the history of travel, explores the future, and discusses the components of tourism from a global perspective. Prerequisite: HESC 1603 and HESC 2643.

HESC4663 Issues & Trends in Hospitality & Tourism (Sp) A study of world trends, issues, and the current state of the industry as well as predictions for the future of lodging, cruise, restaurant, technology, travel and tourism industries with applications to forecasting change in the hospitality and tourism industries. Prerequisite: HESC 1603.

HESC4673 Destination Marketing & Operations (Sp) This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the tasks and processes involved in running a successful destination management organization (DMO). The course places heavy emphasis on destination marketing. Prerequisite: HESC 1603.

HESC4683 Food and Wine Management, Service and Evaluation ( Fa) This course provides students with knowledge of the sensory relationship of wine and food and the important role this process has on gastronomic satisfaction and gastronomic tourism. Course topics will include developing and marketing the wine/food tourism product, wine and food pairing as a hierarchical process, gastronomic identity, Old and New World traditions, managing a food and wine program, trends in food and wine, and promoting Arkansas food and wine. Students must have senior standing and be at least 21 years old. Students are required to complete an alcohol compliance education program prior to taking course. Students who may not imbibe for any reason should speak with the instructor about an accommodation and alternative assignments. Prerequisites: Senior standing, hospitality major, completion of alcohol compliance education program, HESC 2112/2111L, and HESC 2603.

HESC4693 Hospitality Management Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) Managerial experience in hospitality industry focusing on purchasing/production, planning and customer service. ServSafe certification from the National Restaurant Association must be obtained prior to internship. Additional 3 hours credit may be earned if second experience is distinctly different from first internship. Prerequisite: HESC 3604 and HESC 3653. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HESC4753 Family Financial Management (Sp, Fa) Economic considerations of the family in a rapidly changing society. Family finance and consumer problems are emphasized.

HESC4805 Studio 7: Comprehensive Design Process 1 (Fa) Proposal development for interior design studio problems. Emphasis on research and programming as they relate to comprehensive design solutions. Prerequisite: HESC 3815 and HESC 4823.

HESC4811 Internship for Interior Design (Su) Summer supervised work experience and observation of operations/management procedures in approved design, government or service business. Prerequisite: HESC 3815 and HESC 4823.

HESC4813 Human Factors in Interior Design (Sp) (Formerly HESC 3823). Emphasis is given to human behavior as applied to interior design. Types of interior spaces, environmental effects on behavior, ergonomics, interior design needs of special groups, and human factors programs are studied. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HESC 2815. Prerequisite: Completion of any two of the following: ANTH 1023, SOCI 2013 or PSYC 2003.

HESC4815 Studio 8: Comprehensive Design Process II (Sp) Comprehensive design studio synthesizing design skills, knowledge, and critical thinking skills developed in previous design studios, including ideation, programming, construction, and human factors. Prerequisite: HESC 4805.

HESC4823 Professional Practice for Interior Design (Sp) General procedures for operating and maintaining an interior design business. Business documentation, communication and computer application skills, professional responsibilities and ethics. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 3805.

HESC485V Design Tours (Irregular) (1-3) Domestic and international study tours of a variety of design locations that contribute to the body of knowledge. Prerequisite: HESC 1044.

HESC4901 Apparel Studies Pre-Study Tour (Sp) (Even years, Fa) A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for HESC 4912 APST Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

HESC4903 Recent Advances in Manufacturing and Merchandising (Su, Fa) Study of the interaction between manufacturing, marketing, and merchandising in the apparel industry through classroom instruction and study tours. Includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Lecture 3 hours. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

HESC4912 Apparel Studies Study Tour (Su) (Even years, Fa) An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in HESC 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Prerequisite: Minimum 2.0 GPA and HESC 4901. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

HESC5003 Apparel Studies in the Global Economy (Even years, Fa) Analysis of economic, social and political aspects of the domestic and international textile and apparel industries. Lecture 3 hours.

HESC5013 Advanced Apparel Pattern Design (Sp) Use of computer aided design technology to perform pattern making techniques for apparel production. Laboratory 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 3003.

HESC5023 Social, Psychological and Cultural Aspects of Dress (Odd years, Fa) Integration of social, psychological and cultural theories as they apply to appearance and clothing behavior. Lecture 3 hours.

HESC502V Special Problems Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

HESC5033 Issues and Trends in Textile Studies (Odd years, Sp) Studies of advances in textile science and recent developments in the textile industry. Lecture 3 hours.

HESC5043 Theories and Practices in Apparel Merchandising (Even years, Sp) Theoretical perspectives, concepts and current practices that influence apparel merchandising. Lecture 3 hours.

HESC5223 Nutrition During the Life Cycle (Fa) Study of normal nutrition emphasizing quantitative needs for nutrients as functions of biologic processes that vary during stages of the life cycle. Nutritive needs during pregnancy and childhood are emphasized with some attention to nourishing aging and elderly adults. Factors that affect food choices and eating behavior are also considered. Lecture 3 hours per week. On campus and web-based delivery is offered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

HESC522V Readings in Nutrition (Sp) (1-6) Seminar and individual study. Prerequisite: HESC 4213 or HESC 4223 or ANSC 3143.

HESC5264 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (Fa) Principles of nutritional care with emphasis on pathophysiology, assessment and treatment in chronic illnesses. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

HESC5273 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (Sp) Principles of nutritional care with emphasis on pathophysiology, assessment and treatment in chronic illness. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 5264.

HESC5403 Advanced Family Relations (Fa) Subtle elements in marriage, parent-child, and other relations among family members and between the family and the larger community. Recent cultural change as it affects the family. Recent research and literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HESC5423 Theories of Human Development (Fa) Classic and contemporary theories and theoretical issues concerning human development across the life span. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HESC5433 Advanced Child Development (Sp) Theory and research concerning normal behavior and development in childhood. Acquaintance with library resources, classic studies, and recent literature.

HESC5463 Research Methodology in Social Sciences (Sp) Logical structure and the method of science. Basic elements of research design; observation, measurement, analytic method, interpretation, verification, presentation of results. Applications to research in the economic and sociological problems of agriculture and Human Environmental Sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Same as AGED 5463)

HESC5643 Meetings and Convention Management (Fa) Focuses on the planning and management of meetings and conventions in the hospitality industry.

HESC5653 Global Travel and Tourism Management (Fa) The course recounts the history of travel, explores the future, and discusses the components of tourism from a global perspective.

HESC5663 Critical Issues and Trends in Hospitality and Tourism (Sp) The hospitality industry is arguably one of the most important sources of income and foreign exchange and is growing rapidly. However, national and international crises have huge negative economic consequences. This course explores change in the world and applies this to forecasting change in the hospitality and tourism industries. This course examines the current state of the industry and makes educated predictions to the future of the lodging, cruise, restaurant, technology, and travel and tourism industries.

HESC5683 Food and Wine Management, Service and Evaluation (Fa) This course provides students with knowledge of the sensory relationship of wine and food and the important role this process has on gastronomic satisfaction and gastronomic tourism. Course topics will include developing and marketing the wine/food tourism product, wine and food pairing as a hierarchical process, gastronomic identity, Old and New World traditions, managing a food and wine program, trends in food and wine, and promoting Arkansas food and wine. Students must be at least 21 years old. Students are required to complete an alcohol compliance education program prior to taking course. Students who may not imbibe for any reason should speak with the instructor about an accommodation and alternative assignments. Limited to hospitality graduate students only. Prerequisite: Restricted to graduate students in HESC, must be 21 years old, completion of alcohol compliance education program.

HESC600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

HESC700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(HIED) Higher Education

HIED5003 Overview-American Higher Education (Fa) A basic course in the study of higher education open to all students seeking careers in colleges and universities. Serves as an introduction to the programs, problems, issues, and trends in higher education.

HIED5033 College Students and Student Personnel Services (Fa) Study of origins, functions, and policies in student personnel services in contemporary 2- and 4-year colleges and universities with emphasis on the student and student development.

HIED5043 The Student in Higher Education (Sp) Provides those who work or plan to work in post secondary educational institutions with an understanding of the student population in contemporary colleges and universities.

HIED504V Practicum in Higher Education (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Students are assigned to a department or agency within or outside the university for professional experience under the joint supervision of on-site personnel and university faculty. Periodic meetings are scheduled for evaluation, discussion, and examination of techniques.

HIED5053 The Community-Junior College (Irregular) An overview of the community college. Topics include the history and philosophy of the community college movement, students, curriculum, state and local campus governance, teaching, student personnel work, finance and issues, problems, and trends.

HIED5073 Management of Higher Education Institutions (Su, Fa) Principles and concepts of management and their application in college and university settings.

HIED5083 History and Philosophy of Higher Education (Sp) An examination of the history and development of higher education including the study of the philosophy, objectives, and functions of various types of institutions.

HIED5173 Individual and Group Management Skills (Even years, Sp) Development of knowledge, skill, and confidence in personal management, interpersonal relations, and structured group facilitation in a higher education setting. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. For students not enrolled in the Higher Education Leadership program, permission of the instructor.

HIED574V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Supervised field experiences in student personnel services, college administration, academic advising, institutional research, development, or other areas of college and university work.

HIED600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

HIED6013 The Professoriate: Problems and Issues (Sp) An examination of the vital issues and trends affecting college faculty personnel with emphasis upon institutional practices and policies.

HIED6023 Introduction to the Study of Higher Education (Sp, Fa) A requirement for all new doctoral and specialist students. Familiarization with writing requirements, library search procedures, library resources, and program requirements. Prerequisite: Admission to Higher Education program (Ed.S. & Ed.D.)

HIED605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Provides students with an opportunity to pursue special study in higher education.

HIED6083 Management Skills for Effective Leadership (Irregular) Development of management skills that enhance leadership includes understanding yourself, managing yourself, team building, personnel selection, group and individual decision-making, problem solving, managing conflict, developing valid performance appraisal systems, conducting performance appraisal interview, and other topics of current interest. Prerequisite: Doctoral students in Higher Education or permission of the instructor.

HIED6093 Leading Change (Irregular) An in-depth examination of leadership, change, and culture in postsecondary education.

HIED6183 Organization Development and Change in Higher Education (Irregular) An examination of the theory and practice of organization development as it relates to planned change in colleges and universities.

HIED6323 Design and Evaluation of College Teaching (Irregular) Theory and practice of effective college teaching. Emphasis is placed on preparation and evaluation of instruction.

HIED6343 Strategies for Effective College Teaching (Even years, Sp) An examination of traditional and innovative instructional strategies for use in college teaching.

HIED6423 Trends, Issues and Problems in Higher Education (Odd years, Fa) A study of the current problems and trends related to the field of higher education.

HIED6653 Legal Aspects of Higher Education (Sp) An examination of the legal status of higher education in the United States; the rights and responsibilities of educators and students including fair employment; due process; torts liability and contracts; student rights landmark court decisions; federal and state legislation having an impact on education.

HIED6663 Finance and Fiscal Management (Sp) Higher education finance and budgeting practices: problems, issues, trends, and policy issues in higher education.

HIED6683 Governance and Policy Making in Higher Education (Odd years, Fa) An analysis of governance and policy making affecting the control of colleges and universities. Attention is given to policy generation, governing board supervision, and the impact of institutional, professional, and regional groups as well as community, state, and federal pressures.

HIED6693 Research Techniques in Higher Education (Irregular) Techniques of research applicable to Higher Education

HIED674V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Supervised field experiences in student personnel services, college administration, college teaching, institutional research, development, or other areas of college and university work.

HIED699V Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) A series of seminar for specialized study into areas of current significance in postsecondary education, such as leadership and planning; organization, development, and change; human resource development and appraisal; the student in higher education; etc. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIED700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(HIST) History

HIST1003 Institutions and Ideas of Western Civilization I (Sp, Su, Fa) Examination of major themes of Western history from the Ancient Near East through the Reformation and an evaluation of their contribution to contemporary life and culture.

HIST1013 Institutions and Ideas of Western Civilization II (Sp, Su, Fa) Examination of major themes of Western history since the Reformation and an evaluation of their contribution to contemporary life and culture.

HIST1113 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I (Irregular) Introduces the major civilizations of the world in their historical context to 1500.

HIST1113H Honors Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I (Irregular) Study of Western and non-Western civilizations.

HIST1123 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II (Irregular) Introduces the major civilizations of the world in their historical context, since 1500.

HIST1123H Honors Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II (Irregular) Study of Western and non-Western civilizations

HIST2003 History of the American People to 1877 (Sp, Su, Fa) A history of American life encompassing constitutional, political, social, intellectual and economic development from prior to European colonization to 1877.

HIST2003H Honors History of the American People to 1877 (Sp, Su, Fa) A history of American life encompassing constitutional, political, social, intellectual and economic development from prior to European colonization to 1877. Particular emphasis will be placed on the evolution of American political institutions.

HIST2013 History of the American People, 1877 to Present (Sp, Su, Fa) A history of American life encompassing constitutional, political, social, intellectual and economic development from Reconstruction to the present.

HIST2013H Honors History of the American People, 1877 to Present (Sp, Su, Fa) A history of American life encompassing constitutional, political, social, intellectual and economic development from Reconstruction to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on the evolution of American political institutions.

HIST3003 History of Christianity (Irregular) This course surveys the theological, political, and cultural history of Mediterranean Christianity, c. 30-600 CE. Special topics include patristics, Christianity and Empire, and the formation of Christian sacred space.

HIST300V Internship in History (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Work experience in a historical agency arranged by the student under the guidance of a faculty member. Paper required. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST3023 The Islamic West, 650-1600 C.E. (Irregular) History of Islamic North Africa and Spain from the Islamic conquest to the beginning of the modern period (CE 650-1600).

HIST3033 Islamic Civilization (Irregular) A survey of the foundation, evolution, and distinctive character of Islam, with attention to religion, literature, art, architecture, science, and political society. Particular attention given to the development of Islamic doctrines, sectarian movements, and systematic theology. Concludes with a look at Islamic resurgence movements and their place in the contemporary world.

HIST3043 History of the Modern Middle East (Irregular) Examines the history of the Islamic Middle East from the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Persian empires up to World War I and then concludes with the issues and patterns of 20th century Middle Eastern political and socio-economic life. Topics include Islam and politics, Arab nationalism, Western imperialism, the Arab-Zionist conflict, petroleum politics, and modernization vs. traditionalism.

HIST3063 Military History (Irregular) Survey of the basic principles and problems of strategy, tactics, and military organization from Alexander the Great to the present. Special attention will be given to the operation of these factors in the American Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, the American Civil War, and World War II.

HIST3083 Women and Christianity (Irregular) From Paul to the mystics of the late medieval church, this course considers women's religious expression, symbolic action, interaction with holy men, and their relationship with the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Other important questions include women's institutional subordination opportunities for autonomous action.

HIST3203 Colonial Latin America (Odd years, Fa) An introduction to the social, cultural, political and economic formation of Latin America, during the period from 1492 to the movements for independence.

HIST3213 Modern Latin America (Even years, Sp) An investigation of the varying courses of modernization in Latin America, covering popular revolution, urban populism and military dictatorship.

HIST3223 Violence and Conflict in Latin American History (Even years, Fa) This course analyzes the history of Latin America since European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. Using films and literature, as well as historical texts, the course examines themes of nationalism, civil war, banditry, urbanization, military dictatorships, human rights abuses, and guerrilla insurgencies.

HIST3233 African American History to 1877 (Fa) The course will study the African beginnings, the Caribbean and Latin American influences, and the African American early struggle to survive slavery in the new world, and the continuing social, political, and economical quest to become a first class citizen in American society until Reconstruction, 1492-1877.

HIST3243 African American History Since 1877 (Sp) The course will study the major social, political, and economical issues relating to the African American experience beginning with the late post-Reconstruction period and will include, all of the major personalities and influences in the Civil Rights Movement, from 1877 to the present.

HIST3253 The History of Sub-Saharan Africa (Fa) Sub-Saharan African history from the 18th century to the present, with emphasis on the impact of the slave trade, colonization, Independence, and contemporary issues of the post-colonial period. Examination of the ways Africans experienced change in terms of culture, society, economics, gender, religion, politics, and labor.

HIST3263 History of the American Indian (Fa) Survey of North American Indian history from their arrival include pre-Columbian Indian history, the interaction of Indian and white societies, U.S. Government policy, and the role of Indians in modern American culture.

HIST3323 The West of the Imagination (Irregular) The changing image of the American West from the colonial period to the present and how popular impressions have reflected national attitudes and values. Special attention given to the West's portrayal in folklore, literature, art, films, and television.

HIST3383 Arkansas and the Southwest (Sp, Fa) Political, economic, social, and cultural development of Arkansas from the coming of the Indian to the 20th century, with special emphasis on Arkansas as a national and regional component.

HIST3443 Modern Imperialism (Odd years, Fa) Examines the causes, nature, and consequences of modern imperialism. The histories of five different empires are studied and compared to give an overview of the phenomenon.

HIST3453 Modern Terrorism (Irregular) Examines the historical foundations and course of modern terrorism, from the French Revolution to the present. Special attention is given to the Irish Republican Army, Baader Meinhoff Gang (Red Army Faction), the American militia movement, and al-Qaeda.

HIST3473 Palestine and Israel in Modern Times (Irregular) History of 19th-20th Century Palestine, Zionism and the founding of modern Israel, and the Palestine-Israel conflict in local and regional perspective.

HIST3503 Far East in Modern Times (Irregular) Introduction to fundamental aspects of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese history since about 1860.

HIST3533 World War II (Sp) Study of the causes, conduct and consequences of the Second World War.

HIST3583 The United States and Vietnam, 1945-1975 (Fa) A survey and analysis of the Vietnam War with special emphasis on its impact on American and Indochinese society.

HIST3593 The Unraveling of America: Life in the 1960s (Irregular) A study of the main themes and dominant forces shaping American history during the 1960s; social and cultural as well as political and economic history are emphasized. Topics include the civil rights movement, the Great Society and the Vietnam War as well as the counterculture, rock music and the re-emergence of feminism.

HIST3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in history).

HIST3973H Honors Methods (Sp) A practical introduction to historical research and writing. Examines research methods and current theories of interpreting and evaluating the past. Prepares students for honors thesis development and writing. Required for and restricted to history honors students. Prerequisite: Junior standing as honors history major.

HIST398V Special Topics (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Historical topics which are not usually presented in depth in regular courses.

HIST399VH Honors History Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

HIST4003 Greece and the Ancient Near East (Irregular) An introduction to the origins of civilization in the ancient Near East and Greece. Emphasis placed upon the development of agriculture and cities, Hebrew religious ethics, and Greek culture, political institutions, and thought.

HIST4013 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World (Irregular) A survey of the achievements of Alexander and the culture of the new world he created. The personality and career of Alexander are examined as well as the rich diversity of the Hellenistic world: trade with India, religious syncretism, and the development of Hellenistic science and philosophy.

HIST4023 The Roman Republic and Empire (Even years, Fa) An introduction to Rome's cultural development from its origins as a small city state in the 8th century B.C. to its rule over a vast empire extending from Scotland to Iraq. Emphasis is placed upon the causes of Roman expansion during the Republic, the urbanization and Romanization of Western Europe, and the persecution and spread of Christianity.

HIST4043 Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (Even years, Fa) This course examines the political, spiritual, intellectual, and social-economic developments of European history, c. 300-1000 CE. Special topics include the Christianization of the late Roman Empire and Byzantium, as well as the formation of Celtic and Germanic Kingdoms in the West.

HIST4053 Late Middle Ages (Odd years, Sp) This course examines the political, social-economic, intellectual, and spiritual developments of European history, c. 1000-1400 CE. Special topics include monasticism, sacral kingship, the crusades, and the medieval university.

HIST4073 Renaissance and Reformation, 1300-1600 (Even years, Fa) Examines the history of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages through the Renaissance to the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. Special attention is paid to changes in popular piety, political thought, religious representation, and the discovery of the New World.

HIST4083 Early Modern Europe, 1600-1800 (Odd years, Sp) Begins with the upheaval of the reformation, moves through the crisis of the 17th century and culminates with the democratic revolution of the 18th century. Examines the consolidation of the European state system, the propagation of modern science, discovery of overseas worlds, and the advent of the Industrial Revolution.

HIST4093 The History of African Americans and Social Justice (Even years, Fa) Explores how the United States has extended social justice to African Americans during the nation's history. Examines social justice for blacks and the impact of historic policies and practices on black life today.

HIST4103 Europe in the 19th Century (Irregular) European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I, with emphasis on political and diplomatic history.

HIST4113 Twentieth Century Europe, 1898-1939 (Irregular) Background and impact of World War I to the outbreak of World War II.

HIST4133 Society and Gender in Modern Europe (Odd years, Sp) Changing values and attitudes toward childhood, family life, sexuality, and gender roles in Europe from the Renaissance to the present. The social impact of the Industrial Revolution, urbanization, demographic change, and the two world wars.

HIST4143 Intellectual History of Europe Since the Enlightenment (Even years, Fa) A survey of the major developments in European thought and culture since the emergence of Romanticism. Topics include Romanticism, Darwinism, Marxism, and Modernism.

HIST4153 Modern Ireland, 1798-1948 (Irregular) Examines the course of Irish history from the 1798 United Irishmen rebellion to the 1948 declaration of the Republic of Ireland. Special attention is given to Catholic emancipation, the Great Famine, the Home Rule movements, the Irish War of Independence, and the Emergency (Second World War).

HIST4163 Tudor-Stuart England, 1485-1714 (Even years, Sp) Examines the history of the British Isles from the ascension of Henry VII and the Tudor dynasty until the close of the Stuart Era in 1714. Special attention is given to the English Reformation, the Elizabethan years, the 17th Century Revolutions, and the birth of an overseas Empire.

HIST4173 The Latin American City (Irregular) This course examines the social, political, and cultural aspects of the modern Latin American city from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course includes an introduction to urban studies concepts, and each semester is organized around a specific set of case studies.

HIST4183 Great Britain, 1707-1901 (Even years, Fa) Examines the history of the British Isles from the 1707 Act of Union between Scotland and England until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901. Special attention is given to the spread of Empire, industrialization, and the political, social, and cultural aspects of the Georgian and Victorian Eras.

HIST4193 Great Britain,1901-2001 (Odd years, Sp) Examines the history of the British Isles from the death of Queen Victoria in 1901 to the reelection of Prime Minister Tony Blair in 2001. Special attention is given to the collapse of the British Empire, the birth of the welfare state, and the challenges inherent in the decline of British world power.

HIST4213 The Era of the French Revolution (Odd years, Fa) France from the salons of the Enlightenment to the Napoleonic Wars. The French Revolution will be explored in terms of politics and personalities, ideas and symbols, class and gender relations, and violence and terror.

HIST4223 France Since 1815 (Even years, Sp) Survey of French history from the overthrow of Napoleon to the 5th Republic, with emphasis on French politics, society, and culture.

HIST4243 Germany, 1789-1918 (Even years, Fa) Survey of Germany from Age of Absolutism to collapse of the Hohenzollern monarchy with emphasis upon political, social, and economic developments.

HIST4253 History of Germany, 1918-1949 (Irregular) Survey of Germany from advent of the Weimar Republic to 1949 with emphasis upon the failure of democratic government in the 1920s, the National Socialist dictatorship, and the division of Germany into two separate states.

HIST4263 Independence and Africa Today (Sp) Examines the last half-century of Africa's history, focusing on the last few decades. Introduction of Africa's colonial past, revolutions and struggles for independence. Review of African development in the post-colonial and contemporary era, successes and failures of independent Africa, and the challenges the continent faces today.

HIST4283 Russia to 1861 (Fa) Study of the political, social and cultural development of Russia through the Napoleonic invasion.

HIST4293 Russia Since 1861 (Sp) Survey of political, cultural and intellectual trends in modern Russia with emphasis upon the Revolutions of 1917, the Soviet Union, and its successor states.

HIST4313 Islamic Theology and Philosophy, 650-1700 (Irregular) Doctrines and main figures in Islamic theology and philosophy from the origins of Islam through the seventeenth century C.E.

HIST4333 Modern Islamic Thought (Irregular) Main currents in Islamic theology and political philosophy from the Ottoman Empire to the end of the twentieth century.

HIST4353 Middle East, 600-1250 (Even years, Fa) An examination of the origins of modern Middle Eastern societies-Arabic, Turkish, and Persian-with emphasis upon the development of the Islamic faith and culture.

HIST4363 The Middle East since 1914 (Irregular) Middle East sine 1914 addresses European colonialism, the rise of new social elites, independence, revolution, globalization, economic self-determination, persistent regional conflicts and ongoing battles over "cultural authenticity".

HIST4373 Mongol & Mamluk Middle East 1250-1520 (Even years, Sp) An examination of Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, and Iran in the period of the Turco-Mongol military elites. Special attention given to the rise of slave and free governments and their roles in shaping Middle East political and social patterns.

HIST4383 The American Civil Rights Movement (Irregular) Introduction to the history and development of the civil rights movement in the United States. (Same as AAST 4383)

HIST4393 The Ottoman Empire and Iran 1300-1722 (Odd years, Sp) An examination of Ottoman government and society in the {Classical Period}as well as a survey of Iranian history from 1300 to 1722. Special attention given to the Ottoman ruling structure, religious-legal establishment, and Ottoman conquests in the Balkans and Arab world.

HIST4413 New Women in the Middle East (Irregular) This course covers the transformation of social and cultural roles of women in the Middle East since the 19th Century. Emphases include political emancipation, religious reformation, artistic representation, and gendered re-definition.

HIST4433 Social and Cultural History of the Modern Middle East (Irregular) An analysis of Middle East history in the 17th-20th centuries which focuses on the social transformation of urban and rural life. Particular emphasis is given to the roles of economics, genealogy, art, and popular culture.

HIST4463 The American Frontier (Odd years, Fa) American westward expansion and its influence on national institutions and character. Emphasis on the pioneer family and the frontier's role in shaping American society, culture, economy, and politics. Topics include exploration, the fur trade, the cattle kingdom and the mining, farming, and military frontiers.

HIST4483 African American Biographies (Irregular) Introduction to the history and intellectual development of famous and not-so-famous African Americans. (Same as AAST 4483)

HIST4493 Religion in America to 1860 (Irregular) History of religion in early America, primarily from a social and cultural perspective. Topics will include region, social class, growth of institutions, slavery, print culture, and social reform in traditions including Protestantism, West African religion, Catholicism, Native American religion, and Judaism.

HIST4503 History of Political Parties in the United States, 1789-1896 (Even years, Fa) Origin and development of the American party system from the implementation of the constitution to the election of McKinley. (Same as HIST 4483,PLSC 4303)

HIST4513 History of Political Parties in the United States Since 1896 (Odd years, Sp) Response of the party system to America's emergence as an industrial nation and world power from the election of 1896 to present. (Same as PLSC 4313)

HIST4533 American Social and Intellectual History to 1865 (Even years, Fa) Survey of significant ideas and institutions from Colonial times through the Civil War with emphasis upon religious, educational, literary, and scientific developments.

HIST4543 American Social and Intellectual History Since 1865 (Odd years, Sp) Survey of thought and society since the Civil War.

HIST4563 The Old South, 1607-1865 (Odd years, Fa) Survey of the political, social, and economic development of the antebellum South.

HIST4573 The New South, 1860 to the Present (Even years, Fa) Survey of the development of the Civil War and postwar South to the present.

HIST4583 Arkansas in the Nation (Sp) Designed to provide advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a comprehensive understanding of the full sweep of Arkansas history. The focus will be on social, economic and political history, and historiography.

HIST4603 U.S. Labor History to 1877 (Odd years, Fa) Examines the changing nature of work in U.S. history from 1607 until 1877 including the ways that workers--individually and collectively-- understand the meanings of their labor and to the ways that notions of class, gender, ethnicity, and race inform these understandings.

HIST4613 Colonial America to 1763 (Irregular) Political, economic, and social history of colonial development from the time of contact to the Treaty of Paris, with primary, but not exclusive, emphasis upon Anglo-America.

HIST4623 Revolutionary America, 1763 to 1801 (Irregular) Political, economic, and social history of Revolutionary and post-Revolutionary America and the evolution of the new nation, with a particular emphasis upon the emergence on constitutional traditions.

HIST4643 Early American Republic, 1801-1828 (Irregular) History of the early United States emphasizing social and cultural perspectives. Topics addressed will include westward expansion, slavery, religion, and economic change.

HIST4653 Antebellum America, 1828-1850 (Irregular) History of antebellum U.S. emphasizing social and cultural perspectives. Topics addressed will include slavery, religion, gender, the market economy, regionalism, and political developments.

HIST4663 Rebellion to Reconstruction, 1850-1877 (Irregular) A survey of political, social, and economic issues from the late antebellum period through Reconstruction. Emphasis is placed on the causes of the Civil War and the problems of postwar America. A brief examination of the Civil War is included.

HIST4673 The American Civil War (Fa) An intensive study of the political, social, military, and economic aspects of the American Civil War period.

HIST4683 The Business Corporation in American Life and Thought (Irregular) The legal, social and political background of the business corporation, seeking explanations as to why the corporation became the dominant form of economic organization by the late nineteenth century. The course will also examine the social and political effects of corporate power.

HIST4703 Emergence of Modern America, 1876-1917 (Odd years, Fa) A survey of the impact of the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, and progressivism upon American life and institutions.

HIST4723 America Between the Wars, 1917-1941 (Irregular) The impact of World War I, the 1920s, and the Great Depression upon American society and culture.

HIST4733 Recent America, 1941 to the Present (Irregular) A general survey of American history since World War II with emphasis upon the presidency, reform movements, the Cold War, and cultural developments.

HIST4753 Diplomatic History of the United States, 1776-1900 (Even years, Fa) Survey of American foreign relations from the American Revolution through the Spanish-American War. Principal topics include isolationism, freedom of the seas, manifest destiny and continental expansion, overseas expansion, and the diplomacy of war and peace. Emphasis on the relationship between domestic politics and foreign affairs. Prerequisite: HIST 2003.

HIST4763 Diplomatic History of the United States, 1900-1945 (Odd years, Sp) America's development as a world power. The course examines U.S. relations with Europe, Latin America, and East Asia, plus America's first approach to the Middle East. Particular emphasis is placed on America's involvement in World War I and World War II. Prerequisite: HIST 2013.

HIST4773 Diplomatic History of the US, 1945 to Present (Odd years, Fa) U.S. involvement in world affairs since WWII. The Cold War from an international perspective, including strategies, nuclear deterrence, conflicts, economic developments, cultural relations among allies and adversaries. Post-Cold War scenarios, including war on terrorism.

HIST4783 History of Modern Mexico (Odd years, Sp) This course examines the history of Mexico from the wars of independence to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the turbulent nineteenth century and the Mexican Revolution. Themes covered include colonial legacies, national identities, popular culture, emigration, and relations with the United States.

HIST4793 Colonial India, 1758-1948 ( Irregular) Examines the course of Indian history from the 1758 Battle of Plassey to eventual independence from Great Britain in 1948. Special attention is given to India's place within the British Empire, particularly the East Indian Company, the Indian Mutiny, the Raj, the rise of Gandhi, and India's independence movement.

HIST4813 History of China to 1644 (Fa) (Formerly HIST 4313) A history of pre-modern China, including the study of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism.

HIST4823 Modern China (Sp) Survey of Chinese culture, society, government and diplomacy between1644 and the present.

HIST4843 Modern Japan (Irregular) (Formerly HIST 4843) Survey of Japanese history since 1859 to the downfall of Tokugawa shogunate through the two world wars to the rise of an economic superpower. Emphasis is placed on Japanese economic, social, and political questions, including their successes and costs.

HIST4893 Senior Capstone Seminar (Fa) Required for all history majors. Examines research methods and current theories of interpreting and evaluating the past. Emphasizes skills of analysis, synthesis, and integration. Students produce a primary source-based research paper. A grade of a B or better will satisfy the Fulbright senior writing requirement. Prerequisite: History major; senior standing.

HIST4943 U.S. Labor History, from 1877-present (Even years, Sp) This course will examine the changing nature of work in U.S. history from 1877 until the present. It will pay particular attention to the ways that workers--individually and collectively--understand the meanings of their labor and to the ways that notions of class, gender, ethnicity, and race inform these understandings.

HIST498V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

HIST5023 Historical Methods (Fa) Practical introduction to historical research and writing. Consists of lecture, library reading, and class criticism of research papers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST5043 Historiography (Irregular) Survey of the history of historical writing and a study of the important schools and historical interpretation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST5053 Reading Seminar in Asian History (Irregular) Concentrated reading in selected specialized areas of Asian history. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST506V Readings in European History (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST507V Readings in American History (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST508V Research Problems in European History (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST509V Research Problems in American History (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST5103 Reading Seminar in American History (Irregular) Historiographical and bibliographical study of special areas of U.S. history, such as the Age of Jackson, the Civil War, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST510V Readings in Latin America History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST511V Research Problems in Latin American History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST5123 Research Seminar in American History (Irregular) Research projects in selected fields of American history, such as the Civil War, the Age of Jackson, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST512V Readings in African History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST5133 Reading Seminar in European History (Irregular) Historiographical and bibliographical study of special periods in European history, such as the Roman Empire, the late Middle Ages, the French Revolution, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST513V Research Problems in African History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST5143 Research Seminar in European History (Sp, Su, Fa) Research projects in selected fields of European history, such as the French Revolution, humanism, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST514V Readings in Middle Eastern History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST5153 Reading Seminar in British History (Irregular) (3-6) Historiographical and bibliographical study of selected periods of British history.

HIST515V Research Problems in Middle Eastern History (Irregular) (1-6)

HIST5163 Research Seminar in British History (Irregular) Research projects in selected fields of British history. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST517V Readings in Asian History (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST519V Readings in Ancient Near Eastern History (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST520V Research Problems in Ancient Near Eastern History (Irregular) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST5213 Reading Seminar in Middle Eastern History (Irregular) Historiographical and bibliographical study of special areas of Middle Eastern history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST5233 Research Seminar in Middle Eastern History (Irregular) Research projects in selected fields of Middle Eastern history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HIST5313 Reading Seminar in Latin American History (Irregular) Historiographical and bibliographical study of special areas in Latin American history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST5323 Research Seminar in Latin American History (Irregular) A research seminar for the production of a major research project in Latin American history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST5413 Reading Seminar in African History (Irregular) (3-6) Historiographical and bibliographical study of selected periods and/or topics in African history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST5423 Research Seminar in African History (Irregular) (3-6) A seminar for the production of a major research project in selected fields of African history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HIST600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

(HKRD) Health Sciences, Kinesiology, Recreation & Dance

HKRD5353 Research in Health Science, Kinesiology, Recreation and Dance (Sp, Su, Fa) Methods and techniques of research in health education, physical education and recreation including an analysis of examples of their use and practice in their application to problems of interest to the student.

HKRD5873 Leadership in HKRD Services (Su) Considers research, theory, and practical applications of leadership principles utilized in the provision of HKRD services. Focus is on motivation, attitude, communication, group dynamics, and problem solving.

HKRD5883 Sports Facilities Management (Sp) Considers basic elements and procedures in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of sport facilities; management considerations in conducting various types of events.

HKRD5893 Public and Private Finance in HKRD (Fa) Develops an understanding of both public and private finance management for students in public and private management positions. Provides an understanding of the budgeting processes and techniques used in obtaining and controlling funds, including private sector finance problems in areas of credit, pricing, indexing, and debt management.

HKRD6133 Issues in HKRD (Irregular) A review of the significant social, demographic, behavioral, developmental, and technological issues that influence health, kinesiology, and recreation programs. Pre- or Corequisite: for doctoral level students only.

HKRD6233 Management in HKRD (Irregular) Deals with principles, procedures, relationships, problems, and current practices in the supervision of health education and kinesiology. Includes management of facilities, programs, personnel, and processes.

HKRD689V Directed Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Laboratory investigations, in basic and applied research.

HKRD699V Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HKRD700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(HLSC) Health Sciences

HLSC1002 Wellness Concepts (Sp, Fa) Interrelationship of mental, emotional, physical, social, and spiritual aspects of functioning to optimal health and wellness; implications for education about wellness in the schools and for adult living are provided.

HLSC1103 Personal Health and Safety (Sp, Fa) Health and safety problems with emphasis on the promotion of individual health and safety.

HLSC1203 Prevention of Drug Abuse (Fa) Provides an overview of drugs of use and abuse in society. Also assists the student in evaluating drug abuse prevention approaches for public, private, or community settings.

HLSC1303 Introduction to Human Sexuality (Sp) An examination of human sexuality with a critical analysis of male and female attitudes and values affecting self-understanding and gender identity.

HLSC2101 Special Topics (Sp, Fa) Examination and application of health promotion concepts based on individualized health hazard appraisal. (Not to replace content courses leading to teacher certification in health education). May be repeated for up to 5 hours of degree credit.

HLSC2613 Foundations of Community Health (Sp) History and philosophy of health education discipline; organization and administration of health education programs; curriculum development and evaluation of educational efforts; and student observation in school and non-school settings.

HLSC2662 Terminology for the Health Professions (Sp, Fa) Emphasis is on word roots and combined forms of words describing various facets of health and disease. Descriptive definitions with application of practical significance included for the health professional.

HLSC310V Readings in Health Science (Irregular) (1-3) Synthesis and critical analysis of current literature in the health sciences. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

HLSC3613 Methods and Materials in Health Education and Safety (Irregular) Methods and materials; planning and organizing instruction; preparation of teaching units. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

HLSC3633 First Responder-First Aid (Sp, Su, Fa) Prepares persons to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency aid to victims of serious bleeding, poisoning, shock, fracture, and other forms of injury until emergency medical services personnel arrive at the scene.

HLSC3643 Community Health Planning and Promotion (Even years, Fa) Emphasis on community analysis; defining and verifying community health problems; establishing program goals; defining and assessing health behaviors; formulating educational goals, objectives, methods, and activities; promoting programs; and designing program evaluation.

HLSC3663 Principles and Practice of Mental Health Promotion (Odd years, Fa) Understanding and practicing the principles of sound mental health are key elements in achieving high level wellness. This course encourages students' exploration of the mental dimensions of holistic health and presents strategies to achieve a more healthful balance in life.

HLSC3673 Teacher Drug Education (Fa) Specifically for educators; provides an overview of drugs of use, misuse, and abuse in society, and assists the educator in developing a sequential drug education program in public, private, or community educational settings.

HLSC3683 Health Care Consumerism (Even years, Sp) Study of products and services provided by the health care delivery system; an analysis of those components lacking scientific credibility, yet promoted for the maintenance or restoration of health status.

HLSC3683H Honors Health Care Consumerism (Even years, Sp) Study of products and services provided by the health care delivery system; an analysis of those components lacking scientific credibility, yet promoted for the maintenance or restoration of health status.

HLSC404V Community Health Preceptorship (Sp, Su, Fa) (6-12) Designed to provide the student with an extended work experience in a selected community health program. The student works under college supervision with a professional in the health care delivery field. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

HLSC4603 Application of Health Behavior Theories in Health Education (Odd years, Sp) Understanding the reasons for health behavior is vital for the health education professional. It is necessary to assist in the development of services and programs that are likely to move an individual from an unhealthy behavior to one that is more appropriate for a healthy lifestyle. This course surveys the major health behavior theories used in health education and applications of the theories will be used in the class.

HLSC4613 Principles of Epidemiology (Fa) Distribution and patterns of disease or physiological conditions within populations; an examination of the nature of epidemiological research. Prerequisite: Senior standing and BIOL 2013 and BIOL 2011L. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HLSC4623 Human Diseases (Fa) (Formerly HLSC 3623) An examination of the variety, behavior, distribution, and management of both infectious and noninfectious diseases in human populations. Prerequisite: BIOL 1603 (or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L).

HLSC5353 Health Counseling (Fa) A review of the role and function of the health counselor including a focus on problem solving approaches for coping with daily problems of living, decision making, and life style planning.

HLSC5543 Contemporary Issues in Human Sexuality (Irregular) Indepth analysis of the social, biological, and behavioral factors associated with the development of one's sexuality.

HLSC5563 Public Health: Practices and Planning (Sp) Acquaints the student with the structure, functions, and current problems in public health and with the role of education in public health. Prevention and control practices and planning will be emphasized.

HLSC5573 Principles of Health Education (Fa) Current trends, basic issues, controversial issues, and fundamental principles of health education.

HLSC5623 Health Planning (Even Years, Sp) Emphasis is on examination of health planning processes, principles, and concepts. Methods for health planning agencies, issues in comprehensive health planning, and analysis of decision making steps for program implementation will be addressed.

HLSC5633 Health Services Administration (Irregular) Emphasis is on an examination of administrative factors related to health services. Administrative and professional authority, boards, consumers, delivery of services, federal role, and cost containment will also be addressed.

HLSC574V Internship (Irregular) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HLSC589V Independent Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Development, implementation, and completion of graduate research project. Prerequisite: M.S. degree in Health Science and HPER 5353 and EDFD 5393.

HLSC605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Provides students with an opportunity to pursue special study of education problems. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HLSC6333 Health Behavior Research (Even years, Fa) A review of human behavior and its relationship to health and well being. Focuses on contemporary health behavior research and instrumentation.

HLSC6553 Environmental Health (Odd years, Fa) An analysis and evaluation of the various environmental factors that influence our health. Causes of problem factors are identified and solutions proposed for improving environmental conditions.

HLSC6733 Health and the Aging Process (Odd Years, Sp) An overview of the health-related issues facing elderly populations with indepth study of the biological and behavioral changes associated with aging.

HLSC674V Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Provide Ph.D. students with an individualized college teaching experience in collaboration with a faculty mentor. Enrollment concurrent with residency. Prerequisite: admission to the Ph.D. in Health Science degree program. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HLSC6803 Health Communication Theory, Research and Practice (Odd years, Sp) This course is designed to acquaint you with the role of communication in health education and with basic principles and practices in interpersonal, group, and mass communication. Health communication theory will be discussed in the first part of the semester, followed by important research in the area of health communication, and finally putting to practice the material will be the terminal experience for the course.

HLSC6833 Principles of Epidemiology II (Even years, Sp) Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to design, conduct, and interpret observational epidemiological concepts, sources of data, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, methods of sampling, estimating sample size, questionnaire design, and effects of measurement error. Prerequisite: EDFD 5393 or EDFD 6403.

HLSC699V Seminar (Irregular) (1-3) Discussion of selected topics and review of current literature in the health sciences. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

(HNED) Honors Education

HNED3001H Honors Education Thesis Tutorial (Sp, Su, Fa) Designed to provide the foundation for the Honors Thesis. Students and faculty tutors work "one-on-one" exploring a specific topic which has been agreed upon by the student and the professor. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HNED3923H Honors Education Seminar (Irregular) Special topics or issues in education for the Honors student. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy.

HNED400VH Honors Education Thesis/Project (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Prerequisite: Honors candidacy and HNED 3001H.

(HORT) Horticulture

HORT1103 Plants in the Home Environment (Fa) A course describing the aesthetic, nutritional and health value, and other importance of plants to humans. The course will highlight the use and importance of plants and gardening through the ages, study significant gardens to humankind, and introduce students to using plants to their benefit. The use of color, texture, aroma and flavor in the home and landscape will be presented. Basic home gardening, plant care and use will be discussed and practiced.

HORT2003 Principles of Horticulture (Sp, Fa) A course introducing students to the biological and technologies underlying the propagation, production, handling and use of horticultural crops, turf and landscape plants. Students will be introduced to the various disciplines and commodities of horticulture. The use of plants for the benefit of humankind because of their aesthetic and nutritional value will be explored. Previous instruction in Plant Science, Plant Biology, or general Botany is strongly encouraged. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours, drill 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

HORT2303 Introduction to Turfgrass Management (Fa) An introductory course in turfgrass management emphasizing turfgrass growth, adaptation, and management. Methods for establishment, fertilization, mowing, cultivation, irrigation, and pest management are presented, and their impact on culture of lawns, golf courses, athletic fields, and other managed turf areas discussed.

HORT3103 Woody Landscape Plants (Fa) Identification, climatic adaptation and landscape design values of woody ornamental trees, shrubs and vines. Lecture 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

HORT3113 Herbaceous and Indoor Plant Materials (Odd years, Sp) Identification, culture, and use of annuals, perennials in landscapes and foliage plants in interiors. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

HORT3303 Vegetable Crops (Even years, Sp) General course in vegetable crops with attention to the principles underlying methods of production and handling related to yields and quality of the products. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: HORT 2003 and CSES 2203.

HORT3403 Commercial and Residential Turfgrass Management (Even years, Sp) Cultural and management practices of commercial and residential lawns. Principles and practices of mowing, fertilizing, irrigating, and control of weed, disease, and insects. Identification of turfgrass; equipment selection. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: HORT 2303.

HORT3901 Horticultural Career Development (Sp) A course which presents concepts necessary for developing a career and becoming a professional in horticulture industries or businesses. Concepts of goal setting, effective communication and interpersonal skills, behaviors and performance, portfolio and resume, development and job hunting skills will be presented.

HORT400V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Original investigations on assigned problems in horticulture. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

HORT401V Special Topics in Horticulture, Turf or Landscape (Irregular) (1-6) Topics related to horticulture, turfgrass or landscape science or management not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of a specific topic.

HORT402V Horticulture Judging and Competition Activity (Irregular) (1-6) Training for and participation on horticultural identification, judging and competitive teams. Prerequisite: HORT 2003. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

HORT4033 Professional Landscape Installation and Construction (Even years, Fa) Principles and practices involved in landscape installation and construction. Topics covered include sequencing construction activities, protecting existing trees, landscape soils, selecting plants, planting and transplanting plant materials, wood construction, cement and masonry construction, and low-voltage lighting. Lecture 3 hours per week. Preparatory training in agribusiness or business is suggested. Prerequisite: HORT 2003 and HORT 3103.

HORT4043 Professional Landscape Management (Odd years, Fa) Principles and practices of landscape management and maintenance. Topics include low maintenance and seasonal color design, pruning and hazard tree management, water and fertilizer management, pesticide use, and other maintenance activities. Basic elements of marketing, specifications and contracts, estimating, personnel management, and equipment selection and acquisition relevant for landscape services will be introduced. Preparatory training in agribusiness or business is suggested. Prerequisite: HORT 2003 and HORT 3103.

HORT4103 Fruit Production Science and Technology (Odd years, Sp) The management technologies and cultural practices of fruit crops including (but not limited to) blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, grapes, peaches, and apples will be presented. The underlying scientific principles of crop genetics, nutrition, and physiology will be presented as a basis for making management decisions in fruit crop productions. Corequisites: Lab component. Prerequisites: HORT 2003.

HORT4403 Plant Propagation (Even years, Sp) Principles of plant propagation using seeds, cuttings, grafting, budding, layering, and tissue culture. The physiological basis of propagation is described. Knowledge of plant growth and physiology is needed. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

HORT4603 Practical Landscape Planning (Even years, Sp) Ornamental planting design and landscape planning concepts. Preparing planting plans, materials sheets, and cost estimates for residential properties. Prerequisite: HORT 3103.

HORT462V Horticulture, Landscape, Turf Sciences Internship (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) A supervised practical work experience in a horticulture, landscape design, or turf business or research program to gain professional competence and insight into employment opportunities. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HORT4701L Greenhouse Management and Controlled Environment Horticulture Laboratory (Odd years, Fa) Laboratory involving hands-on experiments designed to demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture section. Includes field trips. Corequisite: HORT 4703.

HORT4703 Greenhouse Management and Controlled Environment Horticulture (Odd years, Fa) Operation and management of greenhouses and other controlled environments used in horticultural production. Emphasis on system design and construction, control of light intensity and photoperiod, heating and cooling systems, substrates, mineral nutrition, water quality and irrigation systems. Prerequisite: HORT 2003 and CHEM 1074.

HORT4801L Greenhouse Crops Production Laboratory (Even years, Sp) Laboratory involving hands-on experiments designed to demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture section. Includes field trips. Corequisite: HORT 4803.

HORT4803 Greenhouse Crops Production (Even years, Sp) Principles and practices of production and marketing of crops commonly grown in controlled environments including flowering containerized herbaceous species, geophytes, annual and perennial bedding plants, hydroponic vegetables and herbs. Prerequisite: HORT 4703.

HORT4903 Golf and Sports Turf Management (Odd years, Fa) Turf management techniques for golf courses, and athletic fields including species selection, root-zone construction and modification, fertilization, mowing, irrigation and pest control. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203 and CSES 2201L and (HORT 2303 or HORT 3403).

HORT4913 Rootzone Management for Golf and Sports Turf (Odd years, Sp) An overview of the fundamental concepts of the physical and chemical properties of rootzones as related to construction and turfgrass management. Prerequisite: HORT 2303.

HORT4921 Golf Course Operations (Even years, Fa) This course is designed to cover specific aspects of golf course operations that would not be included in traditional turfgrass management courses. Topics will include budgeting, personnel management, tournament setup and operation, dealing with golf club committees, communication, and other relevant topics related to managing a golf course maintenance operation. Prerequisites: HORT 4903.

HORT5001 Seminar (Sp, Fa) Review of scientific literature and oral reports on current research in horticulture. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

HORT503V Special Problems Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Original investigations on assigned problems in horticulture. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HORT5043 Advanced Plant Breeding (Odd years, Sp) Application of genetic principles to the improvement of crop plants. Presentation of conventional plant breeding methods and special techniques such as polyploidy, interspecific hybridization and induced mutation. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2321L (or ANSC 3123 and CSES 4103).

HORT600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HORT602V Special Topics in Horticulture (Irregular) (1-3) Discussion and advanced studies on selected topics in genetics, plant breeding, physiology and culture of horticultural crops. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HORT6033 Genetic Techniques in Plant Breeding (Even years, Fa) Indepth study of genetic improvement and techniques. Covers both current and classical literature. Topics to be discussed: haploidy, genetic control of pairing, somatic instability, tissue culture and protoplast fusion, and male sterility. Lecture discussion 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 2323 and BIOL 2321L (or ANSC 3123 and CSES 4103 or equivalent).

(HRDV) Human Resources Development

HRDV200V Work Experience (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-30) Credit by advanced standing examination for job knowledge as measured by advisor approved National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) assessments. May be repeated for up to 30 hours of degree credit.

HRDV3113 Skills/Strategies in Human Resource Development (Sp) Addresses the acquisition of professional skills and strategies associated with creating and maintaining adult learning environments. Involves a regular class workshop situation where skills are practiced and encouraged and a work-based situation where skills are tried and implemented as well as assessed. Pre- or Corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV3123 Theory and Principles of Needs Assessment and Evaluation in Human Resource Development (Sp, Fa) Addresses the acquisition of and application of knowledge associated with needs assessment and evaluation of human resources with emphasis on workplace situations. Pre- or Corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV3133 Theories and Principles of Communication in Human Resource Development (Sp) This course introduces communication principles and practices in HRD. Coursework emphasizes identifying and developing communication skills that apply to roles, responsibilities, and strategies while exploring how individuals communicate in organizational systems. Both theoretical and practical applications will be included. Pre- or Corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV3213 Introduction to Human Resource Development (Fa) Presents the theory and processes associated with human resource development (HRD) used to design and measure interventions in the areas of organization development, personnel training and development, and career development. Students will analyze organizations and study global implications of HRD. Also surveys topics in human resource management (HRM) that distinguish HRM from HRD. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HRDV3403 Employment Law in Human Resource Development (Sp, Su, Fa) This course covers the major employment law facts and concepts used in human resource development. Applications of the key concepts and facts are emphasized in the class. Knowledge of the employment law facts and concepts and their applications at the workplace is vital for the human resource development professional. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HRDV3503 Workforce Behavior (Su) The prerequisite for HRDV 450V Experiential Learning, this content examines the psychological impact of work on the individual through a study of organizational culture, job satisfaction, motivation, communication, behavioral styles, and career development. In addition, students will assess individual personality traits, learning styles, work skills, and develop both professional and personal life goals. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HRDV4113 Theory and Principles of Adult Education (Fa) Focus of study on the concept of individual differences, what they are, and how they affect the learning and teaching of adults. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HRDV4133 Theories and Principles of Group Dynamics in HRD (Sp, Fa) This course uncovers various theories and principles explaining group behaviors and processes underlying facilitation of group adult learning in the workplace. It is designed to equip learners with knowledge and skills applicable to developing team performance for a competitive organizational advantage. Pre- or corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV4213 Strategies in Professional Development in HRD (Sp, Fa) Students are encouraged to examine their own learning processes and professional development in terms of the theories and principles of how adults learn. Methods and strategies for self development and change are discussed. Self-directed lifelong learning strategies that ensure continued growth for professional adult educators/human resource development practitioners will be discussed. Pre- or Corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV4233 Theories and Principles of Leadership in Human Resource Development (Sp, Fa) This course provides an introduction to leadership principles and practices in the HRD area, and is intended as a foundation course for students practicing, or who plan to pursue a career in HRD. The emphasis is on identifying/developing HRD leadership skills and exploring various functions/attributes of leadership and their impact on HRD. Both theoretical and practical applications will be included. Pre- or Corequisites: HRDV 3213 and HRDV 4113.

HRDV450V Experiential Learning (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-30) This course is limited to persons qualifying for experiential credit to be applied to the Human Resource Development Concentration only. Credit is awarded for documented experiential or occupational learning based on a standardized format as suggested by the Council for the Advancement of Experiential Learning (CAEL). Credit for certain occupational training or professional certifications may also be earned using the American Council on Education (ACE) guidelines. Prerequisite: HRDV 3503. May be repeated for up to 30 hours of degree credit.

HRDV4603 Applied HRD in Practice I (Sp, Su) In an actual business/industrial setting, students will apply the theories and best practice presented and examined in the prerequisite course to identify needs in that organization. This course is designed as a journey beginning with the discovery and identification of organization needs and ending in a thoroughly researched and documented presentation of a human resource development intervention. Students will require access to organizational leaders, stakeholders, employees, and records; and will be expected to develop activities and a final product in alignment with the organization's strategic intent. Prerequisite: HRDV 3213.

HRDV4613 Applied Theory and Principles of Adult Education in HRD (Su) In an actual business/industrial setting, the student will observe, participate and apply skills regarding adult learning principles and theory. The focus is on identifying and evaluating leaders in the field of adult education; identifying characteristics of adult learners/teachers and evaluating current issues in the field of adult education. Prerequisite: HRDV 4113.

HRDV4623 Applied Theory and Principles of Communication in HRD Practice (Su, Fa) In an actual work setting, the student will apply the theories, principles, concepts and skills studied in the prerequisite course. Prerequisite: HRDV 3133.

HRDV4633 Applied Skills in HRD Practice (Sp, Su) In an actual business or industrial setting, the student will study, observe, participate and apply skills and strategies of "good training". The focus is on need for training, application of learning principles, writing instructional objectives and plans, designing active training methods, using visual aids, working with groups, and evaluating training. Prerequisite: HRDV 3113.

HRDV4643 Applied Theory & Principles of Needs Assessment and Evaluation in HRD Practice (Fa) This course address the application of knowledge and acquisition of experience associated with needs assessment and evaluation in human resource development with emphasis on workplace situations. Prerequisite: HRDV 3123.

HRDV4653 Applied Theories and Principles of Group Dynamics in HRD Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) In an actual business/industrial setting, the student will apply the theories, principles, concepts and skills studied in the prerequisite course and encourage learners to apply these principles within the work setting as a means of advancing their own careers while assisting their organizations to achieve organizational goals, objectives and resulting competitive advantage. Prerequisite: HRDV 4133.

HRDV4663 Applied Theories and Principles of HRD Leadership in HRD Practice (Sp, Su) This course is designed to guide students through an in depth process of identifying, analyzing, and synthesizing elements related to developing, articulating, and implementing an organizational vision, mission, and strategic plan. The course focuses students on exploring their own organization's strategic development plan. Prerequisite: HRDV 4233

HRDV4673 Applied Strategies of Professional Development in HRD Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to enhance the student's ability to identify personal tendencies affecting team performance, promote the application of adult learning principles by encouraging self-directed learning, and increase ethical awareness in the student's profession. Students will apply concepts from HRDV 4213 Strategies in Professional Development to complete a personal behavioral assessment, develop an individualized personal development plan, and reflect on the role of ethics in their profession. Prerequisite: HRDV 4213.

HRDV4683 Applied HRD in Practice II (Fa) The purpose of this practicum is to implement the Human Resource Development intervention designed in the HRDV 4603 Applied HRD in Practice I, where students applied the theories and best practices presented and examined in HRDV 3213 Introduction to HRD to identified needs in students' own organizations. Prerequisite: HRDV 3213. Pre- or Corequisite: HRDV 4603.

HRDV4693 Applied Strategies in HRD Practice (Su) In an actual business/industrial setting, the student will study, observe, participate and apply strategies of "good training". The focus is on the identification, evaluation, and synthesis of planning and conducting training in the workplace. Prerequisite: HRDV 3113.

(HUMN) Humanities

HUMN1114H Honors Roots of Culture to 500 C.E. (Fa) This course constitutes the first segment of a four-semester interdisciplinary study of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, the Torah, the Roman Colosseum, Hinduism, and Confucianism. Open to first-year Honors students by invitation only. Corequisite: Drill component.

HUMN1124H Honors Equilibrium of Cultures 500-1600 (Sp) This course constitutes the second segment of a four-semester sequence focusing on world cultures. Semester 2 may include the interdisciplinary study of Islam, early Byzantium, Gothic architecture, Heian Japan, and the ancient Maya. Open to first-year Honors students by invitation only. Corequisite: Drill component.

HUMN2003 Introduction to Gender Studies (Sp) This course explores cultural constructions of gender and sexuality using a variety of media, including literature, film, and architecture.

HUMN2003H Honors Introduction to Gender Studies (Fa) This course explores cultural constructions of gender and sexuality using a variety of media, including literature, film, and architecture.

HUMN2013 Introduction to Buddhism (Fa) Beginning with an analysis of the fundamental principles that underlie all Buddhist thought and practice, students will proceed through the major precepts that have historically distinguished the traditions of Southern and Northern Asia. Attention will also be given to Buddhism's spread through Europe and North America in the twentieth century.

HUMN2114H Honors Birth of Modern Culture 1600-1900 (Fa) This course constitutes the third segment of a four-semester sequence focusing on world cultures. Semester 3 may include the interdisciplinary study of Renaissance Venice, feudal Japan, Moghul India, Jefferson's Monticello, and Darwinism. Open to second-year Honors students by invitation only. Corequisite: Lab component.

HUMN2124H Honors Twentieth Century Global Culture (Sp) This course constitutes the fourth segment of a four-semester sequence focusing on world cultures. Semester 4 may include the interdisciplinary study of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Mexican Revolution, African literature, the Vietnam Memorial, and the atomic age. Open to second-year Honors students by invitation only. Corequisite: Lab component.

HUMN2213 Introduction to World Religions (Sp) A survey of the major religions, including--but not limited to--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity.

HUMN3003 Religions of Asia (Sp) This course explores the narrative, ritual, and communal practices of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Islam, and Sikhism.

HUMN3163 On Death and Dying (Sp, Su, Fa) Reviews the theory and humanistic importance of the concepts of death and dying in society. An experimental option and interdisciplinary faculty presenters will be part of the format. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Same as SCWK 3163)

HUMN3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Treats a special topic or issue offered as a part of the Honors Program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy.

HUMN425V Colloquium (Irregular) (1-6) An interdisciplinary, value-oriented discussion course. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HUMN425VH Honors Colloquium (Irregular) (1-6) An interdisciplinary, value-oriented discussion course. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(INEG) Industrial Engineering

INEG2101 Principles of Industrial Engineering (Fa) Considers the past and present roles of the professional industrial engineer and evaluates future trends. Introduces courses to follow and shows their relationship to the systems analysis problems encountered. Corequisite: Lab component.

INEG2403 Industrial Cost Analysis (Sp) Use of accounting information for planning and control with emphasis on the engineering viewpoint; introduction to general accounting procedures; principles of cost accounting and other aspects of production costs; budgeting, depreciation, taxes, distribution of profits, securities, sources of corporate capital, interpretation of financial statements, and other related topics. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component.

INEG3313 Engineering Statistics (Sp, Fa) Fundamentals of probability and distribution theory with applications to various branches of engineering; experimental procedures and sample size; statistical decision theory including significance testing and estimation. Drill required. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564.

INEG3313H Engineering Statistics (Sp, Fa) Fundamentals of probability and distribution theory with applications to various branches of engineering; experimental procedures and sample size; statistical decision theory including significance testing and estimation. Drill required. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564.

INEG3333 Industrial Statistics (Sp, Fa) Application of statistical techniques to industrial problems; relationships between experimental measurements using regression and correlation theory and analysis of variance models; emphasis on inherent variability of production processes; control chart techniques and the use of exponential and Weibull models in reliability analysis; acceptance sampling procedures. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG3413 Engineering Economic Analysis (Sp, Fa) Economic aspects of engineering, including current economic problems and the treatment of estimates when evaluating alternative courses of action. Methods of selection and replacement of equipment and break-even points of operation; desirability of new processes or projects where asset life, rate of return on investment, and first, fixed, differential, marginal, and sunk costs must be considered. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2554.

INEG3513 Manufacturing Design and Processes (Fa) Fundamental topics of manufacturing design and processes; the effects of manufacturing processes on product design and cost; engineering design and CAD as well as product inspection; and quality control. Engineering materials, comprehensive manufacturing processes including metal machining, casting, and forming. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054.

INEG3523 Manufacturing Systems (Sp) Fundamental topics of manufacturing systems, classifications and analysis of automated manufacturing systems. Introduction to automation, hardware components of manufacturing systems, industrial control systems as well as applications on NC part programming, industrial robots, and PLC programming. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: INEG 3513.

INEG3613 Introduction to Operations Research (Sp) Simplex method of linear programming, dual problem and sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignment problems, game theory and linear programming; introduction to dynamic programming; deterministic and probabilistic inventory models; project control with PERT/CPM. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG3713 Methods and Standards (Sp, Fa) Fundamental rules of motion economy; motion analysis by means of charts; diagrams; work place design; tool and equipment selection; operator selection; and job description and analysis. Fundamentals of time study; observed and synthetic times; use of standard data and time formula; leveling; rating; allowances; and computer program development of latest electronic time study equipment. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG3813H Honors Product Integrity (Irregular) This course explores the concepts of product integrity including reliability, maintainability and warranty. Particular emphasis is placed on probability modeling of product performance and statistical analysis of product reliability data. Case studies are used to reinforce concepts in an engineering setting. Prerequisite: INEG 3313 or STAT 3013, Honors College students only.

INEG3833 Data Processing Systems Engineering (Irregular) Design and analysis of database management systems. Information systems applications development in inventory systems, shop floor control, production scheduling, and various corporate databases. A relational database management system such as Oracle or Access is used. Prerequisite: Computer Elective II.

INEG400VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) For Honors College students majoring in Industrial Engineering only. Prerequisite: Honors college students only.

INEG410V Special Topics in Industrial Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current industrial engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

INEG410VH Honors Special Topics in Industrial Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current industrial engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: senior standing. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

INEG411V Individual Study in Industrial Engineering (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member.

INEG411VH Honors Individual Study in Industrial Engineering (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Individual study and research on a topic mutually agreeable to the student and a faculty member.

INEG4223 Occupational Safety and Health Standards (Irregular) Survey of existing and proposed standards by examining fundamental physical, economic, and legal bases. Performance vs. specific standards. Enforceability and data collection. National consensus and promulgation process. Includes a computer-based design project. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054 or graduate standing.

INEG4223H Honors Occupational Safety and Health Standards (Irregular) Survey of existing and proposed standards by examining fundamental physical, economic, and legal bases. Performance vs. specific standards. Enforceability and data collection. National consensus and promulgation process. Includes a computer-based design project. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054 or graduate standing.

INEG4243 Automated Manufacturing (Irregular) Introduction to manufacturing processes and concurrent engineering in the electronics industry. Survey of electronics components and products and the processes of fabrication and assembly. Principles of design, productivity, quality, and economics. Emphasis on manufacturability. Prerequisite: INEG 3513.

INEG4323 Quality Engineering and Management (Irregular) Provides the student with complete coverage of the functional area of "Quality Assurance" ranging from the need for such a function, how it works, techniques utilized, and managerial approaches for insuring its effectiveness. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4343 Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction (Fa) Fundamental theory and practice of the design, implementation, and evaluation of human-computer interfaces, with emphases on the importance of good interfaces and the relationship of interface design to effective user interaction with computers.

INEG4383 Risk Analysis for Transportation and Logistics Systems (Irregular) Fundamentals of modeling risk, analyzing risk, and managing risk in a variety of industrial and government decision-making settings. Risk measurement and model building, uncertainty quantification, and multi-objective trade-offs. Prerequisites: INEG 3313 and INEG 4553.

INEG4423 Advanced Engineering Economy (Irregular) Preparation of feasibility studies, including cost estimation, risk and uncertainty, sensitivity analysis and decision making. Effects of taxes, depreciation and financing costs on cash flows. Prerequisite: INEG 3413.

INEG4423H Honors Advanced Engineering Economy (Irregular) Preparation of feasibility studies, including cost estimation, risk and uncertainty, sensitivity analysis and decision making. Effects of taxes, depreciation and financing costs on cash flows. Prerequisite: INEG 3413.

INEG4433 Systems Engineering and Management (Fa) Studies of cases in engineering administration emphasizing human relationships in a technical environment. Productivity/quality enhancement through an understanding of organizational design and behavior, motivation and reward systems, and participative management Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4433H Honors Systems Engineering and Management (Fa) Studies of cases in engineering administration emphasizing human relationships in a technical environment. Productivity/quality enhancement through an understanding of organizational design and behavior, motivation and reward systems, and participative management Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4443 Project Management (Irregular) Analysis of the strategic level of engineering management including environment, planning, organization, and staffing. Professional creativity, motivation, leadership, and ethics are explored. At the tactical level, project selection, control and systems management are analyzed. Organizational behavior and models related to scientific and professional employees are examined. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4443H Honors Project Management (Irregular) Analysis of the strategic level of engineering management including environment, planning, organization, and staffing. Professional creativity, motivation, leadership, and ethics are explored. At the tactical level, project selection, control and systems management are analyzed. Organizational behavior and models related to scientific and professional employees are examined. Prerequisite: senior standing.

INEG4533 Application of Machine Vision (Sp) Automated machine vision applied to assembly and inspection tasks traditionally performed by human operators; development of application by acquiring image, processing image data, analyzing image and transmitting results; application analysis, selection and economics. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4543 Materials Handling (Fa) Equipment, systems, problems, and analysis of industrial material handling, with emphasis upon manufacturing. Vehicles, containers and racks, conveyors, overhead systems, and miscellaneous equipment. Criteria for selection and decision models. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: INEG 3413, INEG 3713 and INEG 3523.

INEG4553 Production Planning and Control (Sp) Operational problems of production systems including a control of purchased materials inventory; scheduling a job shop, batch, and continuous production processes for single and multi-item product lines; planning of work force and inventory under seasonal and stochastic demand. Prerequisite or Corequisite: INEG 3613.

INEG4563 Application of Robotics (Fa) Industrial robotics, programming and applications; tooling and interfacing with peripheral equipment; sensor technology; machine vision; application analysis; selection and justification; research; economics; and human interface. Laboratory required. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

INEG4623 Introduction to Simulation (Fa) Elementary queuing models derivations and applications. Discrete simulation techniques. The SIMNET simulation language. Applications of simulation to the design of industrial and service installations. Simulation project. Prerequisite: CSCE 2013. Pre or Corequisite: INEG 3333.

INEG4623H Honors Introduction to Simulation (Fa) Elementary queuing models derivations and applications. Discrete simulation techniques. The SIMNET simulation language. Applications of simulation to the design of industrial and service installations. Simulation project. Prerequisite: CSCE 2013. Pre or Corequisite: INEG 3333.

INEG4633 Transportation Logistics (Irregular) Topics in transportations logistics of interest to engineers: routing and location analysis, fleet sizing, logistics facilities design, applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies to transportation systems modeling and analysis. Prerequisite: INEG 3613.

INEG4723 Ergonomics (Sp, Fa) The capabilities and limitations of humans are addressed in the context of the person's interaction with machines and the environment. Topics of discussion include anthropometric considerations in equipment design, human sensory and physiological capabilities in the work environment, selection and training of workers, and the design of controls and displays. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: INEG 3713 and INEG 4333.

INEG4733 Industrial Ergonomics (Irregular) Gives background and experience in measurement and evaluation of human performance as it pertains to the working environment. The physical, physiological and psychological capabilities of the tasks they are to perform. Laboratory projects required. Prerequisite: INEG 4723 and INEG 3333.

INEG4904 Industrial Engineering Design (Sp, Fa) Comprehensive design problem for an industrial enterprise; integration of preceding courses through development of physical systems and organizational characteristics, financial aspects, product analysis, equipment selection, production layout, distribution systems, and overall economic analysis. Students must be in last long semester of degree program. Prerequisite: INEG 4543 and INEG 4623.

INEG5123 Industrial Engineering in the Service Sector (Irregular) Review of the development of industrial engineering into the service sector, e.g., health care systems, banking, municipal services, utilities, and postal service. Emphasizes those principles and methodologies applicable to the solutions of problems within the service industries. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

INEG513V Master's Research Project and Report (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Required course for students electing the report option.

INEG514V Special Topics in Industrial Engineering (Irregular) (1-3) Consideration of current industrial engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

INEG515V Individual Study in Industrial Engineering (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Opportunity for individual study of advanced subjects related to a graduate industrial engineering program to suit individual requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

INEG5223 Safety and Health Standards Research (Irregular) For graduate students who seek Certified Professional or Certified Industrial Hygienist status, or both. Includes review and development of computer databases for standards, interpretations, court decisions, and field memoranda. Test equipment and procedures for determining indoor industrial aid containment PEL concentrations and industrial environment noise levels are examined. Prerequisite: INEG 4223 or OMGT 4303. (Same as OMGT 5223)

INEG5243 Automated Manufacturing (Irregular) Introduction to manufacturing processes and concurrent engineering in the electronics industry. Survey of electronics components and products and the processes of fabrication and assembly. Principles of design, productivity, quality, and economics. Emphasis on manufacturability.

INEG5313 Engineering Applications of Probability Theory and Stochastic Processes (Sp) Basic probability theory; random variables and stochastic processes; distribution of sums, products, and quotients of random variables, with application to engineering; normal and Poisson processes; engineering applications of Markov chains, ergodic theorem, and applications. Prerequisite: INEG 3313 and MATH 2574.

INEG5323 Reliability (Irregular) Reliability and maintenance techniques including probability modeling, statistical analysis, testing and improvement. Emphasis on engineering applications and computer analysis methods. Prerequisite: INEG 3313 or equivalent.

INEG5333 Design of Industrial Experiments (Irregular) Statistical analysis as applied to problems and experiments in engineering and industrial research; experiment design and analysis; probability; and response surface analysis. Prerequisite: INEG 3333 or equivalent.

INEG5343 Advanced Quality Control Methods (Irregular) Acceptance sampling by attributes; single, double, sequential, and multiple sampling plans; sampling plans; sampling plans of Department of Defense; acceptance sampling by variables; Bayesian acceptance sampling; rectifying inspection for lot-by-lot sampling; control charts; special devices; and procedures. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG5363 Generalized Linear Models (Irregular) Introduce the generalized linear model (GLM), inference, likelihood and diagnostics. Apply log linear and logistic models. Develop techniques for growth curves, and longitudinal and survival data. Cover spatial and normal linear models, and dynamic GLM for dependent data.

INEG5373 Repairable Systems Modeling (Irregular) Applications of probability, statistics, simulation and optimization to problems related to 1) modeling the performance of repairable equipment; 2) designing optimal inspection and maintenance policies for repairable equipment; and 3) optimizing the allocation of maintenance resources.

INEG5383 Risk Analysis for Transportation and Logistics Systems (Irregular) Fundamentals of modeling risk, analyzing risk, and managing risk in a variety of industrial and government decision-making settings. Risk measurement and model building, uncertainty quantification, and multi-objective trade-offs. Credit cannot be earned for both INEG 4383 and INEG 5383.

INEG5393 Applied Regression Analysis for Engineers (Irregular) Present concepts and applications to introduce statistical tools for discovering relationships among variables. Focus on fitting and checking linear and nonlinear regression models. Practical tools for engineers.

INEG5423 Engineering in Global Competition (Irregular) Studies of principles and cases in engineering administration in global competition. Emphasis on high-technology manufacturing such as the electronics industry. Survey of markets, technologies, multinational corporations, cultures, and customs. Discussions of ethics, professionalism, difference valuing, human relations skills, and other topics relevant to global engineering practice.

INEG5433 Cost Estimation Models (Irregular) Overview of cost estimation techniques and methodologies applied to manufacturing and service organizations. Accomplished through detailed analysis of the cost estimation development process and various cost estimation models. Topics include data collection and management, learning curves, activity based costing, detailed and parametric estimation models, and handing risk and uncertainty. Prerequisite: INEG 3333. (Same as OMGT 5433)

INEG5443 Decision Models (Irregular) Focus on quantitative and qualitative decision models and techniques for technical and managerial problems. Emphasis on application and interpretation of results. Topics include decision trees, influence diagrams, weighting methods, value of information, Analytic Hierarchy Process, Bayes Theorem, Monte Carlo simulation, utility theory, risk analysis, group decision making and expert systems. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG5523 Topics in Automated Systems (Irregular) To understand current developments in applications of flexible automation to industrial processes. Robotics, machine vision and other sensors, human machine interface, AML/2 and V+ programming languages.

INEG5533 Transportation Logistics (Irregular) Topics in transportations logistics of interest to engineers: routing and location analysis, fleet sizing, logistics facilities design, applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies to transportation systems modeling and analysis. Prerequisite: INEG 5613.

INEG5543 Distribution Center Design & Operations (Irregular) To introduce the student to the field of facility logistics, as applied to distribution centers (DCs). The fundamental areas of facility design and operations (material handling systems) will be covered. Prerequisite: INEG 5613

INEG5613 Optimization Theory I (Fa) Basic solutions and bases in linear equations, matrix version of simplex tableau, duality and primal dual relationships, complementary slackness, revised simplex, interior point algorithms and improving search strategies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

INEG5623 Analysis of Inventory Systems (Irregular) Elements of production and inventory control, economic lot size models, price breaks models using Lagrangian method, deterministic dynamic inventory model, probabilistic one-period and multi-period models, zero and positive lead time models, and continuous review models. Prerequisite: INEG 5313.

INEG5643 Optimization Theory II (Irregular) Classical optimization theory, Lagrangian and Jacobian methods, Kuhn-Tucker theory and constraint qualification, duality in nonlinear problems; separable programming, quadratic programming, geometric programming, stochastic programming, steepest ascent method, convex combinations method, SUMT, Fibonacci search, and golden section method. Prerequisite: INEG 5613.

INEG5653 Modeling and Analysis of Semiconductor Manufacturing (Irregular) Introduction to front end of semiconductor manufacturing process, wafer processing. Topics include an introduction to wafer processing, factory and equipment capacity modeling, automated material handling, simulation, cost modeling, and production scheduling. Prerequisite: INEG 3313.

INEG5683 Nonlinear Programming (Irregular) An introduction to the theory and methodology of nonlinear programming. Focus on engineering and management science applications of nonlinear optimization. Both single and multi-variable as well as unconstrained and constrained problems are addressed.

INEG5693 Heuristic Optimization (Irregular) Theory and applications of methodological approaches explicitly addressed to heuristic or approximate optimization of integer and combinatorial models. Prerequisite: INEG 5613.

INEG5713 Advanced Topics in Human Factors Engineering (Irregular) Advanced work in special research topics in man-machine systems. Prerequisite: INEG 4723.

INEG5823 Systems Simulation I (Irregular) Monte Carlo technique, construction of digital simulation models, timekeeping in simulations, design of simulation experiment, and statistical verification of results. Includes the use of simulation language such as ARENA. Prerequisite: CSCE 2013 and INEG 3313 (or equivalent).

INEG5843 Scheduling and Sequencing I (Irregular) An introduction to constructive algorithms and various operations research approaches for solving sequencing and scheduling problems. The NP-completeness of most scheduling problems leads to a discussion of computational complexity, the use of heuristic solution methods, and the development of worst case bounds. Prerequisite: INEG 3613 and computer programming proficiency.

INEG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-9)

INEG6613 Operations Research Applications (Irregular) Investigation of literature case studies; use of mathematical models to solve practical problems; data collection and solution implementation. Students work in teams on actual problems observed in industry and government. Prerequisite: INEG 4623, INEG 5313 and INEG 5613.

INEG6823 Systems Simulation II (Irregular) Advanced topics in computer simulation including experimental design, simulation optimization, variance reduction, and statistical output analysis techniques applied to discrete event simulation. Prerequisite: INEG 4623.

INEG6843 Scheduling and Sequencing II (Irregular) An investigation into constructive algorithms and various operations research approaches for solving sequencing and scheduling problems in a variety of machine environments (single-machine, parallel machines, flow shops, and job shops). Prerequisite: INEG 5843.

INEG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)

(ISYS) Information Systems

ISYS2263 Introduction to Information Systems (Sp, Fa) This course presents the fundamental concepts used in developing information systems. It provides a framework for students to use throughout their software development coursework. Also includes management of information systems concepts. This course requires extensive use of computer systems. Prerequisite: WCOB 1023 and MATH 2053 each with a grade of C or better.

ISYS3293 Systems Analysis and Design (Sp, Fa) Practice and application of one structured analysis methodology; development of structured analysis specification; exposure to other methodologies; quality assurance and walkthroughs; survey of real systems and their components. Prerequisite: ISYS 2263 or CSCE 2014 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS3393 Business Application Development Fundamentals (Sp) Principles of design and development of windows and web applications using cutting edge visual development tools included in Visual Studio. The programming language will be Visual Basic and its use in Windows applications and in conjunction with active server pages and XML for web applications. Prerequisite: ISYS 2263 or CSCE 2014 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4003H Honors Information Systems Colloquium (Fa) Explores events, concepts and/or new developments in the field of Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ISYS4133 E Business Development (Irregular) This course explores various e-business development technologies and then utilizes the technologies for developing a relatively realistic business-to-consumer (B2C) e-business site. Students will also learn about Business to Business (B2B) strategies, market exchanges, XML and XML Web services applications. Simple XML Web services will also be created. Prerequisite: ISYS 3393 or ISYS 4373 or CSCE 1123 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4233 Seminar in ERP Development (Sp) ERP administration and system development practices. Advanced system support issues related to Enterprise Resource Planning systems that are used in global organizations. Basic ABAP programming. In addition, students will learn how to provide basic systems administration support of the operating system, database, and application systems software levels or ERP systems. Pre- or Corequisite: WCOB 4223 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4243 Current Topics in Computer Information (Irregular) Intensive investigation of selected developments in computer information systems hardware, software, and organization having current impact on computer information systems design and application. Offering an extension of lower-level CIS courses through individual student research and faculty team-teaching of advanced topics. Topical selection made with each course offering. Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ISYS4263 Information Technology Strategy (Irregular) This course explores the strategic management and control issues associated with IT. This course provides a framework to understand how IT strategy aligns with business strategy and how to develop an enterprise level information technology strategy. Prerequisite: WCOB 3016 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4283 Business Database Systems (Fa) Introduces student to centralized information system design and implementation for business applications. Indepth study of logical systems modeling; physical file management; and software requirements. Pre- or Corequisite: ISYS 3393 with a grade of "C" or better. Prerequisite: ISYS 3293 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4293 Business Intelligence (Sp) Business intelligence focuses on creating, developing and storing information and knowledge from internal and external sources to better support business decisions. We will consider techniques from machine learning, data mining, and information retrieval to extract useful knowledge from data, which could be used for business intelligence, personalization or user profiling. Prerequisite: WCOB 1033 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4333 Object-Oriented Technologies Seminar (Irregular) Provides the student with theory and application of information systems development utilizing object-oriented (OO) technology. Topics include object-oriented analysis, design, data modeling, database management systems, and programming. Prerequisite: ISYS 3293 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4363 Business Project Development (Sp) Review of fundamentals of application processing systems design and development; implementation of such a system by class. Pre-or Corequisite: ISYS 4283 with a grade of "C" or better. Prerequisite: ISYS 3393 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4373 Application Development with Java (Fa) This course covers object-oriented programming concepts and illustrates them via an appropriate object-oriented programming language. Students will be exposed to the design of software objects, creation of software objects, and the use of objects in constructing an information system. Prerequisite: ISYS 3293.

ISYS4453 Introduction to Enterprise Servers (Fa) The focus of this course is to expose students to working with large scale mainframe computer systems. Mainframe computers are the heart of large company's transaction processing systems. This course provides the opportunity for students to gain valuable insight into computing in a mainframe operating environment. Prerequisite: ISYS 2263 or CSCE 2014 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS4463 Enterprise Transaction Systems (Sp) Being able to accurately capture and store business transactions is an important processing function in many businesses. For many large companies with high volume processing, the tools of choice for transaction processing are CICS/Cobol/DB2. This course provides students with the necessary understanding and skills to work in this type environment. Prerequisite: ISYS 2263 or CSCE 2014 or ISYS 4453 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS450V Independent Study (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Permits students on individual basis to explore selected topics in data processing and/or Quantitative Analysis.

ISYS4933 Global Information Technology Management (Irregular) This course will focus on IT environments around the world, national infrastructures and regulatory regimes, global IT applications, global IS development strategies, global management support systems, and global IT management strategies. The course will inculcate an in-depth understanding of managing information resources across national borders, time zones, cultures, political philosophies, regulatory regimes, and economic infrastructures. Prerequisite: WCOB 3016 with a grade of "C" or better.

ISYS511V IT Toolkit & Skills Seminar (Irregular) (0-3) Seminar in Information Systems solutions concepts (such as applications development, VB.NET, analysis of problems and design of solutions via application systems, etc.) designed for students entering the MIS program. Prerequisite: MIS Director approval. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ISYS5133 E Business Development (Sp) This course explores various e-business development technologies and then utilizes the technologies for developing a relatively realistic business-to-consumer (B2C) e-business site. Students will also learn about Business to Business (B2B) strategies, market exchanges, XML and XML Web services applications. Simple XML Web services will also be created. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent).

ISYS5203 Statistics and Quantitative Analysis (Fa) (First offered Summer 2002, Formerly CISQ 5203) Statistical analysis at intermediate level; lectures and problems develop understanding of statistical methods and provide illustrative situations for applying those methods. Includes analysis of variance and multiple regression. Prerequisite: ISYS 3033.

ISYS5233 Seminar in ERP Development (Sp, Fa) ERP administration and system development practices. Advanced system support issues related to Enterprise Resource Planning systems that are used in global organizations. Basic ABAP programming. In addition, students will learn how to provide basic systems administration support of the operating system, database, and application systems software levels of ERP systems. Pre- or Corequisite: WCOB 5223. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent) and WCOB 5213. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ISYS535V Information Technology Internship Experience (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) This course allows a student to experience an internship within a business and benefit from the applied IT experience. The internship must focus on IT applications/problems and be supervised by a faculty member as well as a member of the firm. Pre- or corequisite: MIS Director approval is required. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ISYS5363 Business Analytics (Sp) This course in managerial business analytics provides future managers with the key concepts of decision modeling and information technology management concepts. Students will learn to utilize real time operational business data, as well as quickly process and effectively leverage information. In addition, students will exercise strategic IT deployment skills for supply chain and marketing processes as well as develop strong decision modeling abilities.

ISYS5423 Seminar in Systems Development (Fa) Advanced study of structured systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical systems specifications and for deriving physical systems designs. Coverage of methodologies for dealing with complexity in the development of information systems. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent) and ISYS 3293 (or equivalent).

ISYS5433 Enterprise Systems (Fa) Enterprise Systems comprises the entire class of information technology and systems that support the mission of the company including decision support and business processes. This managerial enterprise systems course focuses on strategic issues of information technology. Students study the various elements and integration of an organization's business processes; as a result, students gain an understanding and working knowledge of systems used to support these business processes and their use in decision making. In addition, students will study concepts and develop skills needed to utilize decision-centric business intelligence and knowledge management applications.

ISYS5453 Introduction to Enterprise Servers (Fa) The focus of this course is to expose students to working with large scale mainframe computer systems. Mainframe computers are the heart of large company's transaction processing systems. This course provides the opportunity for students to gain valuable insight into computing in a mainframe operating environment. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 or equivalent.

ISYS5463 Enterprise Transaction Systems (Sp) Being able to accurately capture and store business transactions is an important processing function in many businesses. For many large companies with high volume processing, the tools of choice for transaction processing are CICS/Cobol/DB2. This course provides students with the necessary understanding and skills to work in this type environment. Pre- or Corequisite: ISYS 5453 (or equivalent) or MIS Director approval. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent).

ISYS5503 Decision Support Systems (Sp) An analysis of the highest level of information support which serves the manager-user. A study of systems providing quantitative-based information derived from one or more databases within and/or external to the organization and used to aid upper-level management in the decision making process. The evaluation and application of tools in problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent).

ISYS5613 Business Applications of Nonparametric Techniques (Sp) (First offered Summer 2002, Formerly CISQ 5613) Consideration of business and economic research related to sampling and experimental design, testing of hypothesis, and using nonparametric tests. Prerequisite: ISYS 5203 or equivalent.

ISYS5623 Statistical Analysis (Sp) Applications of statistical techniques and analysis of business and economic research. For students in business and economics without regard to fields of specialization. Prerequisite: ISYS 5203.

ISYS5713 Seminar in Telecommunications (Irregular) General telecommunications characteristics and capabilities relative to business applications, networking, electronic commerce, consideration of IT management, security, and ethics. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110.

ISYS5723 Computer Methods in Research (Su) Applications of computers to business and industrial research. Numerical problem-solving techniques, statistical computational techniques and packages, and accessing of government and private standard data bases. Prerequisite: ISYS 5623.

ISYS5833 Data Management Systems (Fa) Investigation and application of advanced database concepts include database administration, database technology, and selection and acquisition of database management systems. Data modeling and system development in a database environment. Pre- or Corequisite: ISYS 5423. Prerequisite: ISYS 5110 (or equivalent).

ISYS5843 Seminar in Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (Fa) Business intelligence focuses on assessing and creating information and knowledge from internal and external sources to support business decision making process. In this seminar, data mining and information retrieval techniques will be used to extract useful knowledge from data, which could be used for business intelligence, and knowledge management. Prerequisite: ISYS 5503 or equivalent and ISYS 5833 or equivalent.

ISYS5933 Global Information Systems Seminar (Su) This course is designed to provide an updated, comprehensive and rigorous treatment of the emerging global IT fields. It summarizes current experiences, offers managerial insights, and incorporates foundational perspectives and examines significant issues from global perspectives. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and MIS Director approval.

ISYS5943 Management of Information Technology Seminar (Sp) Presented in a way that allows you to play an active role in the design, use, and management of information technology. Using IT to transform the organization, as competitive strategy, and creating new relationship with other firms is included. Prerequisite: ISYS 5423 and ISYS 5833.

ISYS6011 Graduate Colloquium (Sp, Fa) Presentation and critique of research papers and proposals.

ISYS6333 Research Seminar (Sp, Fa) Topical research seminar; emphases on understanding and conducting information systems research. Topics will vary. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

ISYS636V Special Problems (Irregular) (1-6) Independent reading and research under supervision of senior staff member. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ISYS6423 Seminar in Causal Modeling (Sp) Exposure to use of causal modeling in current research. Particular emphasis given to confirmatory analysis, covariance structure modeling, and their applications in construct measurement and hypothesis testing.

ISYS700V Doctoral Dissertations (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(ITAL) Italian

ITAL1003 Elementary Italian I (Fa)

ITAL1013 Elementary Italian II (Sp) Elementary courses stress correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability, and lead to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

ITAL2003 Intermediate Italian I (Fa) Intermediate courses lead to greater facility in spoken language and to more advanced reading skills.

ITAL2013 Intermediate Italian II (Sp) Continued development of basic speaking comprehension, and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills.

ITAL3003 Italian Conversation (Fa) Three hours per week of guided conversation practice for the post-intermediate student. Prerequisite: ITAL 2013.

ITAL3013 Introduction to Literature (Sp) Development of reading skills and introduction to literary analysis. Prerequisite: ITAL 2013 or equivalent. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

ITAL4003 Advanced Italian Conversation (Fa) Conversation practice for advanced undergraduates. Intended to refine language comprehension while providing in-depth understanding of Italian life and culture. Prerequisite: ITAL 3003 and ITAL 3013.

ITAL475V Special Investigations (Irregular) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(JAPN) Japanese

JAPN1003 Elementary Japanese I (Fa)

JAPN1013 Elementary Japanese II (Sp) Elementary courses stress correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability, and lead to active mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability.

JAPN2003 Intermediate Japanese I (Fa) Intermediate courses lead to greater facility in spoken language and to more advanced reading skills.

JAPN2013 Intermediate Japanese II (Sp) Continued development of basic reading comprehension and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills. Prerequisite: JAPN 2003 or equivalent.

JAPN2013H Honors Intermediate Japanese II (Sp) Continued development of basic reading comprehension and writing skills and intensive development of reading skills. Prerequisite: JAPN 2003 or equivalent.

JAPN2022 Intermediate Conversation I (Sp, Fa) Supplemental to 2003. Provides 2 hours of guided conversation per week with the objective of building the listening/speaking skills.

JAPN3003 Advanced Japanese I (Fa) Introduces more complex forms and structures of the language as well as more Kanji (Chinese Characters) aiming at the improvement of all the skills: speaking, listening, writing and reading. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013.

JAPN3003H Honors Advanced Japanese I (Fa) Introduces more complex forms and structures of the language as well as more Kanji (Chinese Characters) aiming at the improvement of all the skills: speaking, listening, writing and reading. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013.

JAPN3013 Advanced Japanese II (Sp) Continuation of JAPN 3003 with more complex forms and structures of the language as well as more Kanji (Chinese Characters) aiming at the improvement of all the skills: speaking, listening, writing and reading. Prerequisite: JAPN 3003.

JAPN3013H Honors Advanced Japanese II (Sp) Continuation of JAPN 3003 with more complex forms and structures of the language as well as more Kanji (Chinese Characters) aiming at the improvement of all the skills: speaking, listening, writing and reading. Prerequisite: JAPN 3003.

JAPN3033 Advanced Japanese Conversation (Fa) Conversational practice for advanced learners of Japanese. Designed primarily for students who intend to use Japanese in business and other formal settings. Honorific and humble expressions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013.

JAPN3033H Honors Advanced Japanese Conversation (Fa) Conversational practice for advanced learners of Japanese. Designed primarily for students who intend to use Japanese in business and other formal settings. Honorific and humble expressions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013.

JAPN3983 Special Studies (Irregular) May be offered in a subject not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JAPN3983H Honors Special Studies (Irregular) May be offered in a subject not specifically covered by courses otherwise listed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JAPN4213 Japanese Culture (Irregular) Insight into Japanese civilization and culture with special emphasis on the areas such as social life and environment, education, religion and customs, and visual and performing arts. This course also discusses western influence on Japanese society, culture and language and how traditional and modern values are manifested in Japanese society. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JAPN4313 Language and Society of Japan (Fa) The primary objective of this course is to investigate the way the Japanese language reflects the beliefs and custom of the Japanese people as a social group. For comparison purposes, this course makes reference to studies in American language and culture. Proficiency in Japanese not required. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JAPN4313H Honors Language and Society of Japan (Fa) The primary objective of this course is to investigate the way the Japanese language reflects the beliefs and custom of the Japanese people as a social group. For comparison purposes, this course makes reference to studies in American language and culture. Proficiency in Japanese not required. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JAPN4333 Business Writing in Japanese (Sp) This course aims to familiarize the students with formats, vocabulary, and situationally specific expressions in Japanese business correspondence. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013 or equivalent Japanese proficiency.

JAPN4333H Honors Business Writing in Japanese (Sp) This course aims to familiarize the students with formats, vocabulary, and situationally specific expressions in Japanese business correspondence. Prerequisite: JAPN 2013 or equivalent Japanese proficiency.

(JOUR) Journalism

JOUR1023 Media and Society (Sp, Fa) A survey of mass media (newspaper, radio, TV, magazine, advertising, public relations, photography, etc.) which stresses their importance in today's society and introduces the student to the various areas in journalism. Recommended for students considering journalism as a major. Prerequisite: Journalism major or department consent.

JOUR1033 Fundamentals of Journalism (Sp, Su, Fa) Introduces students to the skills of observation, critical thinking and concise writing required in all aspects of journalism, as well as to the technology needed in upper- upper-level courses. Practice using references for grammar and journalistic style. A prerequisite to JOUR 2013, 2033, 2063 and 4143. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Journalism major or deparment consent.

JOUR1033H Honors Fundamentals of Journalism (Sp, Fa) Introduces students to the skills of observation, critical thinking and concise writing required in all aspects of journalism, as well as to the technology needed in upper-upper-level courses. Practice using references for grammer and journalistic style. A prerequisite to JOUR 2013, 2033, 2063 and 4143. Corequisite: Lab component.

JOUR2013 News Reporting I (Sp, Fa) Intensive training in the methods of gathering and writing news. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: JOUR 1023 and JOUR 1033, each with a grade of C or better.

JOUR2013H Honors News Reporting I (Sp, Fa) Intensive training in the methods of gathering and writing news. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: JOUR 1023 and JOUR 1033.

JOUR2031L Broadcast News Reporting I Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Provides experience in basic broadcast news reporting techniques. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: JOUR 2032. Prerequisite: JOUR 1033 with a grade of C or better.

JOUR2032 Broadcast News Reporting I (Sp, Fa) Intensive training in the methods of gathering and writing broadcast news. Lecture 2 hours per week. Corequisite: JOUR 2031L. Prerequisite: JOUR 1033 with a grade of C or better.

JOUR2063 Media Technology (Su, Fa) Introduction to computer skills required in journalism; focus is training in the major computer software used in the profession. Prerequisite: JOUR 1023 and JOUR 1033.

JOUR2331L Photojournalism I Laboratory (Fa) Photojournalism 1 Lab involves the transfer of images from a digital camera to a computer, and involves the use of image editing and enhancing software as well as layout and design software. Corequisite: JOUR 2332.

JOUR2332 Photo Journalism I (Fa) Beginning course in the fundamentals of photography, including digital photography, composition, file transfer and management, image enhancement, and layout and design. Corequisite: JOUR 2331L.

JOUR3013 Editing (Sp, Fa) Theories and practices in newspaper editing, copyreading, headline writing, page layout and the gathering and publication of written and pictorial information. Prerequisite: JOUR 1023 and JOUR 2013.

JOUR3023 News Reporting II (Sp, Su, Fa) Continuation of JOUR 2013. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: JOUR 2013.

JOUR3071L Broadcast News Reporting II Laboratory (Sp, Fa) Television studio production including producing, directing, teleprompter, character generation, audio, lighting, and camera operation. Produce weekly TV news program for broadcast. Corequisite: JOUR 3072. Prerequisite: JOUR 2032 and JOUR 2031L.

JOUR3072 Broadcast News Reporting II (Sp, Fa) Advanced techniques in broadcast journalism including: covering beats; writing and interviewing; and producing news program for television. Corequisite: JOUR 3071L. Prerequisite: JOUR 2032 and JOUR 2031L.

JOUR3083 Photojournalism II (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of news and feature photography. Includes planning and shooting photographs for newspapers and magazines, photojournalistic techniques, and other aspects of photographing for publication. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: JOUR 2332 and JOUR 2331L.

JOUR3093 Web Design for Journalism, Advertising & Public Relations (Sp) Course covers basic UNIX and HTML, and leading web design software. Major focus is on journalistic informational and commercial sites; minor focus on personal pages. Prerequisite: JOUR 2063.

JOUR3123 Feature Writing (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of non-fiction newspaper and magazine feature articles with emphasis on locating subjects, and on writing techniques and practice in article writing. Prerequisite: JOUR 2013.

JOUR3133 Editorial Writing (Irregular) Study of the opinion function of the news media. Includes editorial writing, the newspaper editorial/opinion columns, letters from readers, and broadcast commentary. Prerequisite: JOUR 2013 (or JOUR 2032) and junior standing.

JOUR3163 Sports Journalism (Fa) Emphasis on techniques and principles of coverage of sports and sports-related subjects on and off the field, and on the relationship between sports and the mass media.

JOUR3633 Media Law (Sp, Fa) Constitutional guarantees, statutory laws and court cases applicable to mass communications. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JOUR3723 Advertising Principles (Sp, Fa) Introductory course to the broad field of advertising. The course includes a study of the role of advertising in modern society with emphasis being given to the extent and manner of use of advertising in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and other media. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 2.25 overall grade point average.

JOUR3743 Public Relations Principles (Sp, Fa) Study of theory, methods, and ethics of public relations in modern society, business, and communications. Influencing opinion through acceptable performance and 2-way communication. Recommended for students in many fields. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 2.25 overall grade point average.

JOUR3923H Honors Colloquium (Sp, Fa) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as a part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in journalism).

JOUR401V Advanced Journalistic Practices (Sp, Fa) (1-4) Study of advanced journalistic practices and methods, individual or group projects. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 10 hours of journalism and a 2.5 cumulative grade average.

JOUR402V Internship in Journalism (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Credit for practical experience gained through a journalistic internship. Report required on significant aspect of internship experience. Prerequisite: JOUR major and junior standing and 10 hours JOUR and 2.50 cumulative grade point average. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

JOUR4043 Government and the Media (Fa) Focuses on the links between mass media and government and the increasingly significant role of media in politics and government. Examines the power, responsibility, and performance of the press and public officials/government agencies in their relationship with each other. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JOUR405V Specialized Journalism Seminar (Irregular) (1-3) Primary purpose of course is to enlarge the journalistic skills of students interested in advanced forms of mass communication. Students undertake projects related to particular aspects or problems of journalism. Content varies. May be repeated twice for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JOUR4063 Computer-Assisted Publishing (Irregular) Indepth, hands-on exploration of computer hardware and software in the design and production of media messages. Examination of developing media technologies and the computer's influence on design and conceptualization.

JOUR4143 Public Relations Writing (Sp, Fa) Instructional and writing practice to develop the professional-level writing skills required of public relations practitioners. Emphasizes different approaches required for different audiences and media. Prerequisite: JOUR 1033 with a grade of C or better and JOUR 3723 and JOUR 3743, each with a grade of B or better.

JOUR4233 School Publications (Irregular) Primarily for students intending to teach journalism or to supervise publications in high schools. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

JOUR4333 Ethics in Journalism (Irregular) Critical examination of specific ethical problems confronting professionals in all areas of mass communications. Reading and writing assignments are aimed at familiarizing students with the nature of the mass media and their social responsibilities. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JOUR4413 Broadcast Advertising and Sales (Fa) The creation of advertising campaigns for the broadcast media and techniques involved in the presentation of these campaigns to prospective media buyers. Emphasis is also placed on the gathering and use of rating systems for broadcasting. Prerequisite: JOUR 3723.

JOUR4423 Creative Strategy and Execution (Sp, Fa) The creation of advertising copy and layout for the mass media with emphasis on strategy, the written message, and the physical appearance for the advertisement. Includes laboratory component. Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in both JOUR 3723 and JOUR 3743.

JOUR4453 Media Planning & Strategy (Sp, Fa) Includes the study of media characteristics, market research, media strategies, media analysis, media-market measurements and the development of media plans. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of major mass media strategies, tactics, and planning. Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in both JOUR 3723 and JOUR 3743.

JOUR4463 Campaigns (Sp, Su, Fa) Applying advertising principles and techniques to preparation of a complete campaign; determining agency responsibilities, marketing objectives and research, media mix, and creative strategy. Emphasis also given to campaign presentation delivery, utilizing audio and visual techniques. Prerequisite: JOUR 3723 and JOUR 3743 and JOUR 4423 and JOUR 4453.

JOUR4503 Advanced Feature Writing (Fa) This course is designed for students with proven feature writing skills and basic training, to write a magazine-length, non-fiction, publishable-quality story on a timely subject that has connections to northwest Arkansas. Stories will be published in a student-managed forum. Prerequisite: JOUR 3123.

JOUR4553 Magazine Editing and Production I (Sp, Su, Fa) Instruction with lab work in editing and producing various types of magazines. Course includes magazine design, selecting and editing stories and photographs, laying out the story and photo pages, and other mechanical processes. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week.

JOUR4863 Television News Reporting I (Sp, Fa) Includes the specialized knowledge and skills needed in field reporting, anchoring, writing, and producing news for commercial television. Also incorporates videography, tape editing. Lab component arranged. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: JOUR 3072 and JOUR 3071L.

JOUR4873 Television News Reporting II (Sp, Fa) Continuation of JOUR 4863. Laboratory component arranged. Prerequisite: JOUR 4863.

JOUR4883 Advanced Television News Production (Irregular) Continuation of JOUR 4873. Students prepare and present television newscasts for air. Laboratory component arranged. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: JOUR 4873.

JOUR4903 Community Journalism (Sp) This three-hour course will blend student' reporting and editing skills with instruction on how regional newspapers select and present news to a local audience. This course will instruct students in deciding news stories for regional readers, how those stories can best be written and displayed. The semester goal is to publish a paper. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

JOUR498V Journalism Writing Requirement (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JOUR498VH Honors Journalism Writing Requirement (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

JOUR5003 Advanced Reporting (Irregular) Stresses public affairs coverage, interpretive, investigative, and analytic journalism, involving research, work with documents, public records, and budgets and specialized reporting.

JOUR5033 Critical and Opinion Writing and Commentary (Irregular) Experience in writing and analyzing columns, editorials, criticism, and other forms of opinion and commentary in the media and in examining the media's role as a forum for opinion and commentary and its impact and influence.

JOUR5043 Research Methods in Journalism (Sp, Su, Fa) Research methods of utility in journalism. Emphasis on survey research, electronic data base searching, and traditional library research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or honors program standing.

JOUR5043H Honors Research Methods in Journalism (Sp, Su, Fa) Research methods of utility in journalism. Emphasis on survey research, electronic data base searching, and traditional library research. Prerequisite: graduate standing or honors program standing. JOUR5063 Issues in Advertising and Public Relations (Fa) Seminar course involving the critical examination of the major cultural, social, political, economic, ethical, and persuasion theories and/or issues relevant to advertising and public relations affecting individuals, organizations, societies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

JOUR5073 Propaganda and Public Opinion (Irregular) Examines and analyzes the means of influencing and measuring public opinion, with an emphasis on survey research and polling.

JOUR5183 International Mass Communications (Sp, Su, Fa) Examination of national media systems, issues in international communications, the role of the media in coverage of international affairs, and the impact of new technologies on mass communications.

JOUR5193 Professional Journalism Seminar (Irregular) Examination of complex problems encountered by professional journalists with focus on research and analysis of the role of journalism in major social, economic, and political developments. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

JOUR5233 Media and Public Policy (Irregular) Focuses on the interaction between media, politics, government, and public policy, particularly on the impact and influence of the media on the public policy agenda.

JOUR5313 Literature of Journalism (Irregular) A study of superior works of non-fiction journalism, past and present. Includes authors from Daniel Defoe to John McPhee.

JOUR5323 Documentary Production I (Fa) In-depth study of documentary film as non-fiction, long form journalism. Covers subject, funding, research and development, pre-production planning, field production, talent, music, post production, promotion, broadcast and distribution. Required trip to Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival.

JOUR5333 Documentary Production II (Sp) A continuation of JOUR 5323, Documentary Production I. Students photograph, write, and edit a documentary begun in the fall semester. Prerequisite: JOUR 5323.

JOUR600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Required of all M.A. journalism students.

(KINS) Kinesiology

KINS2223 Motor Development (Sp, Su, Fa) An overview of contemporary motor development and movement theory, developmental hierarchies, and physiological aspects of development throughout the lifespan.

KINS2393 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (Irregular) Introduction to the prevention and care of athletic related injuries. Includes athletic injury recognition and management. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L.

KINS2733 Seminar in Exercise Science (Sp) This class will cover special topics for the Exercise Science students in preparation for entry into the profession. In addition to specific topics, students will prepare their resumes and make a formal presentation.

KINS3153 Exercise Physiology (Su, Fa) Examination of effects of exercise on the physiology of the systems of the body. The exploration includes effects during, immediately after, and as long term results of work and exercise. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L.

KINS3153H Honors Exercise Physiology (Sp, Su, Fa) Examination of effects of exercise on the physiology of the systems of the body. The exploration includes effects during, immediately after, and as long term results of work and exercise. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L.

KINS3163 Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application (Sp, Fa) Examination of the changes during childhood and adolescence of physiological responses to exercise. The exploration includes the study of the maturation of the body's functional capacities as it relates to exercise. Designed for Physical Education Teacher Education majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L and KINS 2223; for K-12 or P-12 physical education majors only.

KINS3163H Honors Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application (Sp, Fa) Examination of the changes during childhood and adolescence of physiological responses to exercise. The exploration includes the study of the maturation of the body's functional capacities as it relates to exercise. Designed for Physical Education Teacher Education majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L and KINS 2223; for K-12 physical education majors only.

KINS3353 Mechanics of Human Movement (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to basic analysis of motor skills. No credit given toward major in Zoology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L. (Same as BIOL 3353)

KINS3353H Honors Mechanics of Human Movement (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to basic analysis of motor skills. No credit given toward major in Zoology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2443 and BIOL 2441L. (Same as BIOL 3353)

KINS3373 Philosophical/Sociocultural Impact on Kinesiology (Sp, Su, Fa) An investigation of the philosophical and sociocultural impact on Kinesiology.

KINS3533 Laboratory Techniques (Sp, Fa) Practical experience in testing physical fitness in both the laboratory and non-laboratory settings. Prerequisite: KINS 3153.

KINS3533H Honors Lab Techniques (Sp, Fa) Practical experience in testing physical fitness in both the laboratory and non-laboratory settings. Prerequisite: KINS 3153.

KINS405V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Provides students an opportunity to pursue special study of research problems. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

KINS405VH Honors Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Provides students an opportunity to pursue special study of research problems. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

KINS4323 Analytical Basis of Movement Science (Sp) Study of the practical applications of biomechanical and physiological principles. Prerequisite: KINS 3353 and KINS 3533.

KINS4413 Organization, Management, and Marketing Skills for the Kinesiology Professional (Sp, Fa) Organizational policies, management principles, and marketing skills for the Kinesiology professional.

KINS4773 Performance and Drugs (Sp) The pharmacological and physiological effects of ergogenic aids upon the athlete and performance coupled with the ethical and moralistic viewpoints of drug taking. Practical laboratory experiences are provided with pertinent statistical surveys of athletes; their drug taking habits and relevant psychological impact on performance. Prerequisite: KINS 3153.

KINS4833 Exercise Applications for Special Populations (Fa) The study of the effects of exercise, exercise training, and other stressors in special groups. A detailed study of the biomechanical and physiological effects of exercise on the elderly, the diabetic, the post-coronary, and the individual with functional limitations. Prerequisite: KINS 3353 and KINS 3533.

KINS4833H Honors Exercise Applications for Special Populations (Fa) The study of the effects of exercise, exercise training, and other stressors in special groups. A detailed study of the biomechanical and physiological effects of exercise on the elderly, the diabetic, the post-coronary, and the individual with functional limitations. Prerequisite: KINS 3353 and KINS 3533.

KINS4903 Internship in Exercise Science (Sp, Fa) Provides opportunities for students in Exercise Science to gain experience in clinics, hospitals, fitness centers, athletic training facilities or related settings. Enrollment is limited to students in exercise science having taken KINS 3353 and KINS 3533. Prerequisite: KINS 3353 and KINS 3533. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

KINS5212 Athletic Training Clinical I - Application of Athletic Preventive Devices (Su) This course will serve as an introduction to the athletic training clinical program. Procedures and policies of the clinical program and application of athletic preventive devices will be included as well. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in athletic training.

KINS5222 Athletic Training Clinical II - Evaluation Lab - Lower Extremity (Fa) This course will serve as a process for monitoring student's progression of athletic training proficiencies, acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer, and reinforce the evaluation skills of gait, lower extremity, and spine/pelvis. Prerequisite: KINS 5212.

KINS5232 Athletic Training Clinical III - Evaluation - Upper Extremity (Sp) This course will serve as a process for monitoring student's progression of athletic training competencies, acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer, and reinforce the evaluation skills of the upper extremities, head, neck, and posture. Prerequisite: KINS 5222.

KINS5242 Athletic Training Clinical IV - Emergency Procedures/Modality Lab (Su) This course will serve as a process for monitoring student's progression of athletic training competencies, acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer, and reinforce and instruct new emergency procedures and serve as a lab for therapeutic modalities. Prerequisite: KINS 5232.

KINS5252 Athletic Training Clinical V - Rehabilitation Lab (Fa) This course will serve as a process for monitoring student's progression of athletic training competencies, acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer, and reinforce techniques and applications of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: KINS 5242

KINS5262 Athletic Training Clinical VI - Athletic Training Seminar (Sp) This course will serve as a process for monitoring student's progression of athletic training competencies, acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer, and serve as a capstone course validating the athletic training clinical proficiencies and prepare students for the NATABOC certification exam and future employment. Prerequisite: KINS 5252.

KINS5323 Biomechanics I (Fa) Intended to serve as in introduction to biomechanics and focuses on scientific principles involved in understanding and analyzing human motion.

KINS5333 Instrumentation in Biomechanics (Odd years, Sp) The application of knowledge and skills necessary for data collection for sports analysis. Provides valuable information on instrumentation used specifically in biomechanics. Prerequisite: KINS 5323.

KINS5363 Evaluation Techniques of Athletic Injuries - Upper Extremity (Sp) Use of scientific assessment methods to recognize and evaluate the nature and severity of athletic injuries to the upper extremities, trunk, and head. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate athletic training program.

KINS5373 Evaluation Techniques of Athletic Injuries - Lower Extremity (Fa) Use of scientific assessment methods to recognize and evaluate the nature and severity of athletic injuries to the hip and lower extremities. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate athletic training program.

KINS5423 Assessment and Prescriptive Programming in Adapted KINS (Odd years, Sp) Instruction in the assessment, prescription, and use of instruction methods, materials, and equipment relevant to specific handicapping conditions in the adapted physical education setting.

KINS5453 Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training (Fa) Contemporary therapeutic modalities used in managing athletic injuries. Modalities covered are classified as thermal agents, electrical agents, or mechanical agents. Emphasis is placed on their physiological effects, therapeutic indications (and contraindications), and clinical application. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate athletic training program.

KINS5463 Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries (Fa) A systematic approach to exercise program development, techniques, indications and contraindications of exercise, and progression as related to athletic injury, prevention, and return to play guidelines. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate athletic training program.

KINS5473 Administration in Athletic Training (Su) Administrative components of athletic training. Basic concepts of legal liability, leadership and management principles, financial management, day to day scheduling and supervision, maintenance, and general administration. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate athletic training program.

KINS5483 Medical Conditions in Athletic Training (Fa) This course will provide a collection of knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate athletic training program or permission of instructor.

KINS5493 Practicum in Adapted Physical Education (Irregular) Deals with the application of skills, knowledge and concepts necessary for planning, organizing and conducting adapted physical education programs through supervised field experiences.

KINS5513 Physiology Exercise I (Fa) A study of the foundation literature in exercise physiology. Emphasis is placed on the muscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems.

KINS5523 Muscle Metabolism in Exercise (Sp) A study of the metabolic changes that occur in muscle as a result of exercise, exercise training, and other stressors. Prerequisite: KINS 5513 or equivalent.

KINS5533 Cardiac Rehabilitation Program (Odd years, Fa) An examination of the concepts, design, and implementation of cardiac rehabilitation programs. Emphasis on exercise programs but reference to nutrition, psychology, and other lifestyle interventions.

KINS5543 Cardiovascular Function in Exercise (Fa) Study of the effects of exercise training and other stressors on the cardiovascular system. Detailed study of the components of the cardiovascular system and the responses and adaptations of those components to selected stimuli. Prerequisite: KINS 5513 or equivalent.

KINS5593 Practicum in Laboratory Instrumentation (Su, Fa) Practical experience in testing physical fitness utilizing laboratory equipment. Objective is to quantify physiological parameters, leading to the individualized exercise prescription.

KINS5613 Physical Dimensions of Aging (Even years, Sp) This course will focus on the physiological changes with healthy aging, pathophysiology of age-related diseases, testing issues, exercise interventions, and the psychosocial aspects of aging. Prerequisite: KINS 5513.

KINS5643 Motor Learning (Sp) Concepts of motor learning and control are presented. Attention is given to an analysis of the literature in movement control, motor behavior, and motor learning.

KINS574V Internship (Sp) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

KINS5753 Sport Psychology (Su) Investigation of historical and contemporary research in sport psychology. Prerequisite: HKRD 5353.

KINS5773 Performance and Drugs (Sp) The pharmacological and physiological effects of ergogenic aids upon the athlete and performance coupled with the ethical and moralistic viewpoints of drug taking. Practical laboratory experiences are provided with pertinent statistical surveys of athletes; their drug taking habits and relevant psychological impact on performance. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L or equivalent.

KINS589V Independent Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Development, implementation, and completion of basic or applied research project. Prerequisite: M.S. degree program in exercise and movement sciences and HKRD 5353 and EDFD 5393.

KINS600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

KINS605V Independent Study (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Provides students with an opportunity to pursue special study of educational problems. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

KINS6323 Biomechanics II (Even years, Sp) Analysis of human movement with emphasis on sports skills by application of principles of anatomy, kinesiology, and cinematographical analysis. Prerequisite: KINS 5323.

KINS6343 Physiology of Exercise II (Even years, Su) Detailed study of the body systems affected by exercise, the functions of these systems during exercise, the effects of age, sex, body type, and nutrition on capacity for exercise, the techniques of assessing work capacity, and a critical analysis of research literature in this area.

KINS674V Internship (Irregular) (1-3) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

(LARC) Landscape Architecture

LARC1003 Basic Course in the Arts: The American Landscape (Sp, Fa) Mankind's changing attitudes toward urban and rural outdoor spaces and their aesthetic and cultural values. The origins of the environmental/conservation movement and the development of an American land ethic. Appreciation of the relationship of the natural and historic landscape to the arts and the aesthetic importance of open space.

LARC1011 Leadership by Design I (Fa) Introduces time management, study strategies, promotes solutions for maintaining personal health, and develops communication and leadership skills intended to benefit education, career, and the community.

LARC1021 Leadership By Design II (Sp) Introduces time management, study strategies, promotes solutions for maintaining personal health, and develops communication and leadership skills intended to benefit education, career, and the community. Continuation of LARC 1011.

LARC1211 Introduction to Landscape Architecture I (Fa) This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to basic principles of design, the natural landscape, urbanism and the public realm. Lecture is one hour per week. Corequisite: LARC 1315.

LARC1221 Introduction to Landscape Architecture II (Sp) Theoretical, formal, and constructive principles and their impact in the design discipline, modernism and after. Introduction to the intellectual and philosophical foundations of landscape architecture. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: LARC 1211 and LARC 1315. Corequisite: LARC 1325.

LARC1315 Landscape Architecture Design I (Fa) Theory and craft of seeing, drawing, and model-building to record and communicate a design. Basic design principles with architectural and natural geometries are introduced and employed. Studio and lecture. Corequisite: LARC 1211.

LARC1325 Landscape Architecture Design II (Sp) Basic concepts of spatial, visual and experiential analysis are used in the investigation and evaluation of designed landscapes. Introduction to three-dimensional spatial organization systems and supporting principles. Continued drawing exercises and analysis graphics leading to design conceptualization. Studio and lecture. Corequisite: LARC 1221. Prerequisite: LARC 1315 and LARC 1211.

LARC2113 Design Communications I (Fa) Aimed at visualization of the design process from conception to completion. Provides a means to effectively communicate, evaluate, synthesize and refine ideas. Aimed at teaching various levels of graphics associated with the design process. Communication of ideas through various techniques is explored and the computer is introduced as a graphics tool and as a means of organizing ideas in a creative, yet orderly, fashion.

LARC2123 Design Communications II (Sp) Continuation of LARC 2113 with a focus on computer technologies in two-dimensional graphic representation and three-dimensional modeling. Course includes an introduction to computer system use and software such as: CAD, GIS, Photoshop, desk-top publishing, Word, and other professional office programs. Studio and lecture.

LARC2336 Landscape Architecture Design III (Fa) Introduction to design process(s)which responds to site and context. Reinforcement of design principles and organization systems applied to small scale design projects. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 1221 and LARC 1325.

LARC2346 Landscape Architecture Design IV (Sp) (Formerly LARC 3345) Expansion of abilities to analyze existing conditions of site and develop methods for interpreting and synthesizing information and perceptions into spatial design proposals. Emphasis on design form and the use of meaning and landscape narrative applied to increased scale projects within a larger or more complex context. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 2336 and LARC 3413.

LARC2714 Landscape Architecture Construction I (Sp) (Grading) Introduction to landscape architectural construction with an emphasis on grading, earthwork computations, and technical drawing skills. Introduction to roadway alignment, the land survey system, and construction documents. Lecture and laboratory.

LARC302V Special Studies (Irregular) (1-6) Individual or group study and practicum and travel involving landscape design, history, and environmental analysis. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

LARC302VH Honors Special Studies (IR) (1-6) Individual or group study and practicum and travel involving landscape design, history and environmental analysis.

LARC303V Special Projects (Irregular) (1-6) Design implementation, study, practicum, and preparation of working drawings.

LARC303VH Honors Special Projects (IR) (1-6) Design implementation, study, practicum, and preparation of working drawings.

LARC3356 Landscape Architecture Design V (Fa) (Formerly LARC 3355) Investigation of social behavior as applied to program and design that serves human needs. Projects reflect increased scope, scale, and resolution with a detailed design component. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 2346 and LARC 2714; and acceptance into the professional program.

LARC3366 Landscape Architecture Design VI (Sp) (Formerly LARC 4365) Investigation of ecological determinism, historic and contemporary planning, and sustainable design as distinct approaches to landscape architecture. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 3356.

LARC3366H Honors Landscape Architecture Design VI (Sp) Investigation of ecological determinism, historic and contemporary planning, and sustainable design as distinct approaches to landscape architecture. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 3356.

LARC3413 History of Landscape Architecture (Fa) Analysis of the interaction between existing landscapes and human cultural development as reflected in the meaning and organization of landscape designs at community and project scales from the neolithic period to the mid-nineteenth century.

LARC3413H Honors History of Landscape Architecture (Fa) Analysis of the interaction between existing landscapes and human cultural development as reflected in the meaning and organization of landscape designs at community and project scales from the neolithic period to the mid-nineteenth century.

LARC3724 Landscape Construction II (Fa) Introduction to landscape architectural materials and methods of construction and assembly. Emphasis on material properties and how those properties affect the materials use in the landscape and interactions with other materials. Introduction to dimensioning and layout systems and parking requirements with increased complexity of construction documents. Lecture and laboratory.

LARC3734 Landscape Architecture Construction III (Sp) (Structures) Introduction into the design and fabrication methods of structures in the landscape. Emphasis on statics in calculating sizes and selection of materials for free-standing and retaining walls, and wooden structures. Advanced technical drawing component and computer integration of drawing production. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 3723.

LARC3734H Honors Landscape Architecture Construction III (Sp) (Structures) Introduction into the design and fabrication methods of structures in the landscape. Emphasis on statics in calculating sizes and selection of materials for free-standing and retaining walls, and wooden structures. Advanced technical drawing component and computer integration of drawing production. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 3723.

LARC3821 Study Abroad Preparation (Sp) Orientation to the geography, history, and culture of the countries and sites to be studied in the study abroad program. Lecture.

LARC3914 Planting Design I (Fa) Introduction to small scale projects involving use of plant materials in relation to other landscape elements, formulation of a vocabulary of plant materials and preparation of integrated planting plans and applicable specifications. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: HORT 3103.

LARC3924 Ecological Design (Irregular) Continuation of LARC 3914 emphasizing a change in scale of projects to include medium and large scale projects, and increasing complexity in dealing with more complicated and varied planting designs and applicable specifications. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 3914 and HORT 3103.

LARC3933 Cultural Landscape Studies (Su) The examination of landscape forms, and their historic and evolutionary development. Includes study of cultural, political, and site context influences. Required field trip component of study abroad. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 3821.

LARC4123 Urban Form Studies (Su) The examination of urban, village, and suburban form and its influencing forces. Includes study of cultural forces, technological developments, and physical shape, scale, and materials that define urban areas. Required field trip component of study abroad. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 3821.

LARC4376 Landscape Architecture Design VII (Fa) (Formerly LARC 4375) Synthesis of all previous course work; an introduction to the theory and practice of larger scale planning with an emphasis on design of systems in urbanizing environments. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 3366 and LARC 4413.

LARC4376H Honors Landscape Architecture Design VII (Fa) Synthesis of all previous course work; an introduction to the theory and practice of larger scale planning with an emphasis on design of systems in urbanizing environments. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 3366 and LARC 4413.

LARC4383 Senior Project Preparation (Sp) (Formerly LARC 4381) Definition and planning of personally selected senior demonstration project. Requires full documentation of topical research, program development, site data collection, site analysis, and site project base maps. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 4376

LARC4383H Honors Senior Project Preparation (Sp) Definition and planning of personally selected senior demonstration project. Requires full documentation of topical research, program development, site data collection, site analysis, and site project base maps. Studio and lecture. Prerequisite: LARC 4376.

LARC4413 Contemporary Landscape Architecture (Sp) Critical study and analysis of landscape architecture from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis on the philosophical and design theories that have influenced the form of gardens, parks, and cities.

LARC4413H Honors Contemporary Landscape Architecture (Sp) Critical study and analysis of landscape architecture from mid-nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis on the philosophical and design theories that have influenced the form of gardens, parks, and cities.

LARC4714 Landscape Architecture Construction IV (Fa) (Systems) Introduction to systems of landscape architectural construction including stormwater management, lighting, irrigation, water features, and erosion control. Emphasis on an advanced grading and landform manipulation skills, and stormwater system design and calculations. Significant integration of computer generated drawings. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 2714.

LARC4714H Honors Landscape Architecture Construction IV (Fa) (Systems) Introduction to systems of landscape architectural construction including stormwater management, lighting, irrigation, water features, and erosion control. Emphasis on an advanced grading and landform manipulation skills, and stormwater system design and calculations. Significant integration of computer generated drawings. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 2714.

LARC4743 Site Planning for Non-Landscape Architects (Irregular) Problems in analysis and synthesis of elements used in landscape with emphasis on grading and drainage and the relationship of structure to site. Lecture and laboratory 6 hours per week.

LARC5043 Landscape Architecture Seminar (Irregular) The role of the landscape architect in contemporary society; how this is affected by technological change and awareness of ecological problems. Group discussions, individual research projects, and guest lectures. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.

LARC5053 Historic Landscape Preservation (Irregular) Survey of historic preservation as a profession and the emerging cultural landscape preservation movement. Introduction to preservation principles as described by the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines. Analysis of case studies will reinforce basic philosophies and introduce preservation approaches. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 4413.

LARC5063 Alternative Stormwater Management (Irregular) Introduction to the role of alternative stormwater management techniques toward a more sustainable development to include constructed wetlands, bioswales, rain water harvesting, green roofs, and other stormwater reduction techniques. Emphasis on multidisciplinary team approach to problem solving. This course is open to non-majors and includes both lecture and laboratory time.

LARC5386 Landscape Architecture Design VIII (Senior Demonstration Project) (Fa) (Formerly LARC 5385) Advanced design studio with an emphasis on individual or team research and design resolution. Includes all aspects of design process: inventory, programming, graphic documentation, formal oral presentation, and a written report. Prerequisite: LARC 4383 and LARC 4376.

LARC5613 Landscape Architectural Practice and Project Manual (Sp) Professional responsibilities and related aspects of landscape architecture practice: ethics; office organization; client, contractor and landscape architect relationships; legal issues, contracts and documents; regulations; review of bidding and contractual documents.

(LAST) Latin American Studies

LAST2013 Latin American Studies (Fa) This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America. Drawing on Latin American literature, history, sociology, and political science, the course examines the broad forces that have shaped the region. (Same as ANTH 2013)

LAST3013 Modern Latin American Literature in Translation (Irregular) This course introduces the rich cultural diversity and sociohistorical complexity of Latin America, through the exploration of outstanding and representative examples of the region's modern literature.

LAST399VH Honors Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing.

LAST4003 Latin American Studies Colloquium (Sp) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject of investigation, required of all Latin American studies majors. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing for Latin American studies majors and honors students. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

LAST4003H Honors Latin American Studies Colloquium (Sp) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject of investigation, required of all Latin American studies majors. Prerequisite: sophomore standing for Latin American studies majors and honors students. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

(LATN) Latin

LATN1003 Elementary Latin I (Fa) The rudiments of classical Latin, with concentration on grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Short selections from ancient authors lead to basic reading ability.

LATN1013 Elementary Latin II (Sp) A continuation of the rudiments of classical Latin, with concentration on grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Short selections from ancient authors lead to basic reading ability.

LATN2003 Petronius' Satyricon (Fa) Development of reading skills through selections from Satyricon, and an introduction to imperial history and culture through critical study of the novel in translation.

LATN2013 Catullus (Sp) Development of reading skills through selections from Catullus' poems, and an introduction to the culture and history of the late republic through critical study of Catullus in translation and secondary works.

LATN3003 Virgil and Ovid (Fa) Selections from the Aeneid and/or the Metamorphoses, and an introduction to Roman literary history through the critical study of these works in translation. Prerequisite: LATN 2013 or equivalent.

LATN3013 Caesar (Sp) Selected readings from Caesar's commentaries on Gallic or Civil Wars, and an overview of Republican political and military history through the critical study of the commentaries in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3003 or equivalent.

LATN3063 Intensive Elementary Latin Reading (Su) Overview of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax, leading to reading prose texts. For undergraduates who want short, intensive introduction to Latin and graduate students working towards reading proficiency. Successful completion fulfills graduate student research reading proficiency requirement. LATN 3063 alone cannot fulfill the Foreign Language requirement in Fulbright College. No credit for this course and LATN 1003 and/or 1013.

LATN4003 Roman History (Irregular) Selections from Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, or Suetonius. An overview of Roman Historiography through the critical study of complete works in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3013 or equivalent.

LATN4043 Roman Elegy (Irregular) Selections from Propertius, Tibullus, or Ovid. An overview of the genre through the critical study of complete works in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3013 or equivalent.

LATN4063 Roman Pastoral and Lyric (Irregular) Selections from Catullus, Virgil's Eclogues, Horace's Odes, or Calpurnius Siculus. An overview of the two genres through the critical study of complete works in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3013 or equivalent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

LATN4073 Roman Novel (Irregular) Selections from Petronius or Apuleius. An overview of the genre through the critical study of complete works in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3013 or equivalent.

LATN4083 Roman Oratory (Irregular) Selections from the orations and theoretical works of Cicero, Seneca the Elder, or Quintilian. An overview of the genre through the critical study of complete works in translation and secondary works. Prerequisite: LATN 3013 or equivalent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

LATN475V Special Investigations (Irregular) (1-6)

LATN5633 Medieval Latin (Irregular) Selections from medieval writers from the 4th to the 17th century. Prerequisite: LATN 3003 or equivalent.

LATN575V Special Investigations (Irregular) (1-6)

(LAWW) Law

LAWW400V Entertainment Law (Irregular) (1-6) Examines the legal principles and relationships of the entertainment industry, with a primary emphasis on the music industry; provides an introduction to the practice of entertainment law and the negotiation of entertainment contracts; highlights a variety of legal and practical issues that arise when representing clients in the entertainment industry.

LAWW4012 Legal Research & Writing II (Sp) An introduction to the persuasive writing for trial and appellate courts. Emphasis will be placed on intermediate library research techniques and basic legal research using computers. Students will also engage in brief-writing and appellate argumentation.

LAWW4013 Legal Research & Writing I (Fa) An introduction to the special problems posed by the legal analysis and the expression of the results of that process. The primary emphasis will be on basic legal analysis techniques, basic legal writing skills, and proper citation form. Students will complete a series of writing assignments.

LAWW4022 Legal Research & Writing III (Sp, Su, Fa) Small section experience (15 students per section) in legal research and writing; advanced legal research techniques and advanced writing assignments. Courses certified as LRW III courses must include the writing process as the central focus of the class experience. Must be taken in the 3rd or 4th semester. Topic varies; students may take more than one topic but must take at least one LRW III course. Prerequisite: LAWW 4013 and LAWW 4012. May be repeated for up to 10 hours of degree credit.

LAWW4023 Contracts I (Sp, Su, Fa) Formation and enforcement by litigation and commercial arbitration of commercial and family agreements. Mutual assent or consideration; third-party beneficiaries; assignments; joint obligation; performance; anticipatory breach; discharge of contractual duties; and the Statute of Frauds.

LAWW4033 Contracts II (Sp, Su, Fa) Contract interpretation and enforcement, remedies for breach, including anticipatory breach, justifications for breach, third party beneficiaries, assignment and delegation. Prerequisite: LAWW 4023

LAWW4053 Property I (Sp, Su, Fa) Emphasis is on real property. Basic concepts are covered, including property rights in lost and found articles (general property concepts), types and historical origins of estates, and other interests in land. Property transfer techniques, such as gifts, leases (landlord and tenant) and the sale of land are also considered. Land transfer techniques, including the land sale contract, the deed, the recording system, and methods of real property title assurance are discussed. Certain aspects of land use controls explored briefly.

LAWW4073 Criminal Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Deals with the questions of what conduct society punishes through a criminal code and of the appropriate punishment for the forbidden conduct. In this context the course includes an analysis of the theories of punishment, the definitions of various crimes, the defenses available to one charged with criminal conduct, and the limitations placed by the Constitution on governmental power in the criminal law area. Throughout the course, special emphasis is placed on the appropriate role of the legislature and the courts, and the problem faced by them in devising and administering a criminal code.

LAWW4103 Civil Procedure I (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the process of civil litigations from such preliminary matters as court selection and jurisdiction to appeal and collateral attack of final judgments. Some attempt is made to cover the antecedents of modern procedure; where appropriate, suggestions for reform are developed in class discussion. Emphasis is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedures and on code pleading and common law procedure used in state court systems.

LAWW4144 Torts (Sp, Su, Fa)

LAWW4153 Property II (Sp, Su, Fa) Emphasis is on real property. Basic concepts are covered, including property rights in lost and found articles (general property concepts), types and historical origins of estates, and other interests in land. Property transfer techniques, such as gifts, leases (landlord and tenant), and the sale of land are also considered. Land transfer techniques, including the land sale contract, the deed, the recording system, and methods of real property title assurance are discussed. Certain aspects of land use controls are explored briefly.

LAWW4173 Criminal Procedure (Sp, Su, Fa) Concerned with the legal steps through which a criminal proceeding passes, commencing with the initial investigation of a crime and concluding with the release of the defendant. Does not deal exclusively with constitutional problems, although considerable time is spent on them. Recent Supreme Court decisions receive special emphasis. Criminal Procedure does not deal with criminal tactics or with many of the special problems relating to the introduction of evidence at the trial.

LAWW4203 Civil Procedure II (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the process of civil litigations from such preliminary matters as court selection and jurisdiction to appeal and collateral attack of final judgments. Some attempt is given to cover the antecedents of modern procedure; and where appropriate, suggestions for reform are developed in class discussion. Emphasis is on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and on code pleading and common law procedure used in state court systems.

LAWW4294 Business Organizations (Sp, Su, Fa) Course is constructed around different forms of business organizations, with emphasis on agency and partnership law, and corporation law.

LAWW4442 Law & Accounting (Irregular) Study of basic accounting principles and their importance to attorneys engaged in business related activities. Topics covered include the fundamental accounting equation, the nature of accrual accounting, understanding financial statements, and accounting for assets and liabilities. Also a review of basic principles associated with financial statement analysis and valuation principles. Intended for students with little or no business training, and may not be taken for credit by students who have previously earned 6 or more hours of undergraduate or graduate credit in accounting courses.

LAWW4993 Pre-Trial Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) Develops fundamental lawyer's skills using role-play in simulation exercises that are videotaped and critiqued. Focuses on development of case theory, fact gathering, use of discovery tools, and case planning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II, and Criminal Procedure.

LAWW500V Special Topics (Irregular) (1-18) Included under this heading will be a variety of variable credit law courses taught by law faculty on topics that are not included elsewhere in the curriculum. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

LAWW5013 Professional Responsibility (Irregular) Role of the lawyer as counselor, advocate, and public servant; obligation to society of the individual lawyer and the profession as a whole; ethical problems of the profession; representation of the unpopular cause and the desirable client, lawyers' obligation to law reform; lawyer and the press; the lawyer in public service; the aspects of law office management.

LAWW5023 Remedies (Irregular) Covers equity (jurisdiction and powers of courts of equity, injunctions, including adequacy of legal remedies, balancing of equities, interests protected, and defenses), damages (compensatory, exemplary, and nominal damages; direct and consequential damages; mitigation; special application in contract and tort actions) and restitution (relief afforded by the judicial process, to prevent unjust attention of benefits).

LAWW5024 Remedies (Irregular) Covers equity (jurisdiction and powers of courts of equity, injunctions, including adequacy of legal remedies, balancing of equities, interests protected, and defenses), damages (compensatory, exemplary, and nominal damages; direct and consequential damages; mitigation; special application in contract and tort actions) and restitution (relief afforded by the judicial process, to prevent unjust retention of benefits).

LAWW5063 Education Law (Irregular) Study of law as it applies to public education in America, including the theory of compulsory education, constitutional rights of students and teachers, school financing, equal opportunity in education.

LAWW5073 Domestic Relations (Irregular) Devoted primarily to the problems generated by family relationships. There is a large section on formation and dissolution of marriage. Substantial time is also given to paternity and legitimacy, obligations toward and of children, custody, adoption, guardianship, general property law as it is affected by family relationships, and divorce and custody in the federal system (focusing primarily on enforceability of degrees in one state by courts sitting in another state).

LAWW5083 First Amendment (Irregular) An intensive examination of the legal issues arising under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, with an emphasis on basic free speech doctrines and the dilemmas posed by interplay between the free exercise and establishment clauses.

LAWW5093 Solo Practice Planning (Irregular) Combines elements of professional responsibility and law practice management. This course will satisfy the skills requirement.

LAWW510V Law: Study Abroad (Su) (1-6) Open to law students studying abroad in officially sanctioned programs.

LAWW5114 Constitutional Law (Irregular) An introduction to the basic principles of constitutional law and to current constitutional doctrines and problems. The primary focus will be on the structure of the federal system and on the rights of individuals under the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

LAWW5133 Real Estate Transactions (Sp, Su, Fa) Focuses on real estate transfer, real estate finance and real estate development. Issues relating to the sale of land and conveyances of real property, mortgages and the planning, financing, constructing and marketing of modern real estate developments are treated.

LAWW5163 Administrative Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Course is constructed around Federal materials, but with some state references. Considers the origin and constitutional basis for the administrative process; executive and legislative controls with particular emphasis upon the judicial "control" of the administrative process (delegations, procedural and substantive due process, judicial assistance and enforcement and review of administrative decisions).

LAWW5173 Insurance (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of casualty, fire, and life insurance. Major areas include the duty to defend; duty to settle within policy limits; the definition of what is covered under the policy; insurance marketing; insurable interests; the measure of recovery; disputes between insurers; defenses such as fraud, concealment, and non-cooperation; and government regulation of insurance.

LAWW5183 Drafting Legal Documents (Irregular) This course will study and practice the principles applicable to drafting of non-litigation documents, such as contracts, wills, and legislation. These include organization and categorization of information, definitions, testing of substantive provisions for completeness and consequences, and choices and precision of language.

LAWW5203 Discrimination in Employment (Irregular) An examination of federal constitutional, statutory, and administrative restrictions that prohibit or limit employers, unions and employment agencies from discriminating on the basis of race, sex, religion, age, national origin and color. In addition to the substantive scope of federal law, emphasis given to enforcement procedures and remedies.

LAWW5213 Business Planning (Irregular) Synthesis of legal principles dealing with taxation and form of business organizations to provide guidance in choosing form and operating business entities.

LAWW5223 Negotiations (Irregular) The course will provide instruction in professional skills related to various responsibilities which lawyers are called upon to meet, such as trial and appellate advocacy, alternate methods of dispute resolution, counseling, interviewing, negotiating, problem solving, factual investigation, organization and management of legal work, and drafting, and in analytical processes for applying those skills in ethical faction. Course will satisfy the skills requirement.

LAWW5233 Interviewing and Counseling (Irregular) Course provides instruction in practical aspects of client representation such as drafting, interviewing, counseling, fact gathering, negotiation, and advocacy, and in analytical processes for applying those skills in ethical fashion. In addition to teaching theory attached to skills, the course provides students with practice in these areas through the use of simulated client problems. Course satisfies skills requirement.

LAWW5243 Business and Commercial Torts (Irregular) Course will explore the legal relationship between competition and intangible property. Covers the spectrum of private remedies for competitive wrongs. Course will examine laws relating to such business and commercial torts as unfair competition, misappropriation of trade secrets, trademark infringement, false advertising, etc. Course is designed for students planning to practice in the areas of commercial, corporate, business or intellectual property law.

LAWW5303 International and Domestic Sales and Leasing (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods"

LAWW5313 Negotiable Instruments (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of Articles 3 and 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code dealing with negotiable instruments.

LAWW533V Election Law (Irregular) (1-3)

LAWW5363 Securities Regulation (Sp, Su, Fa) Regulation of issuance of and trading in stocks, bonds and other security by federal and state agencies, with particular reference to the SEC. Not offered every year.

LAWW5504 Decedent's Estates (Sp, Su, Fa)

LAWW5513 Labor Relations in the Private Sector (Sp, Su, Fa) The right to organize; organization of labor unions; strikes; picketing; boycotts; collective bargaining; collective labor agreements and their enforcement; unfair labor practices by employers and by unions; the union member and his union; state labor relations legislation; the National Labor Relations Act and the Labor Management Relations Act. Not offered every year.

LAWW5994 Debtor-Creditor Relations (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and of the remedies of unsecured creditors.

LAWW6013 Alternative Dispute Resolution (Sp, Su, Fa) Deals with the alternative to formal litigation for resolving various types of disputes. The alternatives considered include negotiation, mediation and conciliation, arbitration, "rent-a-judge," and other special procedures. Areas of application include contract and tort disputes, community problems, labor relations, and medical practice controversies. This course will satisfy the skills requirement.

LAWW602V Independent Legal Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Independent legal research conducted under the supervision of faculty members. Ordinarily a student may not accumulate more than two semester hours of credit for Independent Legal Research. This cumulative maximum may be exceeded only by special permission of the dean, who in exceptional circumstances may approve a cumulative maximum credit of three semester hours of credit for Independent Legal Research.

LAWW603V Federal Jurisdiction (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3) Topics covered usually include constitutional limits on the jurisdiction of Federal courts as well as limitations imposed by Congress. The relations between state courts are problems in diversity and Federal question jurisdiction. Removal procedure is studied, and if time permits, attention is given to venue and related problems.

LAWW6042 Children and the Law (Irregular) Topics include children as legal persons, including minors' right to expression under the First Amendment and their participation in decision-making in legal contexts; children's rights and school authority, including constitutional issues in school discipline and religious expression; foster care; termination of parental rights; and adoption.

LAWW6063 Advanced Evidence (Sp, Su, Fa) Deals with the use of expert witnesses, forensic sciences and scientific evidence, organization of proof, burden of proof, presumptions, and the law of privileges.

LAWW607V Conflict of Laws (Sp, Su, Fa) (2-3) Study of the legal principles involved in problems which have connections with two or more states requiring a choice of law, choice of law in federal courts, and jurisdiction in multi-state situations.

LAWW6083 Arkansas Civil Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) A detailed examination of the civil procedure in the Arkansas trial and appellate courts, building on the basic course in civil procedure. Emphasis is placed on the Arkansas Rules of Civil Procedure; state statutes dealing with procedure, jurisdiction, and venue; the division of labor between the circuit and chancery courts; and enforcement of judgments. Differences between Arkansas and federal civil practice are also explored.

LAWW6093 Basic Evidence (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the rules of evidence under which trials are conducted; the methods by which items of evidence and admitted or excluded; relevancy, real evidence, testimonial proof, and hearsay and its exceptions.

LAWW6103 Jurisprudence (Sp, Su, Fa) Studies of the ideas and methods of law, regardless of particular questions that might be resolved by the law.

LAWW611V Moot Court (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-3)

LAWW6133 Antitrust Law (Irregular) Federal anti-trust laws and their relationship to concentrations of economic power in the contexts of monopoly mergers, price fixing, economic boycotts and discrimination, re-sale price maintenance, dealer franchises, and exclusive dealing. Comparative analysis of free enterprise market and government regulated industries. Recommended for second- and third-year students interested in business practice or government service, as well as social welfare, or students with an interest in the subject.

LAWW6143 Oil and Gas (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the law of oil and gas with emphasis on the interests that may be created in oil and gas, the rights of the landowner, provisions in the oil and gas lease, the rights of assignees, and legislation dealing with production and conservation.

LAWW614V Board of Advocates Credit (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Members of the Board of Advocates may receive ungraded academic credit, to be awarded in the spring semester of the member's third year in law school, upon completion of duties for the fall and spring semesters.

LAWW6152 Elder Law Seminar (Irregular) In-depth treatment of selected problems of elderly persons in seminar format.

LAWW616V Law Review Credit (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4)

LAWW6182 Advanced Torts: Dignitary and Economic Harm (Irregular) Course will cover defamation, the rights of privacy (including information privacy) and publicity, harm to family relationships, malicious prosecution and interference with common law civil rights.

LAWW618V Journal of Food Law & Policy Credit (Sp) (1-5) Students receive credit for completion of duties on the Law School's publication of The Journal of Food Law & Policy.

LAWW6192 Workers' Compensation (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of state legislation providing remedies for workers injured in the course of their employment. Not offered every year.

LAWW6193 Social Legislation (Sp, Su, Fa) Examination of the various statutes (exclusive of the employment discrimination laws) governing the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers, including unemployment legislation, COBRA, EPPA, ERISA, FLSA, OSHA, USERRA, and WARN.

LAWW6203 Trial Advocacy (Sp, Su, Fa) An introduction to actual trial work and trial techniques through simulated exercises and the conduct of a mock trial. This course will satisfy the skills requirement.

LAWW6213 Product Liability (Sp, Su, Fa) An intensive study of the area including a review of the theories of liability; the concepts of product and defect; potential defendants; defenses; problems of proof and causation.

LAWW6233 Federal Income Tax of Individuals (Sp, Su, Fa) Fundamentals of the federal income taxation of individuals. Topics covered include gross income, deductions, assignments of income, basis, taxation of property transactions, and tax accounting.

LAWW6243 Federal Estate and Gift Taxation (Sp, Su, Fa) Fundamentals of the federal estate and gift transfer tax system. Topics covered include the determination of gifts for tax purposes, amounts included in decedents' gross estates, valuation, deductions and credits.

LAWW6253 Federal Income Taxation of Business Entities (Sp, Su, Fa) Focus on tax issues in business formation, operation, distributions, and liquidations. Prerequisite: LAWW 6233

LAWW6262 Estate Planning (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the role of lawyers (including ethical considerations) in fact gathering and analysis of data; testamentary and nonprobate transfers; planning for incapacity; Medicaid, income tax, and transfer tax considerations in small and large estates; gift techniques; planning for the surviving spouse; revocable and irrevocable trusts; life insurance; disposition of business interests; and post-mortem tax planning. Unless waived by the instructor, prerequisite for taking the course shall be the successful completion of either Decedents' Estates or Federal Estate and Gift Taxation.

LAWW629V Advanced Corporations (Irregular) (1-4) Classical corporations law. Formation of corporations, duties and powers of corporate management, corporate control, shareholder rights, shares, dividends, derivative suits, fundamental changes and dissolution.

LAWW6303 WTO, NAFTA, and EU Law (Irregular) The problem of doing business abroad considered from the standpoint of the regulations of foreign trade and direct investment.

LAWW632V Poverty Law: Theory and Practice (Irregular) (1-6) History of anti-poverty programs, the constitutional requirements for such programs. Legal and administrative characteristics of major American income-maintenance programs. Topics include the structure of programs, discretion, the protections of clients, social reform groups, and welfare reform. Prerequisite: LAWW 5114.

LAWW633V Intellectual Property (Irregular) (2-3) This course involves an introductory survey of topics in intellectual property, including copyright, trademark, patent, and unfair competition issues. If time permits, the course may also cover certain aspects of e-commerce.

LAWW6343 Conflict Resolution (Irregular) Explores methods utilized in the legal profession for resolving disputes. Students develop skills by participating in simulation exercises designed to identify and apply processes. Class readings/discussion on theory and practice will be followed by student simulations. Designed for second and third year law students.

LAWW6366 Legal Clinic: Immigration (Irregular) Immigration Clinic will provide opportunities for students preparing for a career in immigration law or general practice by developing skills that are critical in legal practice through an experiential learning model. Working under the supervision of a clinical faculty member, students will represent sectors of the immigrant population for graded credit. Criminal Procedure and Professional Responsibility are prerequisites, as well as the completion of at least forty-eight credit hours prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: LAWW 4143, 5013.

LAWW6373 Legal Clinic (Federal Practice) (Sp, Su, Fa) Students receive clinical legal experiences in federal courts and before federal administrative agencies. Although the particular experiences vary, Chapter 7 (no asset) bankruptcies and farm foreclosures are often emphasized.

LAWW6383 General Practice Clinic (Su) (First Offered Summer 2002) Students will integrate, extend, and refine their legal knowledge and lawyering skills through representation of clients in civil cases pending before Arkansas Circuit and Chancery Courts, federal bankruptcy or administrative cases pending before the U.S. Bankruptcy Court and Administrative Law Judges, and prosecution of criminal misdemeanor cases. Students are responsible for all aspects of representation including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, pleading and discovery practice, and trial advocacy. This course offers students a practice experience similar to that experienced by many lawyers practicing in small to medium sized firms in Arkansas and other states in the region. Prerequisite: Unless waived by the instructor, a cumulative GPA of 2.00; successful completion of 48 semester hours of offerings, including LAWW 4103, LAWW 4203, LAWW 4173, LAWW 6093, and LAWW 5013; and qualifying for Rule XV practice.

LAWW6393 Legal Clinic (Transactional) (Irregular) Students receive clinical legal experience counseling and representing non-profit organizations serving Northwest Arkansas in a wide range of non-litigation business law matters. Services include startup, incorporation, obtaining federal and state tax exemptions, change of business form, purchase and lease of real and personal property, employment and labor law issues, and general contract negotiation, drafting and execution. In addition, students prepare and participate as presenters in a workshop on matters of general interest to non-profit organizations. Legal Clinic Faculty supervise and review the student attorney's work, and provide personal feedback to the individual student attorneys. Prerequisite: Qualification for Rule XV practice.

LAWW6403 Land Use (Sp, Su, Fa) Covers public land use controls such as zoning, subdivision regulations, and eminent domain (including private property rights, takings, and inverse condemnation). Heavy emphasis is placed on planning at state and local levels.

LAWW6433 Legal Clinic: Innocence Project (Irregular) This clinic works in conjunction with the Innocence Project, Arkansas to provide pro bono representation to individuals committed to the Arkansas Department of Corrections where available evidence establishes proof of the client's actual innocence. Students are responsible for all aspects of the representation including: case review, investigation, development of lay and expert testimony, pleading, briefing, discovery, and assistance in court proceedings. The Innocence Project, Arkansas is an Arkansas non-profit corporation. Students must be Rule XV eligible and have taken Trial Advocacy. The Innocence Project Clinic is a 3 credit course.

LAWW6443 Legal History (Sp, Su, Fa) Investigation of English and American legal institutions and doctrines. Emphasis on early American (colonial) and 19th Century developments in the law.

LAWW6453 American Legal History (Irregular) An examination of major themes in American legal history, with an emphasis on the origins and meaning of the United States Constitution. Various topics will be explored in the light of the original understandings, developments over time, and current interpretations by the courts and the body politic.

LAWW6473 Legal Clinic (Criminal Prosecution) (Sp) Students in this course will have the opportunity to extend and refine their lawyering skills, knowledge of substantive law, and mastery of criminal procedure through prosecution of misdemeanor crimes on behalf of the State in Municipal Court. Students are fully responsible for the cases assigned to them. Their responsibilities include assessing the charges and investigation of law enforcement, interviewing witnesses, conducting discovery, evaluating cases for an agreed upon resolution, negotiating with defense counsel and pro se defendants, responding to suppression and other defense motions, trial preparation, and trying cases to the court. The preparation and performance of student attorneys is supervised by clinic faculty who provide personal feedback to the individual students. Prerequisite: Unless waived by the instructor, prerequisites for taking the course shall be a cumulative grade point average of 2.00; the successful completion of 48 semester hours of offerings, including Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, and Professional Responsibility; and qualifying for Rule XV practice.

LAWW6513 Immigration Law and Policy (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of immigration and nationality, including exclusion and deportation; political asylum and refugee status; visa allocation and distribution; labor certification; and naturalization and citizenship. It is recommended that Administrative Law be taken first.

LAWW6523 Employment Law (Sp, Su, Fa) An overview of the law governing various aspects of the employment relationship, both statutory and common law. Covers the establishment and parameters of employment, the security of the worker, employer's rights, and terminations.

LAWW6613 Bankruptcy (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of insolvency law, with particular emphasis on federal bankruptcy law.

LAWW6623 Sentencing and Post-Conviction Remedies (Sp, Su, Fa) Law, theory, and practice of sentencing and post-conviction remedies.

LAWW6633 Advanced Criminal Procedure (Sp) This course focuses on prosecuting crime. Principal topics include: the prosecutor's decision to charge, the role of defense counsel, initial appearance, bail and pretrial release, grand juries and preliminary hearings, discovery, guilty pleas and plea bargaining, speedy trial, double jeopardy, trials and pretrial motions, sentencing and post-conviction remedies. Prerequisite: LAWW 4173.

LAWW6713 Judicial Externship (Sp, Su, Fa) Judicial Externship is an elective externship for second and third year students. Externs shall report to and be under direct supervision of a judge of the federal district court, the bankruptcy court, or a circuit court approved by the externship coordinator. Externs' duties may be determined by the supervising judge and may include work on assigned cases, research, preparation of memoranda, and consultation with full-time law clerks.

LAWW6722 Terrorism, National Security and Human Rights (Irregular) International law issues relating to protection of human rights. Research papers will satisfy upper-level writing requirement.

LAWW6723 Juvenile Justice Externship (Irregular) Juvenile Justice Externship is an elective externship for third year law students. Prerequisites for participating are: successful completion of the Criminal Defense Clinic or the General Practice Clinic; certification under Rule XV of the Arkansas Rules Governing Admission to the Bar; and the advance approval of the faculty member assigned to supervise the externship.

LAWW6812 Legislative Externship (Irregular) Elective externship for third year students. Available only to a student who has successfully completed 48 hours of law credit and has earned a grade of C or higher in Professional Responsibility. Students must disclose whether they have been subject of any prior honor code proceeding which resulted in imposition of any penalty. Extern shall report to and be supervised by either a chief of staff or deputy chief of staff. Duties shall be determined by the field supervisor. Duties may include observation of and assistance in day-to-day operations, special projects, work with federal or state agencies, communications with constituents and other duties as assigned. Prerequisite: 48 hours law credit and grade of C or higher in Professional Responsibility.

LAWW6814 Corporate Counsel Externship (Irregular) Externs work with a supervising attorney in a corporate counsel's office. In Fall and Spring semesters each extern works 16 hours per week (average minimum), and in Summer the extern shall work at least 20 hours per week during the 12-week term; keeps a journal, and meets at least 3 times with the faculty supervisor. Prerequisites: LAWW 4294, LAWW 5013 and approval of the faculty supervisor; recommended: LAWW 6293

LAWW6822 Patent Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the patent system of the United States, including conditions for a valid patent, procedures of the patent office, and litigation relating to patents. Not offered every year.

LAWW6903 ADR in the Workplace (Irregular) Explores the practical as well as the legal problems presented by the use of alternative dispute resolution to resolve employment disputes. The primary focus will be on the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements and individual employment contracts through arbitration, and the use of arbitration to resolve statutory issues such as claims of employment discrimination. There also will be some consideration of other forms of ADR such as mediation, fact-finding, and peer-review systems. Course satisfies the skills requirement.

LAWW6913 Environmental Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Devoted primarily to the legal problems related to the environment. Included is consideration of environmental impact in public and private decision making.

LAWW6923 Legal Clinic (Civil Practice) (Sp, Su, Fa) Students develop skills by working with actual clients in nearby civil courts. Students interview clients, counsel them, negotiate and litigate. The Legal Clinic faculty supervise and review the students' work, and provide personal feedback to individual students. Prerequisite: Cum GPA of 2.00, successful completion of 48 semester hours, including Civil Procedure I and II, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, and Professional Responsibility, and qualifying for Rule XV practice.

LAWW6943 Public International Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Principles of international law involving relations among government. The function of international tribunals and organizations.

LAWW6963 Legal Clinic (Criminal Defense) (Sp, Su, Fa) Students develop skills by representing actual clients charged with misdemeanors in Washington County and nearby counties and clients charged with felonies and misdemeanors in Washington County Juvenile Court. Students interview clients, counsel them, negotiate, and litigate. The Legal Clinic faculty supervise and review the students' work, and provide personal feedback to individual students.

LAWW7012 Juvenile Justice Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) Examines procedural and substantive law in the context of the distinctive goals, structure, and procedure of the Juvenile Court. Special attention is given to alternative ways of dealing with two categories of juveniles, i.e., status offenders who are within the jurisdiction of the court although not accused of criminal conduct, and youthful offenders who commit serious crimes.

LAWW7032 Criminal Justice Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of the theories and practices relating to criminal legislation and incarceration.

LAWW7053 Prosecution Externship (Irregular) Students work in the Washington County Prosecutors office for approximately ten (10) hours each week handling three (3) to four (4) felony cases as well as conducting arraignments, citizen intakes, probable cause hearings, and evaluating warrant requests. Students also attend a weekly seminar in which they discuss various aspects of the criminal justice system. The seminar component provides time for the students to reflect and self-evaluate their work. Prerequisite: LAWW 6473 and Rule XV qualification.

LAWW706V Sports Law (Irregular) (2-3) The major topics covered include significant contract issues, tort liability involving participants, institutions, physicians and equipment manufacturers, criminal liability, drug testing, constitutional and related issues dealing with sports associations and Title 9 and gender equity issues. Other relevant topics may also be covered if possible.

LAWW7072 Advanced Mediation Clinic (Irregular) Students will co-mediate civil cases referred by Courts and agencies. Students will work with experienced mediators and the mediation clinic supervisor, who will review their performances on an individual basis. Students may produce educational programs for various groups. Class discussions will focus on current mediation issues and problems. Pre-requisite: Mediation in Practice.

LAWW7073 Mediation in Practice (Irregular) This three-credit course will train students to mediate disputes assigned to the Northwest Arkansas Dependency-Neglect/Families In Need of Services Mediation Project by the juvenile court. In the first five weeks of the semester, students will be introduced to basic mediation theory, procedures, and ethical constraints; communication techniques; juvenile law; and operation of the child welfare system in Arkansas. This training will include lectures, discussion, and simulation exercises. In the remaining weeks of the semester, students will receive additional information and simulation practice, and they will also observe and participate in the mediation of actual cases assigned to the Project.

LAWW7243 Health Law (Sp, Su, Fa) An examination of the role of the law in determining access to and regulation of the quality of services provided by the health care industry.

LAWW7342 Law and the Internet (IR) This is a survey course. Students will study laws associated with doing business over the internet. A partial list of topics to be covered is: jurisdiction, trademarks, copyrights, patents, contracting, taxation, privacy, obscenity, defamation, and criminal law. The course is highly interactive. In addition to lectures, students will participate in case discussions and presentations.

LAWW760V Bankruptcy - Business Reorganizations (Irregular) (2-3) Examines the rules and tactics governing the reorganization of a struggling business or farm under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. Students will reorganize a hypothetical failing business as a part of the course.

LAWW7612 Advanced Consumer Bankruptcy (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of recent developments in the law of bankruptcy as it applies to consumers and nonconsumers transactions. Prerequisite: LAWW 6602.

LAWW7662 American Indian Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the domestic federal law of the United States as it applies to Native Americans and their tribes. The general concept of tribal self-determination is the unifying theme of the course. Particular topics include tribal sovereignty and government; American Indian civil rights; administration of justice on and off the reservation; American Indian land claims; land, hunting, and fishing rights; water rights; American Indian health, education, and welfare; Bureau of Indian Affairs; state taxation; individual and tribal treaty rights; federal Indian policy; and zoning and environmental controls.

LAWW770V Master's Thesis in Agricultural Law (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-4) Research in a specialized area of agricultural law and development of a scholarly paper containing the results of this research.

LAWW771V Independent Research in Agricultural Law (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-2) Independent research in agricultural law conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

LAWW7753 Agriculture and the Environment (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the application of environmental law to agricultural operations. Topics include soil erosion, takings, pesticide law, the Clean Water Act, the Clear Air Act, common law nuisance, drainage, wildlife, and endangered species.

LAWW7763 Agricultural Finance and Credit (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the legal issues surrounding the financing of agricultural operations, including credit availability, agricultural security issues under the Uniform Commercial Code, and debt restructuring opportunities. Special focus is on lending options offered by the Farm Service Agency and the Farm Credit System.

LAWW7773 Water Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of real property principles governing ownership rights in water and the federal and state statues controlling the use of water.

LAWW7782 Agricultural Labor Law (Sp, Su, Fa) Study of the federal laws that govern the employment of agricultural workers, including wage and hour provisions, laws impacting migrant and seasonal farm workers, immigration issues, occupational safety and health, and child labor laws.

LAWW7783 Agricultural Administrative Procedure and Practice (Sp, Su, Fa) Focus on administrative practice before the USDA and the judicial review of USDA actions involving the federal domestic commodity programs, federal crop insurance, the Packers and Stockyards Act, the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act, and federal marketing Orders.

LAWW7802 Comparative Law Seminar (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of selected foreign legal systems with a focus on the basic differences between those legal institutions and the Anglo-American common law system.

LAWW7822 Corporate Practice Ethics (Irregular) The study, preparation, and/or review of materials, documents, and matters frequently encountered in the organization, operation, and sale or other disposition of both public and closed corporations.

LAWW7862 Food Law (Irregular) An examination of the network of laws that govern food safety and food labeling and a discussion of the efficacy of this network - is it working properly and are consumers well served by it? The course materials will be based on statutory and regulatory law, judicial decisions, and a series of policy readings. Current issues in the news, e.g., mad cow disease, the spinach e-coli outbreak, and the organic standards will be considered in our discussion.

LAWW7912 Government Regulation of Agriculture (Sp, Su, Fa)

(MATH) Mathematics

MATH0003 Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (Sp, Su, Fa) For students who have inadequate preparation for taking MATH 1203. Credit earned in this course may not be applied to the total required for a degree. Corequisite: Lab component.

MATH1203 College Algebra (Fa, Sp, Su,) Topics include the solution and application of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; functions, graphs, and theory of equations; matrix solutions of systems of equations and basic properties of matrices. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 1203 and MATH 1285. Prerequisite: MATH 0003 with a grade of C or better or a score of 22 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 1203C,MATH 1204)

MATH1203C College Algebra (Sp, Su, Fa) Same as MATH 1203 except taught with a co-requisite drill component. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 1203 and MATH 1285. Prerequisite: MATH 0003 with a grade of C or better or a score of 22 on the Math component of the ACT exam. Corequisite: Drill component. (Same as MATH 1203, MATH 1204)

MATH1204 College Algebra with Review (Sp, Su, Fa) Same as MATH 1203 with additional support, increased class time, additional review, and computerized lab component. Only one of MATH 1203, MATH 1204, AND MATH 1285 may be counted for degree credit. Prerequisite: MATH 0003 with C or better or a score of 19 on Math ACT. (Same as MATH 1203, MATH 1203C)

MATH1213 Plane Trigonometry (Sp, Su, Fa) Basic topics in trigonometry including identities, formulas, and polar coordinate system. Credit will be allowed for only one of either MATH 1213 or MATH 1285. Corequisite: MATH 1213L. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam.

MATH1285 Precalculus Mathematics (Sp, Fa) Topics in algebra and trigonometry. To be taken by students who have sucessfully completed Algebra II and a trigonometry course in high school and expect to take MATH 2554. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 1203 and MATH 1285. Prerequisite: A score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam.

MATH2033 Mathematics in Society (Sp, Su, Fa) This course introduces students to a variety of topics in contemporary mathematics, drawn mainly from applications to the social sciences. Topics include graph theory, statistics and voting systems. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or MATH 1204 with a C or better or a score of 24 on Math ACT.

MATH2043 Survey of Calculus (Sp, Su, Fa) Selected topics in elementary calculus and analytic geometry for students in business, agriculture, and social sciences. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 2043 and MATH 2554. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2043C)

MATH2043C Survey of Calculus (Sp, Su, Fa) Selected topics in elementary calculus and analytic geometry for students in business, agriculture, and social sciences. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 2043 and MATH 2554. Co-requisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2043)

MATH2053 Finite Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa) Selected topics in probability and statistics, review of algebraic matrices, and graphic analysis of linear programming for students in business, agriculture, and social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2053C)

MATH2053C Finite Mathematics (Sp, Fa) Selected topics in probability and statistics, review of algebraic matrices, and graphic analysis of linear programming for students in business, agriculture, and social sciences. Taught with a two-day-per-week lecture and one-day-per-week drill. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2053)

MATH2103 Discrete Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa) Introductory study of sets, relations, logic, proofs, algorithms, counting methods, graph theory, trees, and Boolean algebras. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or ACT math score of 21 or above. (Same as MATH 2103C)

MATH2103H Honors Discrete Mathematics (Fa) Introductory study of sets, relations, logic, proofs, algorithms, counting methods, graph theory, trees, and Boolean algebras. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or ACT math score of 21 or above.

MATH2103C Discrete Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa) Introductory study of sets, relations, logic, proofs, algorithms, counting methods, graph theory, trees, and Boolean algebras. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or ACT math score of 21 or above. (Same as MATH 2103)

MATH2183 Mathematical Reasoning in a Quantitative World (Sp, Fa) Mathematical and statistical reasoning are required in contexts of growing complexity and sophistication. The purpose of this course is to cause students to possess the power and habit of mind to search out quantitative information, critique it, reflect upon it, and apply it in their public, personal and professional lives. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better or a score of 23 on the Math component of the ACT exam.

MATH2213 Survey of Mathematical Structures I (Sp, Su, Fa) Sets and logic, systems of numerations, number systems and operations, and elementary number theory. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better.

MATH2223 Survey of Mathematical Structures II (Sp, Su, Fa) Geometry and measurement, and statistics and probability. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 with a grade of C or better.

MATH2554 Calculus I (Sp, Su, Fa) Derivative of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative, introduction of the integral, and applications. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 2554 and MATH 2043. Prerequisite: MATH 1285 or MATH 1213 with a grade of C or better, or a score of 27 on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2554C)

MATH2554H Honors Calculus I (Sp, Su) Topics in analytic geometry and calculus. Students may not receive credit for both MATH 2043 and MATH 2554. Prerequisite: A score of 30 or higher on the Math component of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2554C)

MATH2554C Calculus I (Sp, Su, Fa) Derivative of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative, introduction of the integral, and applications. Credit will be allowed for only one of MATH 2554 and MATH 2043. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 1285 or MATH 1213 with a grade of C or better, or a score of 27 on the Math componenet of the ACT exam. (Same as MATH 2554)

MATH2564 Calculus II (Sp, Su, Fa) Integral calculus of one variable and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 2554 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2564C)

MATH2564H Honors Calculus II (Sp) Integral calculus of one variable and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 2554 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2564C)

MATH2564C Calculus II (Sp, Su, Fa) Integral calculus of one variable and infinite series. Three hours of lecture and two hours of drill (recitation) per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2554 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2564)

MATH2574 Calculus III (Sp, Su, Fa) Differential and integral calculus of several variables, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2574C)

MATH2574H Honors Calculus III (Sp, Su, Fa) Differential and integral calculus of several variables, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2574C)

MATH2574C Calculus III (Sp, Su, Fa) Differential and integral calculus of several variables, and vector calculus. Three hours of lecture and two hours of drill (recitation) per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 2574)

MATH2701 Survey of Higher Math (Sp) This course overviews the landscape of higher mathematics, touching on many of the themes of modern mathematics: proof, logic, cardinality, analysis, modeling, abstract algebra, number theory, topology and geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 2564.

MATH3083 Linear Algebra (Sp, Su, Fa) Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 2554 or MATH 2043, with a grade of C or better.

MATH3093 Abstract Linear Algebra (Sp, Fa) A proof-based course on vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenspaces and eigenvalues, with applications. Recommended for mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a C or better.

MATH3103 Combinatorial and Discrete Mathematics (Sp) Basic combinatorial techniques including the study of networks, generating functions, principles of inclusion/ exclusion, Zn, Hamming coding theory, graph theory, and block designs. Prerequisite: MATH 2103.

MATH3113 Introduction to Abstract Algebra I (Sp, Fa) Introduction to algebraic structures with emphasis on rigorous justification of results. Prerequisite: MATH 3083.

MATH3133 History of Mathematics (Irregular) Prerequisite: MATH 2554 and junior standing.

MATH3203 Theory of Numbers (Irregular) Prerequisite: MATH 2554 and junior standing.

MATH3404 Differential Equations and Laplace Transform (Sp, Su, Fa) First and second order ordinary differential equations, the Laplace transform, and matrix systems of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a grade of C or better. (Same as MATH 3404C)

MATH3404C Differential Equations and Laplace Transform (Sp, Su, Fa) First and second order ordinary differential equations, the Laplace transform, and matrix systems of ordinary differential equations. Three hours of lecture and two hours of drill (recitation) per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2564 with a grade C or better. (Same as MATH 3404)

MATH3423 Advanced Applied Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa) Matrices, Fourier analysis, and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

MATH3773 Foundations of Geometry I (Fa) Axiomatic method; Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean geometry.

MATH3923H Honors Colloquium (Irregular) Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in mathematics).

MATH399VH Honors Mathematics Course (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

MATH400V Directed Readings (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

MATH4103 Finite Dimensional Vector Spaces (Irregular) Linear functionals, matrix representation of linear transformations, scalar product, and spectral representation of linear transformations. Prerequisite: MATH 3083.

MATH4113 Introduction to Abstract Algebra II (Fa) Topics in abstract algebra including finite abelian groups, linear groups, factorization in cummutative rings, quadratic field extensions, Gaussian integers, Wedderburn's theorem, and multilinear algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 3113.

MATH4153 Mathematical Modeling (Irregular) Mathematical techniques for formulating, analyzing, and criticizing deterministic models taken from the biological, social, and physical sciences. Techniques include graphical methods, stability, optimization, and phase plane analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

MATH4163 Dynamic Models in Biology (Irregular) Mathematical and computational techniques for developing, executing, and analyzing dynamic models arising in the biological sciences. Both discrete and continuous time models are studied. Applications include population dynamics, cellular dynamics, and the spread of infectious diseases. Prerequisite: MATH 2554. (Same as BIOL 4163)

MATH4253 Symbolic Logic I (Fa) Rigorous analyses of the concepts of proof, consistency, equivalence, validity, implication, and truth. Full coverage of truth-functional logic and quantification theory (predicate calculus). Discussion of the nature and limits of mechanical procedures (algorithms) for proving theorems in logic and mathematics. Informal accounts of the basic facts about infinite sets. (Same as PHIL 4253)

MATH4353 Numerical Linear Algebra (Sp) Numerical methods for problems of linear algebra, including the solution of very large systems, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MATH 3083.

MATH4363 Numerical Analysis (Fa) General iterative techniques, error analysis, root finding, interpolation, approximation, numerical integration, and numerical solution of differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

MATH4443 Complex Variable for Application (Sp) Complex analysis, series, and conformal mapping. Additional applications for graduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 3404.

MATH4503 Differential Geometry and Vector Calculus (Irregular) Topics include: Vector differential and integral calculus, Stokes' Theorem in 3-space, classical differential geometry in 3-space (curves, surfaces), differential forms, general Stokes' Theorem, applications to hydrodynamics, and electromagnetism. Prerequisite: MATH 2574.

MATH4513 Advanced Calculus I (Fa) The real and complex number systems, basic set theory and topology, sequences and series, continuity, differentiation, and Taylor's theorem. Emphasis is placed on careful mathematical reasoning. Prerequisite: MATH 2574 and MATH 3083.

MATH4523 Advanced Calculus II (Sp) The Riemann-Stieltjes integral, uniform convergence of functions, Fourier series, implicit function theorem, Jacobians, and derivatives of higher order. Prerequisite: MATH 4513.

MATH4932 Mathematics Major Seminar (Sp) The two-credit course has several components designed to address students' mathematical knowledge, problem-solving and communication skills. A series of weekly seminars on topics of historical or cross-disciplinary interest is accompanied by a weekly problem-solving seminar in which student presentations could play a part. The course also is a forum for sharing information about career opportunities and preparation for employment.

MATH498V Senior Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

MATH504V Special Topics for Teachers (Irregular) (1-6) Current topics in mathematics of interest to secondary school teachers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MATH510V Mathematical Seminar (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Members of the faculty and advanced students meet for presentation and discussion of topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MATH5123 Algebra I (Sp) What the beginning graduate student should know about algebra: groups, rings, fields, modules, algebras, categories, homological algebra, and Galois Theory. Prerequisite: MATH 3113.

MATH5133 Algebra II (Fa) Continuation of 5123. Prerequisite: MATH 5123.

MATH5303 Ordinary Differential Equations (Fa) Existence, uniqueness, stability, qualitative behavior, and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and MATH 4513 and programming experience.

MATH5313 Partial Differential Equations (Sp) Classification, boundary value problems, applications, and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 3423 and MATH 4513.

MATH5363 Scientific Computation and Numerical Methods (Fa) An introduction to numerical methods used in solving various problems in engineering and the sciences. May not earn credit for this course and MATH 4353 or MATH 4363. (Same as PHYS 5363)

MATH5453 Functional Analysis I (Odd years, Sp) Linear vector spaces and linear operators. Prerequisite: MATH 5513.

MATH5503 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I (Fa) Real number system, Lebesque measure, Lebesque integral, convergence theorems, differentiation of monotone functions, absolute continuity and the fundamental theorem of calculus L^P spaces, Holder and Minkowski inequalities, and bounded linear functionals on the L^P spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 4523.

MATH5513 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II (Sp) Measure and integration on abstract measure spaces, signed measures, Hahn decomposition, Radon-Nikdoym theorem, Lebesque decomposition, measures on algebras and their extensions, product measures, and Fubini's theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 5503.

MATH5523 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (Fa) Complex numbers, analytic functions, power series, complex integration, Cauchy's Theorem and integral formula, maximum principle, singularities, Laurent series, and Mibius maps. Prerequisite: MATH 4513.

MATH5533 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II (Sp) Riemann Mapping Theorem, analytic continuation, harmonic functions, and entire functions. Prerequisite: MATH 5523.

MATH5703 Foundations of Topology (Fa) Metric and general topological spaces, separation axioms, Urysohn's lemma, Tietze extension theorem, connectedness, compactness, and the Tychonoff theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 4513.

MATH5713 Algebraic Topology (Fa) Homotopy, singular and relative homology, excision theorem, the Mayer-Vietoris sequence, Beti numbers, and the Euler characteristic. Prerequisite: MATH 5703.

MATH600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MATH610V Directed Readings (Irregular) (1-6)

MATH619V Topics in Algebra (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Current research interests in algebra.

MATH659V Topics in Analysis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Current research interests in analysis.

MATH679V Topics in Topology (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Current research interest in topology.

MATH700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18)

(MBAD) Master of Business Administration

MBAD511V Corporate Financial Management (Sp) (2-3) Financial analysis, planning and control; decision making and modeling for financial managers; and financial policies for management. Corequisite: MBAD 5132 and MBAD 5222. Prerequisite: MBAD 5122 and MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5232.

MBAD512V Accounting Decisions and Control (Su) (2-3) Preparation and utilization of financial information for internal management purposes: planning and special decisions, cost determination, performance evaluation, and controls. Corequisite: MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5232.

MBAD513V Information Technology and Decision Making (Fa) (2-3) Utilization of information, quantitative techniques, and computer application in decision making and problem solving for managers. Corequisite: MBAD 5112 and MBAD 5222. Prerequisite: MBAD 5122 and MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5232.

MBAD521V Leading High Performance Organizations (Irregular) (2-3) Managing in a global workforce, including human resource issues, motivation, performance evaluation, quality concepts, transformational leadership, and selection/ recruitment/ development of employees. Corequisite: MBAD 5122 and MBAD 5232.

MBAD522V Managing Ideas, Products, and Services (Irregular) (2-3) Product management, market research, marketing communications, retailing and distribution, consumer behavior, and social and ethical implications of marketing. Corequisite: MBAD 5112 and MBAD 5132. Prerequisite: MBAD 5122 and MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5232.

MBAD523V Economics of Management and Strategy (Irregular) (2-3) Information economics and applied game theory. Corequisite: MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5122.

MBAD5241 Ethical Decision Making (Fa) Business Ethics will address business ethics issues from a personal, professional, and organizational perspective. We will cover basic ethical decision-making frameworks to help inform students' personal moral frameworks, ethical issues that are most relevant to managers of modern organizations, and the role of business in society

MBAD535V MBA Internship (Su) (1-3) This course allows a student to experience an internship within a business and benefit from the applied experience. The internship may be designed to offer a wide range of business experiences. The internship must be supervised by a faculty member as well as a member of the firm. MBA Director approval required. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

MBAD536V Study Abroad-Special Problems (Su) (1-3) Provides MBA students with the opportunity to explore a business problem in depth under the guidance of a graduate faculty member. MBA Director approval required.

MBAD5413 Partnering Project (Irregular) A large-scale, real world, 10 week project involving hands-on work addressing issues faced by managers in partnering firms. Corequisite: MBAD 5313 and MBAD 5423.

MBAD5423 Partnering Project II (Sp) Continuation of MBAD 5413. Corequisite: MBAD 5313 and MBAD 5413.

MBAD5433 Capstone Project (Su) A large-scale project integrating various business topics. Corequisite: MBAD 5313.

MBAD5511 Professional Development -- Special Topics In Business (Sp, Fa) A concentrated emphasis on one business topic. Corequisite: MBAD 5212, MBAD 5122 and MBAD 5232. Prerequisite: MBAD 5023. May be repeated for up to 5 hours of degree credit.

MBAD5602 Introduction to the Value Chain (Fa) An introduction to the value chain concept, the underlying framework of the Managerial MBA program. Topics include the primary value chain activities of inbound logistics, operations, outbound logistics, marketing and sales, and service, as well as the support activities of procurement, technology development, human resource management and firm infrastructure.

MBAD5613 Financial Accounting (Fa) This course covers the preparation and use of financial statements of publicly held corporations in the United States. Topics include the theory and rules used in financial statement preparation, a comparison of United States rules to International Accounting Standards, the analysis of financial statements to provide inter-company and industry comparisons and information about the financial statements of non-profit and governmental organizations.

MBAD5773 China Business Law, Regulations, and Ethics (Irregular) Business law in China that is relevant to managers; Chinese regulations particularly relevant to consumer products and retail; business ethics in China.

MBAD591V Capstone Project Definition (Irregular) (1-3) Identification of business processes for capstone project, including: estimation of the size of the opportunity, identification of key decisions, and proposal write up.

MBAD592V Capstone Project Plan (Irregular) (1-3) Second estimation of the size of the project benefit, identification of how the current process operates, assumptions identified, literature investigated, performance metrics, and Gantt chart for project.

MBAD593V Capstone Project Management (Irregular) (1-3) Management of the project, including frequent updates, milestone accomplishment, strategies to overcome challenges, and creation of an implementation plan.

MBAD594V Capstone Project Final Deliverables (Irregular) (1-3) Write up of entire capstone project, presentation of project, estimates of value, implementation plan, performance metrics, and change management plan.

(MEEG) Mechanical Engineering

MEEG2003 Statics (Sp, Su, Fa) Equilibrium and resultants of force systems in a plane and in space; analysis of structures, friction, centroids, moments of inertia, and virtual work method. Methods of analysis are emphasized. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 2574. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054.

MEEG2013 Dynamics (Sp, Su, Fa) Kinematics and kinetics of particle and of rigid bodies; work and energy; impulse and momentum, and special topics. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2003.

MEEG2023 Introductory Mechanics (Fa) This is a combined course covering basic parts of MEEG 2003 Statics and MEEG 2013 Dynamics. The topics include fundamentals in mechanics, forces, moments, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, kinematics and kinetics of particles. Mechanical Engineering students will not be given degree credit for this class. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054 and MATH 2574.

MEEG2100 Computer-aided Design Competency (Sp, Fa) Students entering the Mechanical Engineering Department are expected to possess basic competency in computer-aided design. Students need to pass a competency test. Deficiencies may be remedied through self-paced, computer-based instruction. Prerequisite: GNEG 1121 or GNEG 1121H.

MEEG2103 Introduction to Machine Analysis (Sp, Su) Introduction to kinematics and kinetics of mechanisms, static and dynamic forces, gears and cam design and analysis. Recitation three hours per week and drill one hour per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 2074, MEEG 2003, and MEEG 2100.

MEEG2303 Introduction to Materials (Sp, Fa) A study of chemical, physical, and electrical properties of materials using fundamental atomistic approach. The materials of interest are: metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The interactive relationship between structure, properties, and processing of materials will be emphasized. For various engineering applications. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MATH 2554, PHYS 2054 and CHEM 1103.

MEEG2403 Thermodynamics (Sp, Su, Fa) A study of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. Availability of energy, properties of liquids, gases, and vapors; nonflow and flow processes. Recitation 3 hours, drill 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054 and MATH 2564.

MEEG2703 Computer Methods in Mechanical Engineering (Sp, Su) Use of computers and programming for solving engineering problems. Basic numerical methods including errors, equation solution, matrices, optimization, regression, integration, and differential equations. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 3404. Corequisite: Drill component.

MEEG3013 Mechanics of Materials (Sp, Su, Fa) Stress and deformation of members in tension, compression, torsion, and bending, and the design of these members. Columns, statically indeterminate beams, and simple connections. Drill component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2003.

MEEG3113 Machine Dynamics and Control (Su, Fa) The principles of kinematics and kinetics for rigid body motion from dynamics are reviewed and applied to machine components with the goal being to determine their impact on machine behavior and performance. The time varying forces created by the movement of machine components are used to describe the machine's vibrational motion and elementary control principles are introduced with the goal of describing how these motions might be reduced or eliminated. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2013, MEEG 2103 and MATH 3404.

MEEG3202L Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (Sp, Fa) Introduction to measurement, uncertainty, data acquisition, and instrumentation with an emphasis in materials and manufacturing. Corequisite: Corequisite: Drill components. Pre or Corequisite: MEEG 3013. Prerequisite: MEEG 2303 and PHYS 2074

MEEG3212L Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II (Sp, Fa) Design and implementation of measurements, fabrication processes, data acquisition, and data analysis with emphasis in mechanical-design elements and mechanical systems. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: ELEG 3903, MEEG 3202L, MEEG 3503 and MEEG 3113.

MEEG3503 Mechanics of Fluids (Fa, Su) A study of fluids including properties, pressure forces, and field flow utilizing conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and momentum principles. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 3404. Prerequisite: MEEG 2403.

MEEG4003 Intermediate Dynamics (Irregular) Review of central-force motion of spacecraft, use of rotating reference frames, Coriolis acceleration. Kinematics of rigid bodies in 3-D space: velocities and accelerations in different moving reference frames, addition theorem of angular accelerations. Kinetics of rigid bodies in 3-D space: eigenvalues and eigenvectors of inertia matrices, momentum and kinetic energy of a rigid body in 3-D motion, Euler's equations of motion; precession, nutation, and spin of a gyroscope; forced steady precession, torque free steady precession, space cone, and body cone. Prerequisite: MEEG 2013

MEEG4023 Composite Materials: Analysis and Design (Irregular) A study of fibrous composite materials with emphasis on mechanical behavior, synthesis, and application. Topics include macro- and micromechanical analysis lamina, lamina theory, failure analysis in design, and manufacturing techniques. Prerequisite: MEEG 3013.

MEEG4104 Machine Element Design (Sp, Su) Select design components commonly used in modern machines, principally for energy transmission. Students will be required to design a small system and present their design to the class. Prerequisite: MEEG 3013.

MEEG4104H Honors Machine Element Design (Sp, Su) Select design components commonly used in modern machines, principally for energy transmission. Students will be required to design a small system and present their design to the class. Advanced project required of honors students. Advanced project required. Prerequisite: Meeg 3013.

MEEG4123 Finite Element Methods I (Irregular) Introduction to the use of the finite element method in mechanical engineering analysis and design. Use of commercial software to solve thermal and mechanical problems. Pre- or Corequisite: MEEG 3013 and MEEG 4413.

MEEG4131 Creative Project Design I (Sp, Fa) Students will select a capstone design project, and each student group will prepare a formal written proposal on their project for presentation to a panel of judges. This group project will be carried to completion in MEEG 4133. Corequisite: MEEG 4132. Pre or Corequisite: ENGL 2003 and (MEEG 4103 or MEEG 4483). Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

MEEG4132 Professional Engineering Practices (Sp, Fa) Design proposal preparation, design codes, professional ethics, engineering economics, and the role of the engineer in society. Corequisite: MEEG 4131. Pre or Corequisite: ENGL 2003 and (MEEG 4103 or MEEG 4483). Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

MEEG4133 Creative Project Design II (Sp, Fa) Student groups will present their final capstone design proposal to a faculty panel and then carry out their project to completion. Each student group will make timely progress reports, complete their design project, and present their final report to a panel of judges. Prerequisite: MEEG 4131.

MEEG4202L Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III (Sp, Fa) Application of measurement techniques to mechanical engineering problems with an emphasis in thermal systems. Corequisite: Drill component. Pre- or corequisite: MEEG 4483. Prerequisite: MEEG 3212L and MEEG 4103.

MEEG4213 Control of Mechanical Systems (Irregular) Mathematical modeling for feedback control of dynamic mechanical systems with design techniques using LaPlace transforms, state variables, root locus, frequency analysis, and criteria for performance and stability. Prerequisite: MEEG 3113. (Same as ELEG 4403)

MEEG4233 Microprocessors in Mechanical Engineering I: Electromechanical Systems (Irregular) Microcomputer architectural, programming, and interfacing. Smart product design (microprocessor-based design). Control of DC and stepper motors and interfacing to sensors. Applications to robotics and real-time control. Mobile robot project. Digital and analog electronics are reviewed where required. Prerequisite: ELEG 3913.

MEEG4303 Materials Laboratory (Irregular) A study of properties, uses, testing, and heat treatment of basic engineering materials and related analytical techniques. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2303.

MEEG4303H Honors Materials Laboratory (Irregular) A study of properties, uses, testing, and heat treatment of basic engineering materials. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MEEG 2303 and MEEG 3013.

MEEG4413 Heat Transfer (Sp, Su) Basic thermal energy transport processes; conduction, convection, and radiation; and the mathematical analysis of systems involving these processes in both steady and time-dependent cases. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503 and MEEG 2703.

MEEG4423 Power Generation (Irregular) Study of design and operational aspects of steam, gas, and combined cycle power plants. Brief study of Nuclear and Alternative energy systems. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503.

MEEG4433 Aerospace Propulsion (Irregular) Principles, operation, and characteristics of gas turbine and rocket engines. Brief study of novel spacecraft propulsion systems. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503.

MEEG4453 Industrial Waste and Energy Management (Irregular) Applications of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and electric machinery to the analysis of waste streams and energy consumption for industrial facilities. Current techniques and technologies for waste minimization and energy conservation including energy-consuming systems and processes, utility rate analysis, economic analysis and auditing are taught. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

MEEG4473 Indoor Environmental Control (Irregular) Gives student a thorough understanding of the fundamental theory of air conditioning design for commercial buildings, including calculating heating and cooling loads along with the proper selection and sizing of air conditioning equipment. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

MEEG4483 Thermal Systems Analysis and Design (Su, Fa) Analysis design and optimization of thermal systems and components with examples from such areas as power generation, refrigeration, and propulsion, Availability loss characteristics of energy systems and availability conservation methods. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

MEEG4483H Honors Thermal Systems Analysis and Design (Su, Fa) Analysis design and optimization of thermal systems and components with examples from such areas as power generation, refrigeration, and propulsion. Availability loss characteristics of energy systems and availability conservation methods. Additional topics, with an additional design project and /or more rigorus approach to design projects for honors course. Advanced project required. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

MEEG4493 Internal Combustion Engines (Irregular) Study of the design of internal combustion engines, including emissions and performance issues. Pre- or Corequisite: MEEG 3503.

MEEG4503 Introduction to Flight (Fa) The course will provide understanding in basic aerodynamics, airfoil design and characteristics, and flight control surfaces. Prerequisite: MATH 3404, MEEG 3503.

MEEG4503H Honors Introduction to Flight (Fa) The course will provide understanding in basic aerodynamics, airfoil design and characteristics, and flight control surfaces. Prerequisite: MATH 3404 and MEEG 3503.

MEEG4523 Astronautics (Irregular) Study of spacecraft design and operations. Prerequisite: MEEG 2013 and MEEG 2403 or consent of instructor.

MEEG4703 Mathematical Methods in Engineering (Irregular) Determinants, matrices, inverse of a matrix, simultaneous equations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, coordinate transformations for matrices, diagonalization, square roots of a matrix, cryptography, and method of least squares. Vector algebra and calculus, Green's theorem, Strokes' theorem, and Gauss' divergence theorem. Index notation, epsilon-delta identity, and Cartesian tensors. Curvilinear coordinates, base vectors, and covariant and contravariant tensors. Applications to mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 2574.

MEEG4903H Honors Mechanical Engineering Research (Sp, Fa) Independent research for mechanical engineering honors students. Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in Honors Program.

MEEG491V Special Projects (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MEEG491VH Honors Special Projects (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6)

MEEG5033 Advanced Mechanics of Materials I (Irregular) Combined stress, theories of failure, thick-walled cylinders, bending of unsymmetrical sections, torsion in noncircular section, plate stresses, and strain energy analysis. Prerequisite: MEEG 2013 and MEEG 3013.

MEEG5103 Structural Dynamics (Irregular) The forced and random vibration response of complex structural systems are studied through the use of the finite element method. Computational aspects of these problems are discussed and digital computer applications undertaken. Prerequisite: MEEG 3113 and MEEG 4103 and graduate standing.

MEEG5113 Modal Analysis Methods (Irregular) Fundamental concepts of both analytical and experimental modal analysis methods are examined and applied to the study of complex structural systems. Computational aspects of these problems are discussed, and digital computer applications undertaken with experimental verification. Prerequisite: MEEG 5103 and graduate standing.

MEEG5123 Finite Elements Methods II (Irregular) Development and application of finite element (FE) methods used to solve transient and two-dimensional boundary value problems. Applications are taken from solid and fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and acoustics. Emphasis is placed on the FE methodology in order to make accessible the research literature and commercial software manuals, and to encourage responsible use and interpretation of FE analysis. Prerequisite: MEEG 4123 and graduate standing or consent.

MEEG5143 Advanced Machine Design (Su) Application of advanced topics such as probability theory, fracture mechanics, and computer methods to the design and analysis of complex mechanical systems. Prerequisite: MEEG 4103 and graduate standing.

MEEG5253 Bio-Mems (Sp) Topics include the fundamental principles of microfluidics, Navier-Stokes Equation, bio/abio interfacing technology, bio/abio hybrid integration of microfabrication technology, and various biomedical and biological problems that can be addressed with microfabrication technology and the engineering challenges associated with it. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503 or CVEG 3213 or CHEG 2133. (Same as BENG 5253)

MEEG5263 Introduction to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (Fa) A study of mechanics and devices on the micro scale. Course topics will include: introduction to micro scales, fundamentals of microfabrication, surface and bulk micromachining, device packaging, device reliability, examples of micro sensors and actuators. Recitation three hours per week.

MEEG5273 Electronic Packaging (Irregular) An introductory treatment of electronic packaging from single chip to multichip including materials, electrical design, thermal design, mechanical design, package modeling and simulation, processing considerations, reliability, and testing. Credit cannot be earned for both MEEG 5273 and ELEG 5273. Prerequisite: (ELEG 3213 or ELEG 3913) and MATH 3404. (Same as ELEG 5273)

MEEG5303 Physical Metallurgy (Fa) Physical and chemical properties of solids and the application of materials in commerce. Prerequisite: MEEG 2303.

MEEG5323 Physical and Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes (Irregular) Fundamental principles of materials behavior in the deposition of films by PVD/CVD. Topics include kinetic theory of gases, statistical mechanics, plasmas, diagnostics, reaction rate theory, nucleation and growth, crystal structures and defects in thin films, advanced characterization techniques for thin films, and applications in microelectronics, tribology, corrosion, bio- and nano-materials. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Engineering or consent of instructor.

MEEG5403 Advanced Thermodynamics (Sp) An in-depth review of classical thermodynamics, including availability analysis, combustion, and equilibrium, with an introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Engineering or consent of instructor.

MEEG5423 Statistical Thermodynamics (Irregular) Concepts and techniques for describing high temperature and chemically reactive gases from a molecular point of view. Introductory kinetic theory, chemical thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics applied. Prerequisite: MEEG 2403 and MATH 2574.

MEEG5433 Combustion (Even years, Fa) Introduction to combustion of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. Equilibrium and kinetics of hydrocarbon oxidation, laminar and turbulent flames, premixed and non-premixed combustion processes, ignition, quenching, stability, emissions and diagnostics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Engineering or consent of instructor.

MEEG5453 Advanced Heat Transfer (Fa) More in-depth study of topics covered in MEEG 4413, Heat Transfer, and coverage of some additional topics. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413 or CHEG 3143 or equivalent.

MEEG5473 Radiation Heat Transfer (Even years, Su) Spectral analysis, radiant exchange in gray and non-gray enclosures, gas radiation, and multi-mode heat transfer. Prerequisite: MEEG 5453 or equivalent.

MEEG5503 Advanced Fluid Dynamics I (Sp) A basic survey of the characteristics of fluid flow under a variety of conditions with examples. Begins with a derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations and an evaluation of the dimensionless groups found from these equations. Topics to be covered include viscous laminar and turbulent boundary layers, jets and wakes, Stokes flow, inviscid flows with and without free surfaces and turbulence. Prerequisite: MEEG 3503 and MATH 3404.

MEEG5733 Advanced Numerical Methods (Irregular) Numerical methods for the solution of linear and non-linear ordinary and partial differential equations; initial and boundary value problems; one-step and multi-step methods; predominantly finite difference but also finite element and control volume techniques; and computer applications. Graduate standing in Engineering or consent of instructor.

MEEG590V Research (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Fundamental or applied research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEEG591V Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MEEG600V Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-6) Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEEG6263 Advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (Irregular) An advanced study of microscale mechanics and devices. The course material will include in depth discussion of 3 to 4 current MEMS technology areas such as microfluidics, optical MEMS, and inertial sensors. Students will also be required to fabricate and test a functional MEMS device in a processing laboratory. Prerequisite: MEEG 5263.

MEEG6273 Advanced Electronic Packaging (Irregular) An advanced treatment of electronic packaging concentrating on multichip modules. Topics covered include electrical design, thermal design, mechanical design, package modeling and simulation, computer-aided engineering and design, processing limitations on MCM performance, reliability, testing, and economic considerations. Prerequisite: ELEG 5273. (Same as ELEG 6273)

MEEG6800 Graduate Seminar (Sp, Fa) A periodic seminar devoted to mechanical engineering research topics. Course includes letter grades A, B, C, D, and F as well as CR.

MEEG700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(MEPH) Microelectronics-Photonics

MEPH488V MicroEP Undergraduate Research (Sp, Fa) (1-3) Special research topics associated with undergraduates enrolled in the Microelectronics-Photonics minor program, or by special permission of the microEP Director to undergraduate students engaged in research with microEP faculty members. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MEPH5383 Research Commercialization and Product Development (Sp) This survey course examines research commercialization through analysis of IP, technology space, market space, manufacturability, financials, and business plans. Entrepreneurial behaviors and product development within large companies are also discussed. A case study using a current UA faculty member's research commercialization effort will be developed. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

MEPH5611 Research Communication Seminar of MS Students (Sp, Fa) This course serves as a forum fo MS students to develop oral presentation skills and to exchange research ideas. Research presentations will be on various topics in the area of micro to nanoscal materials, processing, and devices, with research management and planning also being addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH5713 Advanced Nanomaterials Chemistry (Irregular) Science and engineering graduates are using more nanomaterials, and modern industry demands that its scientists and engineers have materials chemistry knowledge. Materials from the micro to nanoscale will be examined in this course from the perspective of fundamental chemistry principles to build a picture of tomorrow's materials. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

MEPH5723 Physics at the Nanoscale (Irregular) This is a cross-disciplinary course that is focused on teaching nanoscience and engineering by studying surface science, the building and analysis of quantum-confined structures, and related nano manufacturing processes. Students will achieve an integrated knowledge of the concepts of surface science, quantum mechanics, nano processing and manipulation, and techniques of materials research. (Same as PHYS 5723)

MEPH5733L Fabrication at the Nanoscale (Sp) This hands-on lab course will cover the disciplines needed to make active electronic and photonic devices utilizing nanoscale structures and fabrication techniques presently used in research and industry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor.

MEPH5742 Transmission Electron Microscopy Theory and Operation (Irregular) This new laboratory course will introduce students to practical electron microscopy and to the operation of the Titan S/TEM for examination of sub-angstrom examination of materials. Students will learn how to conduct a TEM study, how to operate the TEM, and how to extract and interpret useful information. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH5811 1st Year Operations Seminar - Infrastructure Management (Fa) Weekly seminar for 1st year Microelectronics-Photonics graduate students to discuss issues that increase professional performance in technology-centered organizations. The discussions will focus on issues that affect organizational infrastructure, career planning, organizational structures, and may include examples from current events. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH5821 Ethics for Scientists and Engineers (Su) This course will introduce methods useful in the practice of ethical decision making in the high technology academic and industrial work place. An emphasis will be placed on applying the methods discussed in the text to student and instructor past professional experiences. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

MEPH5832 Proposal Writing and Management (Su) This course introduces factors that affect proposal success in both the academic and industrial arenas; demonstrates different approaches to writing successful proposals; and introduces students to the legal responsibilities and ramifications of proposal management. Students will write two proposals for peer review and formal evauation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH587V Special Topics in Microelectronics-Photonics (Irregular) (1-4) Consideration of current microelectronic-photonic topics not covered in other courses. One section will be created for each topic only after a syllabus is submitted to the microEP office by the faculty member teaching the course. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

MEPH588V Special Problems in Microelectronics-Photonics (Irregular) (1-3) Opportunity for individual study of advanced subjects related to a graduate degree in Microelectronics-Photonics to suit individual requirements. One section will be created for each student only after a syllabus is submitted to the microEP office by the supervising faculty member. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MEPH5911 1st Year Operations Seminar - Personnel Management (Sp) Weekly seminar for 1st year Microelectronics-Photonics graduate students to discuss issues that increase professional performance in technology-centered organizations. The discussions will focus on issues that affect personnel management, team building and structures, and may include examples from current events. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH6611 Research Communication Seminar of PhD Students (Sp, Fa) This course serves as a forum for Ph.D. students to develop oral presentation skills and to exchange research ideas. Research presentations will be on various topics in the area of micro to nanoscale materials, processing and devices, with research management and planning also being addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH6811 2nd Year Operations Seminar - Management and Leadership (Fa) Weekly seminar for 2nd year Microelectronics-Photonics graduate students to discuss issues that increase professional performance in technology-centered organizations. The discussions will focus on issues that affect management and leadership effectiveness and efficiency, and may include examples from current events. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MEPH6911 2nd Year Operations Seminar - Advanced Management and Leadership (Sp) Weekly seminar for 2nd year Microelectronics-Photonics graduate students to discuss advanced issues that increase professional performance in technology-centered organizations. The discussions will focus on the complex issues that affect management and leadership effectiveness and efficiency, and may include examples from current events. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

(MEST) Middle Eastern Studies

MEST2003 Islam in History, Practice and Experience (Sp, Su, Fa) This course introduces Islam as a global religion and world civilization, including study of the Qur'an, prophet Muhammad, ritual and community practices, metaphysics, mysticism, art, literature, and sacred and critical history.

MEST2013 Gateways to the Middle East (Sp, Su, Fa) This course is designed to provide students with fundamental building blocks for understanding the contemporary Middle East/Islamic World. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of the geo-cultural region, including history, politics, arts and literature, religions and cultures, social geography, and economics.

MEST399V MEST: Honors Thesis (Irregular) (1-3) Middle East Studies Honors research, readings and thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MEST4003 Middle East Studies Colloquium (Sp, Su, Fa) An interdepartmental colloquium with an annual change in subject required of all students in the Middle East studies program. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MEST4003H Honors Middle East Studies Honors Colloquium (Sp, Su, Fa) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

MEST410V Special Topics in Middle East, North Africa & Mediterranean Studies (Irregular) (1-3) Various Topics in Middle East Studies: classes in lecture and seminar formats will focus on the Middle East, North Africa and Mediterranean will specialization in anthropology, art and architecture, regional culture and geography, history, political sciences, and regional language and literature. Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

(MGMT) Management

MGMT3563 Management Concepts and Organizational Behavior (Irregular) Business students may not receive credit for this course. Course introduces students to fundamental concepts of management practice with particular emphasis on managing human behavior in organizations. Addresses the planning, organizing, directing, and controlling functions performed by managers as these functions relate to managing human resources. Provides survey of critical management concepts; enables students to develop analytical and problem solving skills through case studies and experimental exercises. Students may not receive credit for both WCOB 2033 and MGMT 3563.

MGMT3933 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development (Fa) The role of the entrepreneur in starting up new businesses. Identification of new venture opportunities and the evaluation of their feasibility.

MGMT4003H Honors Management Colloquium (Irregular) Explores events, concepts and/or new developments in the field of Management. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MGMT4103 Special Topics in Management (Irregular) Explores trends, concepts, and important developments in management as they impact on organizational performance. Topics are selected by the Management Department faculty for each semester the course is offered.

MGMT4103H Honors Special Topics in Management (Irregular) Explores trends, concepts, and important developments in management as they impact on organizational performance. Topics are selected by the Management Department faculty for each semester the course is offered.

MGMT4243 Ethics and Corporate Responsibility (Sp, Fa) A comprehensive and critical examination of traditional and current ethical theories and approaches that guide business decision-making, ethical issues that affect business decisions, and ethics related to the various business disciplines.

MGMT4253 Leadership (Sp, Fa) This course offers a foundation for understanding and evaluating organizational leadership. It is designed to assist students in developing frameworks for understanding and enacting leadership. This course examines topics such as the nature and foundation of the leader-follower relationship, models that explain effective leadership, and the interface of leadership with gender, ethics, and culture. Prerequisite: WCOB 2033 or MGMT 3563.

MGMT4263 Organizational Change and Development (Sp, Fa) This course will develop diagnostic and intervention skills that can be applied to identifying and overcoming problems of morale and productivity in organizations. A variety of behavioral methods will be covered. Prerequisite: WCOB 2033 or MGMT 3563.

MGMT4433 Small Enterprise Management (Sp) Small enterprise opportunities and problems emphasizing innovation, management planning and control, financing, marketing and legal requirements. Emphasis on application of management knowledge to small enterprise management. Prerequisite: MGMT 3933.

MGMT450V Independent Study (Irregular) (1-3) Permits students on individual basis to explore selected topics in management. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

MGMT4583 International Management (Sp) Develops an understanding of international business management and the cultural environments in which IB exists today. Students examine international business practices and learn about unique elements of business as it practiced in selected nations and diverse cultures.

MGMT4943 Organizational Staffing (Sp, Fa) Indepth study of theoretical, legal, methodological, and substantive issues related to selection, performance appraisal, and development of employees. Students participate in individual and group projects designed to provide theoretical and practical skills related to staffing. Prerequisite: WCOB 1033.

MGMT4953 Organizational Rewards and Compensation (Sp, Fa) Develops an understanding of reward systems theory and its application to the design of compensation systems. Provides theoretical and legal background and practical applications for the use of reward systems in attracting, motivating, and retaining employees. Prerequisite: WCOB 1033.

MGMT4993 Entrepreneurship Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) Hands-on management of an actual on-going business. Students will gain experience working in, making decisions about, and managing a business. Topics covered include accounting, economics, finance, information systems, law, logistics, management, and marketing. Entrance by application only. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MGMT5213 Business Foundations for Entrepreneurs (Sp) Introduction to the fundamental business concepts an entrepreneur needs to know to evaluate and launch a successful new venture. Topic areas include recruitment, selection, motivation and management of employees, market analysis and the marketing mix, financial strategies and accounting for funds, economic considerations, and the management of operations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MGMT5223 Managing & Leading Organizations (Fa) Management for a global environment. The class will cover interpersonal workplace skills such as leadership and motivation, along with the management of human capital through well designed recruitment, selection, performance evaluation, compensation, and quality control systems.

MGMT5313 Strategic Management (Sp) Strategy formulation, strategy implementation, and other topics related to the long-term success of the firm. Includes role of the general manager, international issues, and the impact of management fads on decision making. Prerequisite: MBAD 5212 and MBAD 5222 and MBAD 5232.

MGMT5323 New Venture Development (Fa) Focuses on the identification and analysis of new venture opportunities and how entrepreneurs acquire the human and financial resources needed to develop successful businesses. Topics include market analysis, development of products and services, negotiation, developing and executing business plans, and new venture financing.

MGMT5363 Innovation & Creativity (Sp) This class will provide a framework for developing, assessing and implementing innovations in start-ups and established businesses. Focus is on creative decision making, managing for innovation, strategic analysis of innovations, and implementation of innovations. Aimed at entrepreneurs, brand managers, and managers in industries where innovation is a key strategic capability.

MGMT5993 Entrepreneurship Practicum (Sp, Su, Fa) Hands-on management of an actual on-going business. Students will gain experience working in, making decisions about, and managing a competitive business. Students will be required to analyze the business in a term paper or other integrative assignment. Entrance by application only.

MGMT6113 Seminar in Organizational Behavior (Irregular) Survey of theoretical and empirical literature in organizational behavior. Stresses critical evaluation of current writing in the field and its integration with prior research. Covers topics relating to motivation, individual differences, job attitudes, social influence processes, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program.

MGMT6123 Seminar in Organization Theory (Irregular) This Ph.D.-level seminar presents an overview and introduction into organization theory literature. Emphasis on the development of relevant schools of thought, changes in the content of the traditional or 'mainstream' themes, current topics, schools of thought, and future directions are examined. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program.

MGMT6133 Seminar in Strategy Research (Irregular) This Ph.D.-level seminar presents an overview and introduction into the strategic management literature. Emphasis on both the content and process of the extant research. Relevant theory, methods, 'mainstream' themes, current topics, schools of thought, and future directions are examined. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program.

MGMT6213 Seminar in Research Methods (Irregular) Familiarizes students with the principles and techniques underlying research in management and organizations. Issues of basic philosophy of science and research methods are covered. Special attention given to the practical problems of research design, measurement, data collection, sampling, and interpretation in conducting research in management and in organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program.

MGMT6223 Seminar in Management Topics (Irregular) Seminar in special research topics in management. Topics vary depending upon instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

MGMT6233 Seminar in Human Resource Management (Irregular) Provides an overview of major issues in human resource management. Designed to familiarize students with the seminal research in human resource management, and to provide them with the conceptual and methodological tools necessary to do research in the area. Prerequisite: Admission to a Ph.D. program.

MGMT636V Special Problems in Management (Sp, Fa) (1-6) Individual reading and research. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

MGMT700V Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Fa) (1-18) Prerequisite: Candidacy.

(MILS) Army ROTC

MILS1001 Basic Outdoor Skills and Leadership Introduction (Fa) Incorporates various outdoor field craft skills involving both classroom and outdoor instruction. Subjects include small group leadership, rappelling, basic map reading, water safety and first aid. Introduction to safe use of a rifle and basic marksmanship. Introduction to organization, values, and role of the Army. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week.

MILS1011 Rappelling, Outdoor Field Craft and Leadership Development (Sp) Incorporates various outdoor field craft involving both classroom and outdoor instruction. Subjects include basic rappelling/mountaineering, intermediate map reading/ orienteering, first aid and outdoor cold/hot weather survival skills. Introduction to small group leadership principles. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week.

MILS1101 Basic Marksmanship (Fa) Introduction to safe use of a rifle and practical application of rifle marksmanship. Course includes weapons safety, mechanics, capabilities, and fundamentals of marksmanship. Includes visit to fire at a local indoor rifle range. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science.

MILS1211 Basic Outdoor Field Craft and Skills (Sp, Fa) Introduction to basic military survival skills and outdoor field craft. Subjects include cold/hot weather survival, water procurement methods, expedient field shelters, signaling, map reading and rappelling technique. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science. Classroom 2 hours per week.

MILS2002 Leadership Development I (Fa) Continuation of basic skills presented in MILS 1001 and MILS 1011. Course focus is on small unit leadership, team building and management skills. Includes an introduction to small unit tactics. Students develop leadership foundations by leading discussions, developing and briefing operation plans using the military decision making model. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS2012 Leadership Development II (Sp) Continuation of leadership skills presented in MILS 2002. Course focus is on decision making process, time management, and leadership skills. Includes an introduction to military writing and basic tactics. Cadets continue training in land navigation, first aid, and outdoor field craft. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS2101 Advanced Rifle Marksmanship (Sp) Course to teach students the fundamentals of Advanced Rifle Marksmanship. Class is conducted once a week with topics including: Air rifle, small bore firing, advanced practical exercises of different shooting positions and marksmanship competition with other universities. Prerequisite: MILS 1101.

MILS3004 Applied Leadership I (Fa) Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces.

MILS3014 Applied Leadership II (Sp) Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces.

MILS4001 Contemporary Military Issues (Sp, Fa) Individual study for advanced undergraduates. Students will research, write a paper, and give an oral presentation of a current military issue. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS4004 Advanced Leadership I (Fa) The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work (MILS 3004 and MILS 3014).

MILS4011 Advanced Military Correspondence (Sp, Fa) Practicum for advanced undergraduates. Students submit prepared military correspondence projects written in the military style using military forms and formats. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS4014 Advanced Leadership II (Sp) The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work.

(MKTG) Marketing

MKTG3433 Introduction to Marketing Strategy (Fa) Examines strategies, tactical, and operational decisions related to contemporary marketing activities. Topics covered include product, services and international strategies in consumer and business markets. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

MKTG3553 Consumer Behavior (Fa) Analyzes consumer motivation, buying behavior, market adjustment, product innovation and adaptation; consumer market measurement, including survey of economic, behavioral science theories of consumer market behavior, producer and intermediary reactions. Consumer decision making is evaluated as to psychological drives, sociological concepts